Better bike for endurance

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
AJS914
Posts: 3393
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

He seems to be new to cycling and thinks he needs to sit more upright to be comfortable on long rides. Reading between the lines, I think he also just has the fever to buy another bike.

I'm going to recommend:

Read Joe Friel's Cycling Bible on training. It will lay out the basics of training for racing.

Relax about getting dropped in races. Just have fun. It's probably going to take a year of training properly (base miles, intervals, etc) and gaining experience before you have a chance at contesting a race unless you are incredibly gifted in the genetics department.

If you have bike fever and must buy a bike then buy a used bike for your second road bike and get one size larger than you have now. You are in the phase where you are quickly figuring out your fit on a bike. Fit can change as you get more experience, lose weight, gain flexibility, etc. Used bikes sell for pennies on the dollar so I'd go that route.

Increase mileage little by little. A 50 mile ride will be uncomfortable on any bike if the longest you regularly ride is 20 miles. Do those first long rides at your winter base miles pace (zone 1/2). Just turn the pedals at an easy pace where you feel like you could gobble up the miles and ride all day. This will pay dividends in the long run.

by Weenie


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Lelandjt
Posts: 518
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2016 7:10 am

by Lelandjt

07stuntin6r wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 2:12 am
AJS914 wrote:You might get smoked in your first 10 or 20 crits. Don't worry about it. When I first started racing, it took 10 races to kind of figure it and not get dropped.

I'd talk with a good bike fitter about being more comfortable on the bike for longer distances. It may simply take time in the saddle. Core work and stretching also goes a long way to creating comfort in the saddle.
Well I'm sure more saddle time will help, but this bike isn't meant for long rides. I've been fitted to the bike already I don't want to keep re adjusting for long ride then change again for when I crit in the future.

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My bike is basically a "crit bike", aero everything, huge handlebar drop, bare carbon saddle, and no concessions to comfort besides fitting well. I ride it up to 100mi and frequently do 65mi 3 hour rides. "Comfort" and "endurance" bikes are intended for doing longer slower rides than that, like 6 hours in the saddle.
If you can't comfortably ride your bike for 2 hours I'm surprised you can comfortably put down power for a 30 minute crit.

jih
Posts: 247
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:54 pm

by jih

I think we’ve been using too many words here.

Simply: your bike is fine. Ride it until you’re fit enough for the distance.

morrisond
Posts: 938
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 8:34 pm

by morrisond

I would second the idea of just go out and ride. You live in Florida - 50m/80km should only take you about 3-4 hours of pedalling.

Do you have that time available today/tomorrow or on the weekend? Pick a place for coffee or lunch at half distance and just go do it. If you have to stop 5x on the way back to rest or shake something out don't worry about it. If you have a family and don't want to be away that long - set your alarm clock for 6:00 am this weekend and get out there so your back before the day gets going.

I would suggest if you are in Florida your biggest obstacle will be wind. Ride into the wind on the way out when you are fresh and you will feel like a champ on the way back.

Once you get over the mental hump it will be really easy to do longer distances and you'll be able to ride forever and feel like a champ.

Your bike is fine. Good luck and have fun!

morrisond
Posts: 938
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 8:34 pm

by morrisond

Oh - and the other obvious answer - just flip your stem up for longer rides. Don't worry about what it looks like. Soon enough you will be fine with it pointed down.

waltthizzney
Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:35 pm

by waltthizzney

dude, your fat and out of shape. stop worrying about gear and just go ride as much and as long as you can.

07stuntin6r
Posts: 196
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

morrisond wrote:I would second the idea of just go out and ride. You live in Florida - 50m/80km should only take you about 3-4 hours of pedalling.

Do you have that time available today/tomorrow or on the weekend? Pick a place for coffee or lunch at half distance and just go do it. If you have to stop 5x on the way back to rest or shake something out don't worry about it. If you have a family and don't want to be away that long - set your alarm clock for 6:00 am this weekend and get out there so your back before the day gets going.

I would suggest if you are in Florida your biggest obstacle will be wind. Ride into the wind on the way out when you are fresh and you will feel like a champ on the way back.

Once you get over the mental hump it will be really easy to do longer distances and you'll be able to ride forever and feel like a champ.

Your bike is fine. Good luck and have fun!
I'd love to ride after work but I usually don't get home u til 530pm and up at 430am to head to work.

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07stuntin6r
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

waltthizzney wrote:dude, your fat and out of shape. stop worrying about gear and just go ride as much and as long as you can.
Haha out of shape I doubt that. Maybe not in a cyclist body shape with no upper body strength at all. Must be out of shape after I spent a week in Washington hiking the mountains with snow shoes for 8-10hrs a day for a week.

