Spoke holding tool?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
lemmy999
Posts: 73
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Tennessee

by lemmy999

I was just curious what everyone uses to hold their bladed spokes when truing/building a wheel? I have a small set of needle nose pliers that are smooth and I wrap electrical tape around the jaws. But it is somewhat of a hassle to use because the handles hit the other spokes. Is there something better?

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Boonen
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Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2004 7:33 am
Location: Europe

by Boonen

I have used something very similar to this little tool from Sapim. I don't know who made the one I use, but it's really nothing special and you could easily make something like this yourself, just make sure that the surface that holds the spoke is big enough so it prevents the spoke from 'tearing' or getting damaged by the tool.

Hope this is of any help.

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http://www.sapim.be/index.php?st=products&sub=racetools


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Juanmoretime
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Location: Urbana, Illinois

by Juanmoretime

Since it is not something I do very oftern I just use a 3" adjustable wrench.
RESIDENT GRUMPY OLD MAN.

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Taz
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Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2005 10:19 am
Location: Greece

by Taz

What I have done is cut a groove with a saw into a piece of plastic. It does the job perfectly, is very easy to make, costs nothing and does not damage the spokes.

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divve
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by divve

The nice part about a round tool such as from Sapim is that you can keep it around the top half of your finger. It makes adjustment from spoke to spoke very convenient.

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bb46
Posts: 361
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:45 pm

by bb46

I use the Knipex plier wrench which has flat jaws like a Crecent wrench. Twist resist is ok too. The nice thing about a plier tool is that you can use the plier to gently flip from spoke to spoke without letting go of the spoke wrench or having to realign the bladed tool and fit it into the slot, which makes the build go really fast. But I have used a Sapim tool too and it works.
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Auk
Posts: 706
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 4:40 pm

by Auk

I use either a alu. or carbon 10mm stem spacer with a groove cut with a dremel disc. Basically the same thing as the Sapim tool.

lemmy999
Posts: 73
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Tennessee

by lemmy999

So is the groove in the spacer (or the sapim tool) cut all the way through, or just part of the way through? looks like i could make that from a piece of PVC or the carbon steerer i cut off of my easton fork.

rruff
Shop Owner
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Location: Alto, NM

by rruff

lemmy999 wrote: Is there something better?
You could just overshoot 90 degrees and turn back... I've not had a problem with that. Good lube on the threads probably helps, though.

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divve
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by divve

rruff wrote: You could just overshoot 90 degrees and turn back... I've not had a problem with that. Good lube on the threads probably helps, though.


Not very convenient with thin bladed spokes such a CX-Rays. Also, as tension becomes higher the chance of the spoke yielding from twisting increases.

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ejm
Posts: 179
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 2:06 am
Location: Western Australia

by ejm

mavic wheels and campagnolo wheels which are pre built with aero spokes come with a black nylon tool similar to the sapim tool.

Most bike shops would have them hanging around in teh workshop from bikes that they've sold with mavic wheels as OEM fitment... or wheelsets they've sold...

I'm sure you could pick them up for a couple of bucks that way...


cheers,
erik
Visiting Southwest Western Australia? Visit our store, Crank'n Cycles, in Collie!

Auk
Posts: 706
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 4:40 pm

by Auk

lemmy999 wrote:So is the groove in the spacer (or the sapim tool) cut all the way through, or just part of the way through? looks like i could make that from a piece of PVC or the carbon steerer i cut off of my easton fork.



The groove is just deep enough to fit the bladed spoke in. Your idea of using the extra carbon spacer or pvc is exactly what I did.

Rascal
Posts: 268
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 9:20 pm
Location: California, USA

by Rascal

4" adjustable wrench - electrical tape on jaws to protect spoke. Simple, works great.
"You can't get there from here"

lemmy999
Posts: 73
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Tennessee

by lemmy999

I had always used a wrench or pliers with electrical tape in the past. But last night I used the cut off piece of the carbon steerer from my Easton fork. It worked really well and is easier and much faster than pliers. The only problem is that the wall of the steerer is fairly thin, so the spoke just barely fits in there enough. I may try something like PVC with a thicker wall in the future.

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