Focus Izalco Max Disc Ultegra R8000 di2

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brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

beanbiken wrote:
Wed Nov 07, 2018 2:38 am
Looks good..... nice weapon for the Mt's. Mine is similar but rim brakes. My 23 year old son and I plan to start our season of the 7 Peaks with Buller next weekend. 4th year now .............it is fabulous punishment :mrgreen:

BB
Buller is probably one of the better ones to start with too! I was super lucky with the weather as well, hope this rain / snow has moved on for your ride :)
7 Peaks is a fantastic idea to give people the excuse to go do something a little sillier than they otherwise would, like climbing up a bunch of mountains. I'm also loving that each year they run it, it's getting a little bit better organised. Look out for the tiny signs which are up on Mt Buller to tell you how far to go / your current elevation.

brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

I was finding the Elite Vico cage a fraction tight and my analysis showed it may be the bottle cage bolts interfering with the entry and exit of the bottle.
So, I bought some cheap eBay titanium button-head bolts to solve the problem and add some bling factor.
The bolts appear to have made the bottle cage use 'easier', however the production quality on the bolts leaves a lot to be desired. One of the heads, which are T25, could only be turned with an allen key as the T25 bit wouldn't fit into the head. Additionally the threads end about 2mm away from the head of the bolt, not that it matters since there's no threads needed there for this use case, but just mentioning it for accuracy.

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by Weenie


brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

Got away for a couple of days and rode up Lake Mountain and the notorious Mt Baw Baw.

Lake Mountain was gorgeous to ride, slightly variable gradients with nothing too crazy, some nice views and a flowing decent back into town where you really only needed to use your brakes for the T-junction.

Mt Baw Baw on the other hand:
For those that don't know: 6km averaging 11% with a max of 21% and 1km over 14%, some say it's the hardest climb in Australia to just get to the top of.
Strava Segment: https://www.strava.com/segments/609777?filter=overall

Man I was wishing for a compact, or hell, just a single-speed conversion, anything to a) give me a lower gear and b) save some more weight!

Only had to stop once to catch my breath on the way up, I thought it was a decent idea to try and maintain a half-reasonable cadence, whereas I should've slowed it down a bit more to keep the HR down and oxygen flowing, at one point higher up, where I was "chatting" with another cyclist who was also stupid enough to give it a crack I was doing ~45 rpm and out of gears.
I ended up stopping a few times on the way back down to let the brakes cool off, I wasn't comfortable descending it at the required 60+ kmph to not use the brakes overly much! I can report back that with a HC climb and trying to keep your speed around 30-40 kmph, even the lock ring holding the rotor on will get quite warm, as will the spider and don't even try touching the braking surface as that was noticeably radiating heat!!!
This is very much a climb to ride a <5kg ultra-weight-weenie bike up and then take a car back down!

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beanbiken
Posts: 712
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:13 pm
Location: Great Southern Land

by beanbiken

brackc wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:47 am

Only had to stop once to catch my breath on the way up
This is very much a climb to ride a <5kg ultra-weight-weenie bike up and then take a car back down!

Image
Yes, been up it twice and down once. Scary coming down for sure. First trip up was as part of a 7 Peaks Domestique event.

On our way up we came across a fellow who had found the Amco rail on his way down. He ended up taking a trip with the Ambo’s.... believe he made a full recovery. We came down on alloy rim brakes, didn’t need to stop but no time to enjoy the descent.

Last year went up with a support vehicle, had lunch at the resort and came down with four wheels. This year will have the sub 5kg WW machine...... and you managed without a full compact crank?!!! Please tell me you had a 30+ tooth cog on the back......

BB
BB

Coffee & carbon

brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

beanbiken wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 8:17 am
brackc wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 6:47 am

Only had to stop once to catch my breath on the way up
This is very much a climb to ride a <5kg ultra-weight-weenie bike up and then take a car back down!

Image
Yes, been up it twice and down once. Scary coming down for sure. First trip up was as part of a 7 Peaks Domestique event.

On our way up we came across a fellow who had found the Amco rail on his way down. He ended up taking a trip with the Ambo’s.... believe he made a full recovery. We came down on alloy rim brakes, didn’t need to stop but no time to enjoy the descent.

Last year went up with a support vehicle, had lunch at the resort and came down with four wheels. This year will have the sub 5kg WW machine...... and you managed without a full compact crank?!!! Please tell me you had a 30+ tooth cog on the back......

