Removing bearings on a freewheel hub

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nismosr
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 5:15 pm

by nismosr

The bearing on my freehub are bad and need to be change, can I do this myself or should I let my LBS do it for me, and is there a tool that I could buy in removing and installing the bearings. Thank you
- 2018 Colnago V2-R TNMR - Campagnolo SR EPS - Lightweight Meilenstein Schwarz ED - P2Max
- 2017 Colnago Concept CHDB - Campagnolo SR EPS - Bora One 50 - Deda Superzero - Stages
- 2015 Cipollini RB800 - Campagnolo Athena EPS - Bora One 35

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bikerjulio
Posts: 1901
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:38 pm
Location: Welland, Ontario

by bikerjulio

Suggest that information on the hub, brand and vintage might help.
There's sometimes a buggy.
How many drivers does a buggy have?

One.

So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

by Weenie


nismosr
Posts: 1055
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 5:15 pm

by nismosr

sorry it's easton shimano freehub.

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- 2018 Colnago V2-R TNMR - Campagnolo SR EPS - Lightweight Meilenstein Schwarz ED - P2Max
- 2017 Colnago Concept CHDB - Campagnolo SR EPS - Bora One 50 - Deda Superzero - Stages
- 2015 Cipollini RB800 - Campagnolo Athena EPS - Bora One 35

eric
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Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:47 pm
Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
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by eric

If it's like other similar freehubs I have replaced bearings on, the inner bearing is pressed in, then a spacer that fits between the inner races, then the outer bearing is pressed in.
You can remove the outer bearing by gently forcing the spacer to one side just enough to use a drift to tap on the inner race (from the inside). When it moves it will no longer trap the spacer and you can move the spacer to the other side and tap that side. You don't want to cock the bearing in the bore so you need to tap tow sides and keep an eye on how straight it is. Once you get it out, remove the spacer and then the inner bearing if that's the bad one.

To install you need sockets or tubing that is the same diameter as the outer race of each bearing. If you hammer on the inner races or seals you will damage the bearing. Removing the bearings often damages them.

Seat the inner bearing, then install the spacer, then install the outer, making sure that the spacer is in place.

Valbrona
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Location: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

by Valbrona

You need a cartridge bearing removal tool - of the right size to match the internal diameter of the two cartridge bearings in that freehub - a small hammer, and a small punch to remove the bearings.

And then you need a way of installing new cartridge bearings back into the freehub. The proper way is to use a bearing press, but these are expensive bits of kit. Knocking them in some way with a hammer runs the risk of damaging them.

Are you sure they are worn? How do they feel when you turn them with your fingers? Sometimes with new freehubs the bearings have not been seated correctly. It may be a slight misalignment of one of the bearings if we are talking a new freehub - often the bearings move freely in your hands but when you re-assemble the wheel they bind slightly.

Oswald
Posts: 792
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2004 10:11 pm

by Oswald

nismosr wrote:sorry it's easton shimano freehub.


Where are you from? I have one of these for sale, for an Easton R4 hub. It has been used, but isn't worn. I replaced it with a 9 speed body to be able to use a junior cassette.
I'm from Belgium.

eric
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Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:47 pm
Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA
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by eric

Valbrona wrote:You need a cartridge bearing removal tool - of the right size to match the internal diameter of the two cartridge bearings in that freehub - a small hammer, and a small punch to remove the bearings.


You only need the hammer and punch. Doing it that way can damage the bearing but if it's dead anyhow that's no problem.
Valbrona wrote:And then you need a way of installing new cartridge bearings back into the freehub. The proper way is to use a bearing press, but these are expensive bits of kit. Knocking them in some way with a hammer runs the risk of damaging them.


Using a socket or piece of tubing that bears on the outer race works well. Tap it in with a small hammer. Putting the bearing in the freezer for a half hour first will make it easier.

You want to avoid hammering or putting pressure on the inner race. That puts the force through the balls and the balls may get a small flat spot. That will get worse over time and eventually kill the bearing. This is why driving the bearing out by hammering on the inner race damages the bearing.

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Cheers!
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by Cheers!

do what others have said and use a hammer and drift (aka punch) to tap out the bearing. Prop the hub in a vice wrapped in a towel or if you don't have a vice, you might be able to improvise by sitting on the floor and 2 pieces of wood of each thickness.

When you have the new bearing, you can use the old bearing as the guide to push in the new bearing. Again a vice would work much better here. If you don't have the vice. Try going to Canadian Tire and buying a big long bolt, some big fender washers, and some nuts. You will need minimum of 1 bolt, 2 big washers, and 2 nuts. Then you put the washer at one end, and the other big washer against the hold bearing, 2 wrenches and draw the new bearing into the bore.

It will help to add a bit of oils around the new bearing or grease to help it slide in.

Butcher
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by Butcher

I have a Easton Campagnolo freehub [R4 hub] and there is a circlip that holds the inner bearing to the housing. If you attempt to 'hammer' out the bearings, you will just destroy the entire assembly. You need to move the sleeve [between the bearings] so you can use a drift to knock out the outer bearing. Yeah, you might destroy the bearing, but that is what you are replacing anyway.

Once you get the outer bearing out, then you can get to the circlip that is holding the inner bearing. You might as well modify the inner sleeve so you can gain access to the outer bearing before you reassemble with new bearings. It will just make life easier the next time.

by Weenie


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