Alps - Tubular or Clincher?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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dcaspira
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 1:10 am

by dcaspira

Hey guys,

Love my tubs, but concerned about punctures and the spare staying on the rim during descents

What would you / do you ride in the alps?

by Weenie


airwise
Posts: 1049
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:31 pm

by airwise

Many locals run tubs.

Punctures are rare and clincher blow outs at 100kph are not a nice experience.

I got one puncture in 15,000 km last Summer in the mountains of Europe.

I got three on my first ride back in the UK.

fdegrove
Tubbie Guru
Posts: 5851
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Location: Belgium

by fdegrove

Hi,

Love my tubs, but concerned about punctures and the spare staying on the rim during descents


Most of the roads in the Alps are well maintained. Just run tubs. As stated by airwise, a puncture with a clincher whilst descending full blast could end up where you'd rather not want to be...
Tubulars tend to deflate slowly unless of course the sidewall is ripped to shreds which is rather uncommon and can happen with a clincher just the same.
Use a pre-glued tub as a spare, don't do anything crazy, you'll be surprised to learn how hard it is to remove it once's it's been used for a few dozen of miles.

Enjoy the Alps, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

HillRPete
Posts: 2292
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 8:08 am
Location: Pedal Square

by HillRPete

Recommendation depends on lots of variables. Are you riding alone or in a group? Are there other tub riders (for sharing of spare parts)? Often roads are in good order, as fdegrove says, but you can find quite challenging terrain if you look for uncommon/special climbs. Finally, what are your clincher options? Alu or carbon, light or heavy? When/where are you going, are you expecting rain?

Personally I'm using clinchers for long rides, and would stay away from tubs abroad, unless in a group of like-minded. Gives me some piece of mind.

cllrhodgen
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2012 2:31 pm
Location: UK

by cllrhodgen

Just wait for disc brakes - they'll be all the rage this season!? :)

dcaspira
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 1:10 am

by dcaspira

wassertreter wrote:Recommendation depends on lots of variables. Are you riding alone or in a group? Are there other tub riders (for sharing of spare parts)? Often roads are in good order, as fdegrove says, but you can find quite challenging terrain if you look for uncommon/special climbs. Finally, what are your clincher options? Alu or carbon, light or heavy? When/where are you going, are you expecting rain?


Some great points, mostly solo with a few group rides as I get to know more people. Have pretty much a total Tub setup - though happy to buy some clinchers if it's the smart thing to do. I think it's fair to expect some rain, though we will be there in summer (Annecy- France). I typically ride on 23's with about 110 f and 115 psi on back.

I ride quite a bit in the (mini) alps here in Australia on tubs, and carry a sealant and spare (just incase). Sealant works a treat 80% of the time, though I have local support and friends with me should I get in trouble. This isn't something I would have straight away in the alps.

I am interested in clinchers due to these 'safety' concern, but love the ride of tubs both up and down the hills.

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Lig
Posts: 315
Joined: Sun Dec 19, 2010 3:57 pm
Location: UK

by Lig

I ran tubs on Zipps in the alps and had no flats. These were just stuck on with Velox tape and they stayed on a treat (Galibier, Madelene, D’huez decents)– (I know a lot of people don’t like Velox – but I have always used it with no probs at all)….

I then got a pair of Lightweight Standards and liked these but always had that niggle in my mind when I went out about getting a flat, but did only have two in the 18months or so I had them.

In the end I bought a set of Lightweight clinchers and they are superb – I don’t notice much difference in feel over the tub version and the piece of mind of the clincher is great! Again I have been to the Alps and descended with no issues, at first I was wary about heat build up and a blow out, but no sign of this at all.

But they do come at a hefty cost. Back to your original question, My advice..I would stick to running tubs, unless you can shell out for some very good carbon clinchers….

Lig.

Antoine
Posts: 452
Joined: Tue May 03, 2011 6:36 pm
Location: France

by Antoine

as said before punctures are rare in the alps.
I went in Annecy 2 years ago with my group and nobody had a flat (around 500 kms /15 riders).
At worst you would be able to borrow a spare tub from one of the numerous cyclists around or hitch a ride back.

airwise
Posts: 1049
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:31 pm

by airwise

I tend to pick up a taxi card when I'm staying in a locale. I keep it in my back pocket just in case.

In 15,000km one puncture.

I also had one Campag rear mech explode. One chain snap, one spoke break and one freehub seize. So statistically I had considerably more chance of a mechanical than a puncture.

fdegrove
Tubbie Guru
Posts: 5851
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 2:20 am
Location: Belgium

by fdegrove

Hi,

I am interested in clinchers due to these 'safety' concern, but love the ride of tubs both up and down the hills.


What "safety concerns" ? You'd be safer all along on tubs than on clinchers anyhow. It's not any harder nor is it more time consuming to swap a tubular or a clincher. As a matter of fact I feel it's easier, less stressful, to swap a tub in the middle of nowhere than a clincher. Especially so when you're alone.

Just don't take "airwise" with you. He's your typical anti-talisman. :mrgreen:

Ciao, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

by Weenie


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