Anyone still have a steel bike?

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themidge
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by themidge

A Columbus Minimal fork will certainly fit, but you'll need a new headset and stem.
You can get threadless headsets for 1" steerer's quite easily, ranging from an £11 Ritchey to £130 for a nice shiny Chris King.
1" threadless* stems do exist, if you can find a Cinelli Grammo it would go rather well with the frame, but it might be easier (and probably stiffer) to use any 1 1/8th" stem and use a shim.

* not that quill stems are threaded, it's just the best way to make the distinction.

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thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

Been doing some light reading. The colombus for will work with a 1" FSA head set I found for cheap. I saw a video where the guy had what I'd assume is the "shim" you stated to run the 1 1/8" stem off the 1" threadless fork. Thank you guys for the useful info.
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cadence90
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by cadence90

Regarding thedanplasse's Bianchi, I am completely in agreement with ultimobici and others advising to not change the original fork.

What, you spend a a lot of money to buy a new Columbus Minimal 1" fork + 1" headset + shim (OK, cheap, but still...) + stem + bars...to achieve...what, exactly?

Certainly not a better ride (especially on such a small frame), possibly a worse ride, and you throw out the beauty and elegance of the original, color-matched fork and clean quill stem? Why? It makes no sense to me, and there are plenty of other (better) places to spend that money.
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thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

If I change forks I wouldn't be throwing out anything. I personally do not like the look of the quill type stem or how thin the original fork is. This out of the whole "build" I'm contemplating is solely aesthetic. It's something I've wanted to do since I bought the bike. I briefly considered an adapter but I like the look of a beefier fork.
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Wookski
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by Wookski

thedanplasse wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 3:14 pm
Although I could get Chorus if the savings are worth not getting Record.
Super Record for the win! It says “super” which is the coolest thing about it.

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

I think I'm going to go with Chorus, personally.
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themidge
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by themidge

Before you swap out the forks, you might want to consider how you're going to get your handlebars in the same position. It's all very well jacking up a quill stem, but you'll have way too many spacers with a threadless setup. Aesthetically, unless you can slam the them (like on @Wookski's bike) I think staying with the quill stem might be the better-looking option.

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

That has crosses my mind, But I wouldn't mind slamming it, or at least running a spacer. This is all hypothetical. I may not even build the bike, It's all a feeler at this point.

This frame isnt sacred for me though, it's not anything special or revolutionary. Fact of the matter is it was a cheaper craigslist purchase to get me into cycling. I like the bike but I would like it more if components were more up-to-date. I just want it to look the way I want it to look (ie" Fork, Stem, bars, and wheels) and ride the way I want it to ride (campy chorus, and wheels).

I'll start with the cheaper mods (stem, fork, and bars) first. If I don't end up liking it I can return it to the way it was before dropping the money on Chorus, and wheels.

Also not trying to argue, Just stating my points, while taking in all of the points I've recieved here (which I've taken into consideration), so I thank everyone who've chimed in thus far.
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joejack951
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by joejack951

themidge wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 3:49 pm
Before you swap out the forks, you might want to consider how you're going to get your handlebars in the same position. It's all very well jacking up a quill stem, but you'll have way too many spacers with a threadless setup. Aesthetically, unless you can slam the them (like on @Wookski's bike) I think staying with the quill stem might be the better-looking option.
Modern bars generally have a flat transition into the hoods unlike vintage bars which angle down toward the hoods. Coupled with the fact that many/most vintage bikes were set up for riding mostly on the drops, when converting a vintage frame to modern components you'll likely want the tops of the bars significantly lower than where they used to be. I know I did which was a big reason why I designed my own headset allowing me to get the bars nice and low, a position unattainable with a quill stem.

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

In all honesty, I'd like to emulate the fork/bar setup wookski has. It looks right. Nice, and clean. That is all.
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themidge
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by themidge

joejack951 wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:30 pm
Modern bars generally have a flat transition into the hoods unlike vintage bars which angle down toward the hoods. Coupled with the fact that many/most vintage bikes were set up for riding mostly on the drops...
Sure, but the bars on this Bianchi are already angled such that the levers are more or less level with the tops. There are definitely going to be spacers involved with this planned threadless conversion.
thedanplasse wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 3:14 pm
Image
I mean, tell me this frame isn't a little long and low. Look at all that seatpost and gooseneck!

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

I almost want to buy the stuff just to see if it could be done using just the one spacer I think it'd need with different bars..
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joejack951
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by joejack951

themidge wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:05 pm
Sure, but the bars on this Bianchi are already angled such that the levers are more or less level with the tops. There are definitely going to be spacers involved with this planned threadless conversion.

I mean, tell me this frame isn't a little long and low. Look at all that seatpost and gooseneck!
There is so much wrong with that handlebar setup it is hard for me to draw any conclusions from it :)

In all seriousness, I do have to wonder how much that position has been optimized or is it simply what could be able achieved with the available components. Obviously, the drop portion of the handlebar is far from ideal. They are borderline unusable if you ask me. That bike has a pretty short head/steerer tube which means there is very likely little up and down adjustment available for the quill stem. It could be as low as possible already, limited by the butting inside of the steerer tube. My wife rides a similar size frame so I've encountered a similar problem before. The handlebar reach is also quite long. With some short and shallow modern bars set a little lower than shown, a similar position could be achieved while maintaining usable tops and drops.

If someone wanted to duplicate that exact setup with a threadless stem, then sure, they are going to need spacers. I just don't see why they'd want to.

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

Believe it or not, I've angled the bars down further than the previous owner had them. I ride primarily on the hoods, and rarely on the drops. Plus like I had previously stated I'm new to the sport just getting into it last spring. I bought the bike the previous fall to get outside more. So please pardon my ignorance.
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Calnago
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by Calnago

You’re not ignorant, just learning. I would hazard a guess that the frame may simply be on the small side for you. So you may be chasing something that you’ll never fully achieve with that frame.
Your saddle is tilted down, you’ve turned the bars up (presumably to get the hoods higher since you rarely ride in the drops anyway). Those bars aren’t designed to be in that position you have them and they also probably don’t play very well with Campy levers. And you’ve already got what looks to be a sizeable drop from saddle to bars as it is. Anyway, all part of the learning process.
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