BB
Semi-compact I believe is the correct term? ie 52/36 paired with the 'new' 11-30 cassette. Spent 99.9% of the climb in the 36-30 gear!
Then again I'm a relatively fit young cyclist with an estimated FTP of just over 300 watts, I won't quote a more exact number because I tested this on a 'spin' bike which is technically only accurate to +- 10% or so with its power figures, which is a huge margin!
Frankly 36/30 has been fine for me up until the gradient is sustained over ~12% for a period of time, so I didn't enjoy The Meg on Mt Hotham either, but at least you can recover after that one as the gradient then lessens again!

I did have a chat with the woman who was working at the store at the top and she said even her car runs out of gears on the way up as well!

I don't exactly enjoy getting to a speed where I know I won't be able to stop properly, hence 40 kmph was the limit my brain would allow me to go on the way back down, before I might need to change my bibs shorts that is :/

Enjoy the climb on the WW machine, hope you have the legs to match the bike, because I feel like you'll still need them!!!

brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

Serviced the headset today, which was a good excuse to weight everything there, before packing it back in with fresh grease.

Stem: 144g
broken down weights - bolts 16g, face plate 18g, main body 110g

conical headset bearing cover: 24g
spacers (x2 10mm): 14g
top cap and bolt: 14g
top bearing (with split ring): 24g
bottom bearing: 28g

brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

brackc wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 8:24 am
Serviced the headset today, which was a good excuse to weight everything there, before packing it back in with fresh grease.

Stem: 144g
broken down weights - bolts 16g, face plate 18g, main body 110g

conical headset bearing cover: 24g
spacers (x2 10mm): 14g
top cap and bolt: 14g
top bearing (with split ring): 24g
bottom bearing: 28g
After servicing the headset, I noticed the bearings were VERY loose in the frame and was concerned this could be a cause of the brake shuddering I've been experiencing.
I took the bike to yet another bike shop and they shimmed the headset bearings. I've emailed them asking why the frame wasn't replaced under warranty for out of spec bearing seats.
They also noticed the front hub bearings had been overtightened by the first shop and had worn out prematurely (~5,000kms of riding), so they've been replaced.
I'm looking forward to riding the bike next week to see how this has impacted the brake shuddering on hills!

brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

Some new upgrades:
Scales: Ohaus Scout SKX (2.2kg with 0.1g accuracy)
Birzman apogee mini pump - 79.3g
Hutchinson Fusion 5 TR performance - 256.9g / 248.9g measured - 260g claimed

Birzman pump only JUST fits in the Castelli mini saddlebag... which was my goal so I can simply forget its existence, but in the worse case scenario it is actually there.
I haven't tried it out yet, but with 6000kms on tubeless with no punctures before the rear tyre decided to stop holding air (worn out), I'm trusting the cyclingtips review saying that it works.

The Ohaus scales are beautiful and let me cook, dial in the coffee machine and weigh bike parts all on the same damn accurate scale.

reedplayer
Posts: 510
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:10 am

by reedplayer

the birzman apogee mini pump is interesting, because its only 13, 6 cm long. most mini pumps have a length of 16- or 17cm which is just a little bit too long for the common compact saddle bag.
and its affordable. i will try it, thanks for the tip!

brackc
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:07 am

by brackc

reedplayer wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 11:31 pm
the birzman apogee mini pump is interesting, because its only 13, 6 cm long. most mini pumps have a length of 16- or 17cm which is just a little bit too long for the common compact saddle bag.
and its affordable. i will try it, thanks for the tip!
I had the misfortune of trying it out on the second ride, the old "i'll get more life out of the front tyre before replacing" guarantees a puncture is looming.
It worked pretty well to get the tyre back up to ~50psi by the time I was home (tubeless was still slowly leaking air though so 50+psi actual).
The valve attachment is actually smart and works well. Because it's so small with such a short stroke you shouldn't get enough pressure build up in the pump or leverage to damage the valve easily. It will rattle if left to its own devices but is a really tight fit in my Castelli mini saddlebag so wasn't rattling in there.
You can easily add a presta to schrader adapter for a servo, if you're stuck away on a longer ride and need to add extra pressure.

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Birzman pump on new scales

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256.9g now on rear wheel

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248.9g now on front wheel

I aimed for about 30g of sealant in each tyre this time around.

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