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waltthizzney
Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:35 pm

by waltthizzney

07stuntin6r wrote:
Wed Mar 28, 2018 7:08 pm
waltthizzney wrote:dude, your fat and out of shape. stop worrying about gear and just go ride as much and as long as you can.
Haha out of shape I doubt that. Maybe not in a cyclist body shape with no upper body strength at all. Must be out of shape after I spent a week in Washington hiking the mountains with snow shoes for 8-10hrs a day for a week.

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Dude I am trying to give you advise as someone who races in Cat 2. Until you basically reach the top 90-95% of your potential in terms of fitness and weight whatever bike you are riding does not make a difference. A $1000 bike with a power meter is going to be much more valuable and faster than a $10,000 without one. You are on a website dedicated to the most marginal gains when you have no base to begin with.

The best way to get faster is to keep riding with people faster than you. Find a good group of guys and ride with them as much as possible. Fall in love with the sport, not the gear.

Quit worrying about gear, worry about what you are eating, how you are training. You should be able to get in great shape if you can train 10 hours a week.

AJS914
Posts: 3393
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

07stuntin6r wrote:
Wed Mar 28, 2018 7:05 pm
I'd love to ride after work but I usually don't get home u til 530pm and up at 430am to head to work.
With that kind of schedule you don't have a lot of time to properly train for racing. You might be able to do it if you spend a lot of time on a trainer and get in the longer rides on the weekend but it will be a struggle.

I gave up on amateur racing when I realized that spending 10-15 hours a week training (total time, not hours on the bike) and then another 5-10 hours a week travel time wasn't worth it for the glory of winning a tire. On top of it, I was always racing against guys that could put in twice as much time on the bike.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

The bike matters. It always matters. If it’s not comfortable, then you can’t and won’t get the miles in. I don’t think he’s got “new gear will make all the difference” syndrome. He’s relatively new to the sport and figuring things out. Perhaps the best advice so far is to either flip up the stem you have in n your current bike, but you may need a longer one to go with the flip, then try it out on longer rides to see if it makes it more enjoyable and bearable. There’s no substitute for getting in the miles for sure, but to say any bike will do is kind of shortsighted I think. “Any bike that fits relatively well that allows you to do the miles you need to do” will work might be a better way of putting it. As you ride more, let your body be the judge of how much you start lowering your position and when.
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07stuntin6r
Posts: 196
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

Right I mean I can ride for an hour at most before work for my gym time but that's a out it from mon-fri unless I get a trainer. I realize I need more saddle time. But I don't understand where some of the responses when I'm talking about getting a bike with a more upright position compared to a bike that is used from most as a crit bike.

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bremerradkurier
Posts: 321
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2016 4:18 pm

by bremerradkurier

If you want to get leaner and meaner while not starving, a ketogenic diet high in fat and low in carbs might work for you.

I'm 5'10 and went from 205 to 170 during last year's riding season and after a short adaption time was able to do 40-50 mile group rides with 900 meters of elevation at a 16-17 mph after a bacon and egg breakfast with coconut oil and heavy cream laced coffee drinking nothing but water on the ride.

07stuntin6r
Posts: 196
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

bremerradkurier wrote:If you want to get leaner and meaner while not starving, a ketogenic diet high in fat and low in carbs might work for you.

I'm 5'10 and went from 205 to 170 during last year's riding season and after a short adaption time was able to do 40-50 mile group rides with 900 meters of elevation at a 16-17 mph after a bacon and egg breakfast with coconut oil and heavy cream laced coffee drinking nothing but water on the ride.
I've tried keto....I love my rice and breads. Something about eating fat just seems odd and doesn't feel right lol.

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by Weenie


bremerradkurier
Posts: 321
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2016 4:18 pm

by bremerradkurier

07stuntin6r wrote:
Wed Mar 28, 2018 8:59 pm
bremerradkurier wrote:If you want to get leaner and meaner while not starving, a ketogenic diet high in fat and low in carbs might work for you.

I'm 5'10 and went from 205 to 170 during last year's riding season and after a short adaption time was able to do 40-50 mile group rides with 900 meters of elevation at a 16-17 mph after a bacon and egg breakfast with coconut oil and heavy cream laced coffee drinking nothing but water on the ride.
I've tried keto....I love my rice and breads. Something about eating fat just seems odd and doesn't feel right lol.

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I switched to cauliflower rice and cut way back on bread, which is tough as my German wife bakes awesome whole grain bread with pumpkin and sunflower seeds in it, so I'll just eat a slice or two as a sponge for Kerrygold butter.

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