Are custom built wheels actually ever custom built?

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Tinea Pedis
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by Tinea Pedis

mr_tim wrote:which is why few builders will opt to use them any more unless the client understand the compromises they will be accepting with the build. Shame they didn't give you that explanation though.

Precisely why ENVE and Reynolds still use them?

I have given 240's hell racing and generally riding and have not had a stiffness issue nor any other for that matter.


OP - imho I see no issue with you wanting to use 240's. Caveat; I run Campag at home and also like the ability to change freehubs, however I would have no issue picking them if I solely ran Shimano/SRAM.

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mr_tim
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by mr_tim

TP - its a low maintenance hub, which is why builders / manufactures like to recommend them. I think I'd argue there is a healthy profit built into the RRP as well if you were buying in bulk. The internals are good & sealing is excellent which makes it a great trainer, but it is based on certain compromises.

If its left to the builders choice - would they recommend something that might come back with problems - say like the creaking tune hubs of old or plastic internalled extralites, or recommend something that is known to have proven reliability - albeit that it does so in a slightly compromised fashion?


FWIW if it was for training purposes & I was talking over a custom build, I'd suggest the client look at the 350s hub over the 240s - certainly on the rear hub. Its got good build standards, just with heavier parts. If its a trainer wheelset where weight & out & out performance is less of a priority you'd get a durable hub but without the huge premium.

Also for some extra background on hubs generally which might be of assistance to the OP; http://fairwheelbikes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=65&t=6940

FWB - Hubs review- 240s rear;

The 240 hub was included in this review because it is such a dominant force in the wheel industry. So many companies use it as their hub that it has become a sort of "standard" so I thought it would be nice to see how it actually compares to the other boutique stuff. It's not the heaviest, there are 3 others that are heavier, but all of them have much higher static loads, and all of them have much larger bracing angles resulting in a much stiffer/stronger wheel. The DT is competitively priced falling right in the middle and has a very middle of the road static load capacity. It has the smallest DS bracing angle of all the hubs tested, including other interchangeable bodied hubs but at least this provides a decent tension difference of 49%. The DT uses a ratchet drive instead of a standard pawl system, and the ratchet systems seems to have a very good track record for reliability. The hub is easy to overhaul and needs special tools only to remove the splined half of the ratchet system in the body. There are two things about this hub that are very appealing to me. I like that you can easily change from Shimano to Campag and back again in only a couple of moments, of course this comes at the noted reduction in flange spacing. My biggest draw to this hub is the way it's become completely widespread in the industry. This is good for anyone who needs service or parts. You can walk into your local shop and there's a good chance they'll have whatever parts and knowledge are needed to maintain it. Customer service with DT isn't the greatest or the quickest, but luckily as a consumer there won't be many opportunities for you to have to deal with them. The noise in this hub is a bit on the loud side, but not overly so and can be quieted with some lube. On a 1-10 scale for noise with 1 being a silent clutch and 10 being a Tune Mag90, I'd say the DT is a 7 in noise level.

Ron: Definitely a decent reliable hub and at a good weight as well. The bearings are large enough and they rarely need overhauling. Lubing the freehub mechanism is a very easy job. The biggest negative is the less than optimum flange offset on both sides. Plus the price has been creeping up. I've used a lot of these in the past, but doubt I will very often in the future now that the Alchemy, C-4, and Chris King hubs are available. DT sells these pretty cheap for OEM applications, which reduces their value for customs in my opinion.

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Tinea Pedis
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by Tinea Pedis

I certainly know of the review, and whilst there are better hubs out there, none of it means the DT is deserving of the rating you gave it.

Could stiffer wheels be built with different hubs, certainly. Does that mean you cannot still build a very stable wheel with a 240? I don't believe so at all. Especially given the forces a lot of us on here actually put through a wheel.

Plus there's the low maintenance factor, again a real world consideration for a lot of riders whose bike maintenance possibly isn't as up to scratch as it should be.


You're welcome to your opinion, I just think the 240 cops more of a bad wrap then it really deserves.

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Samuel Sanchez Gonzalez
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by Samuel Sanchez Gonzalez

Don't you think the word "custom" is a bit overrated?

Big brand wheels have rims made for the spokes et vice et versa. Rims hole in the right angles, custom for the spoke pattern...
THIS is custom. :thumbup:

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Samuel Sanchez Gonzalez
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by Samuel Sanchez Gonzalez

Tinea Pedis wrote:You're welcome to your opinion, I just think the 240 cops more of a bad wrap then it really deserves.


Call it the "Swiss" factor.
:mrgreen: :mrgreen:

mjduct
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by mjduct

Samuel Sanchez Gonzalez wrote:
Tinea Pedis wrote:You're welcome to your opinion, I just think the 240 cops more of a bad wrap then it really deserves.


Call it the "Swiss" factor.
:mrgreen: :mrgreen:



I think that mainly come from the usage of it as an OEM part on several models.

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jekyll man
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by jekyll man

Whilst bad and rude customer service should never be tolerated, the mantra "the (potential) customer is always right ) should be adhered to. After all this is the guy that might just pay your wages. Bad service just results in lost future business too. If something is a bad idea, he should tell you why and not laugh in your face.Then explain what is a better plan AND WHY....

Ive used Derek in the past (he was a Leloby on here), and i've had no problems with him at all- in fact he's been good with advice like Rob (legs11). maybe you just got the shop skivvy with a hangover (still no excuse)
There is a local wheelbuilder to me with big internet presence (based somewhere in Northwich ;-) ) who basically was the reason i learnt to make my and friends wheels. Shocking customer service and poor builds people only tolerate once...

As for 240s- like TP says- i'd be very surprised if you could tell they are in theory a weaker design. I suspect more 240 bashing is due to the ever increasing retail price, and others being flavour of the month.

narrower flange spacing? well hows that going to hold up on stuff for 9000 series shimano if all the blurb is to be believed?? Somethings got to give somewhere to get those 11 sprockets in, and the DT should already be ready :)
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mrfish
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by mrfish

+1 on above.

DT240s are functionally excellent. Barring having the widest possible flange spacing they are very good hubs. I have not touched mine for 4 years now, despite regular rain, bike washing etc. When I enquired about oiling the ratchet, the advice from the LBS was just leave them alone until they stop working then replace the ratchet or the bearings.

Nonetheless, DT is over-priced for what it is. There are plenty of Taiwanese hubs out there which are perfectly functional for a lot less $. But if you want to look at price alone, there are a lot of other manfacturers whose offerings are out of line...

audiojan
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by audiojan

Yes, they can be completely custom. Just find a builder that you either trust (and then listen to their advise... there's builders that a very passionate and experienced), or a builder that carries exactly what you want and will just build it for you.

Obviously, Wheelsmith doesn't fit in the second category and only you can decide if they fit the first (although, reading you post, I kind of doubt that)
"Suddenly the thought struck me; my floor is someone elses ceiling" - Nils Ferlin

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kac
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by kac

I also have had very good experiences with Fairwheel's custom builds. Very helpful, good communications and advice, no subsequent problems.

KAC

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