building my new titanium bike

Who are you (no off-topic talk please)

Moderator: Moderator Team

darthFrog
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2014 5:47 am

by darthFrog

Thanks for all the useful comments. This place has an amazing amount of expertise.

Regarding my saddle position - thanks. I will trying angling the seat up a tad - I had noticed that I was sliding forward a bit. Might need to lower the seat post a bit at the same time. Yes the saddle/handlebar drop /differential height is pretty big, but I have actually being doing yoga and working on my flexibility. It's not great, but I can just about put my hands flat on the ground when touching my toes. A huge improvement over a few years ago. So I don't feel uncomfortable when riding. Regarding the Eddy Merckx titanium headstem - wow impressed by your detailed knowledge. I saw some doco where Eddy Merckx was being interviewed, and I thought he referred to it as his titanium bike. Looks like he just meant the stem. Anyway, he said the bike was priceless and that he would never sell it.

Finally, the link to the frame fatigue testing article. Thank you so much. This was both really interesting and a real eye-opener. Particularly about the steel frames. Also interesting that some carbon frames outlasted the titanium ones. I wouldn't have predicted that. I wish all frames had to be tested in this way, so we could do some decent comparisons. My impression was that titanium did not fatigue as long as it was stressed below a particular threshold. Above the threshold, it fatigues like any other metal. Interesting that aluminium came out of the test so well, since aluminium fatigues at all stresses and does not have such a threshold. Still, the test simulation was pretty close to actual cycling stresses, so I'll go with those results. Looks like aluminium frames represent good value for money - stiff, light and very durable. I guess the trade-off is the harsher ride.

darthFrog
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2014 5:47 am

by darthFrog

Regarding the non-matching wheels - very observant. The back wheel is Mavic R-sys premium, the front is the Ksyrium SL (Kindly lent to me by a friend). My front R-sys has an annoying clicking noise that seems to be quite common in this wheelset. It is more pronounced when you put weight on the wheel, and disappears if you ride with no hands and lean right back. I gather from the forums that the spokes push through the hub and contact an alumium bush/ring. I found aluminium shavings inside the hub when I looked at it. The wheel has not been abused in any way, and I believe this should be a warranty issue, but my LBS has said it is unlikely the Mavic distributor in Au will come to the party (I bought the wheels over the internet). The wheel has already had the aluminium bush thing replaced once, but the clicking never went. I have also tried a tiny bit of oil where spokes enter hub, and taping around the tube valve (both suggested remedies), but no luck. Tightening spokes may work, but not keen on doing this.

Any one else had this problem with r-sys?

darthFrog
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2014 5:47 am

by darthFrog

Ok, I changed my seat position yesterday. Angled the front of the seat up a little and lowered the seatpost slightly. Must admit, it feels much better. Makes an already very comfortable saddle even more comfortable. Thanks. Now, what should I be doing with the handle bars?

GT56
Posts: 571
Joined: Fri Jun 05, 2009 9:40 am
Location: Switzerland

by GT56

darthFrog wrote:Ok, I changed my seat position yesterday. Angled the front of the seat up a little and lowered the seatpost slightly. Must admit, it feels much better. Makes an already very comfortable saddle even more comfortable. Thanks. Now, what should I be doing with the handle bars?


rotate them back so that the lower part is horizontal, or even pointing down slightly

when you are done, please post another picture

NiFTY
Posts: 1090
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 11:26 pm

by NiFTY

What GT56 said, lowest part of drops should be horizontal, some people even have the bar plug pointing slightly towards the ground. The top of the bars should also end up being flat or slightly angled up. Rotate the shifters so there is a smooth transition from hoods to bar. You might find that other bars suit you better, most people don't get along with anatomic bend bars, as it dictates exactly where you can and can't have your hands.
Evo 5.02kg SL3 6.77 Slice RS 8.89 viewtopic.php?f=10&t=110579" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post