ripped tubular...

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
FilmAt11
Posts: 306
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:35 am

by FilmAt11

I skidded to avoid a collision and was surprised how quickly I wore through a corsa clincher. It looked like yours. Still love those tires, but they’re not made for skiddin’!

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Calnago
Posts: 8172
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Since we're sharing....
Was cruising down the boulevard at a good clip, on the wheel of a friend, when some kid decides to cross the street in front of him. He had to slam on the brakes, and I narrowly missed going into his rear wheel. No children were harmed, but my relatively new Veloflex Carbon was retired to a display showing it's cross section of layers...
Image

That must have been some fancy water bottle you felt the need to slow down so quickly for.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

by Weenie


addictR1
Posts: 1661
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:11 am

by addictR1

Calnago wrote:Since we're sharing....
Was cruising down the boulevard at a good clip, on the wheel of a friend, when some kid decides to cross the street in front of him. He had to slam on the brakes, and I narrowly missed going into his rear wheel. No children were harmed, but my relatively new Veloflex Carbon was retired to a display showing it's cross section of layers...
Image

That must have been some fancy water bottle you felt the need to slow down so quickly for.
It was just a regular polar bottle, but I still have 40+ miles left to go and climb through.. so kinda needed it. But yea looking back at it now it would’ve been cheaper to replace a bottle rather than a new veloflex Carbon. Lol.

But on the plus side.. more hands on experience with installing tubs and changing out on the road.
Lesson learned Image


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Calnago
Posts: 8172
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Or... just take your time slowing down and go back to pick up your water bottle nice and easy like.

I hear ya on the good to get practice changing a tubular on the road however. But that goes for any tire change, or flat fix, regardless of whether it’s a tubular, tubeless, or regular clincher. It’s one thing to have the stuff and another to know how to use it. My first learning scenario came years ago on a ride with my girlfriend. Close enough to home that I just told her to go on ahead and I wanted to stay and change the tubular. Ha. Well, if anything I learned to never fear a rolled off tubular. It was so hard to remove that I eventually gave up and just called her to come pick my up. Learned I needed a little pry tool to get started and just needed to learn the technique a bit better. Now it doesn’t even phase me, but I think I’ve only had to actually change one tubular on the road since then. With sealant it’s usually just a matter of squirting about 10-15ml of sealant in the tire. And pretty much off I go. I would say that aside from the actual gluing, tubulars are easier to contend with in the event of a problem on the road than tubeless.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

addictR1
Posts: 1661
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:11 am

by addictR1

Calnago wrote:Or... just take your time slowing down and go back to pick up your water bottle nice and easy like.

I hear ya on the good to get practice changing a tubular on the road however. But that goes for any tire change, or flat fix, regardless of whether it’s a tubular, tubeless, or regular clincher. It’s one thing to have the stuff and another to know how to use it. My first learning scenario came years ago on a ride with my girlfriend. Close enough to home that I just told her to go on ahead and I wanted to stay and change the tubular. Ha. Well, if anything I learned to never fear a rolled off tubular. It was so hard to remove that I eventually gave up and just called her to come pick my up. Learned I needed a little pry tool to get started and just needed to learn the technique a bit better. Now it doesn’t even phase me, but I think I’ve only had to actually change one tubular on the road since then. With sealant it’s usually just a matter of squirting about 10-15ml of sealant in the tire. And pretty much off I go. I would say that aside from the actual gluing, tubulars are easier to contend with in the event of a problem on the road than tubeless.
Yup I always bring a pry tool with me so had to use that. But that just means I did a good glue job.

When using sealant, after filling it, do you put the puncture hole down on the ground and then pump it up? Or it doesn’t matter?


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Calnago
Posts: 8172
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Firstly, I don’t use sealant until/unless I get a puncture. If I do get a puncture, the first thing I do is try to locate the exact spot of the puncture and look for any foreign piece of glass or whatever that caused the puncture and may still be embedded in the tire. I have a teensy SwissArmy knife in my kit that will help me get it out if needed. And then I’ll remove the valve core and place the valve at either the 5 or 7 o’clock position. I use the little hose supplied with Orange Seal (Regular) to squeeze about 10-15ml of sealant in the tire, then replace the valve core, then inflate just a bit with a small hand pump (Lezyne Road Drive). I don’t use C02. Then just rotate the tire so that the puncture spot is at the bottom. I let it sit a minute or so before I start to pump it up. Hopefully that does the trick. It almost always works. Even if it loses a bit of air in the beginning, it seems that it will ultimately seal up completely and last for the life of the tire. I do have a spare with my under the seat always, but it’s just there since I think it’s silly to not have a backup for the inevitable. But it’s extremely rare that it’s needed. It’s pretty easy actually. Clean too.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

defride
Posts: 126
Joined: Fri May 09, 2014 4:26 pm

by defride

Ouch, looks like I got away with it.

Glued a new Vittoria Graphene for a race as the previous was looking tired, tested it and set out the following day

250+ guys on a 2 1/2 lane road that suddenly became a 2 lane road 5 miles in = carnage. Mass pile up in front of me, stopped touching the rider in front and the guy behind tapped me but I was first not to go down. Flat spotted the rear over a similar area to Calnago, very peived after the race, hey ho, could have been worse!

amngwlvs
Posts: 136
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2018 2:45 pm
Location: Barrie, Ontario

by amngwlvs

This seems unbelievable to me... As a guy who's never ridden tubs are they really that delicate that one emergency stop will destroy a tire? I've made an emergency stop from 65-70km/h to zero to avoid going over a guard rail on a hairy descent and other than a flat spot on my clincher and needing to clean a duece out of my shorts all was well.
2018 Giant TCR Advanced Pro 0 Disc
2015 Giant Propel Advanced 2
2013 Trek 520

mattr
Posts: 4606
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

amngwlvs wrote:
Mon May 06, 2019 9:50 pm
This seems unbelievable to me... As a guy who's never ridden tubs are they really that delicate that one emergency stop will destroy a tire? I've made an emergency stop from 65-70km/h to zero to avoid going over a guard rail on a hairy descent and other than a flat spot on my clincher and needing to clean a duece out of my shorts all was well.
Depends on the model, the same model clincher/tub will behave in exactly the same way.

amngwlvs
Posts: 136
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2018 2:45 pm
Location: Barrie, Ontario

by amngwlvs

mattr wrote:
Tue May 07, 2019 6:09 am
Depends on the model, the same model clincher/tub will behave in exactly the same way.
That's what I figured - just wasn't sure if I was missing something here. Thanks for the reply.
2018 Giant TCR Advanced Pro 0 Disc
2015 Giant Propel Advanced 2
2013 Trek 520

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