Beginner HRM pacing question

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nemeseri
Posts: 675
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:40 pm

by nemeseri

So I just bought my first cycling computer (Edge 510) and I started to record my rides with HRM. I set my resting, max and FT HR and my zones based on Joe Friel's book as a start (Zone 5's bottom is my FTHR). Obviously I have a lot of questions.

I'm doing the death ride in the Sierra for the very first time (129 miles / 15,000 ft). While I did similar rides before and completed numerous centuries with no problem, this ride is kind of special.

Without a computer I usually don't have a plan or pacing for standard centuries. I hit them hard and based on the profile I finish them either easily or slowing down at the end. I love climbing and I love to climb fast.

I did some testing and found out that usually I like to fluctuate (95-105%) around my FTHR during long climbs (45+ min). With shorter climbs I like to hit them hard and I'm fine to stay slightly above my FTHR quite long.

In the death ride, I know that I can't go ahead and do it without pacing myself. In theory I know that I should be in Zone 2 or 3. I tried this on a shorter climb and it felt sooo slow and lame that it was super hard to keep my HR that low.

How should I pace myself during this ride? Would it be a mistake to keep myself floating in Zone 4 during climbs? Should I start out super slow and see how I'm doing after 1-2 climbs? Any tips would be appreciated.

Everyone
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2015 11:02 am

by Everyone

Sorry can't help with your question but I wanted to ask how you managed to set your FT in your garmin? Did you just set that as your max HR or something different?

nemeseri
Posts: 675
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:40 pm

by nemeseri

Everyone wrote:Sorry can't help with your question but I wanted to ask how you managed to set your FT in your garmin? Did you just set that as your max HR or something different?


I did a 30 minute climbing test and used the average HR during the last 20 mins. Since then I confirmed it with a longer climb. I used the last 90-95% of the climb and it confirmed my previous test result. Then I used the table in Joe Friel's book to get my zones and set them up in my garmin using the method where you only need to type in the BPM. I only use 5 zones because garmin doesn't support more (like friel's 5A/5B/5C), but it's fine for pacing probably.

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Tapeworm
Posts: 2585
Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 10:39 am

by Tapeworm

There many possible answers to your questions, of which the definitive answer is: It depends.

It depends on: your training goals, training load for micro and marco cycles, recovery from the training, whether you enjoy that sort of ride or not...

Lots of factors need to be accounted for.
"Physiology is all just propaganda and lies... all waiting to be disproven by the next study."
"I'm not a real doctor; But I am a real worm; I am an actual worm." - TMBG

jeffy
Posts: 1255
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:51 pm

by jeffy

once you have your LTHR number there are lots of online calcs to work out your zones (inc free training peaks)
remember to select Friel Cycling (running has different zones)
- then just manually enter into Garmin head unit (these don't seem to synch between Head unit, app and connect website -
so if you use them all set them all identically - separately)

i tend to start climbs @ mid z3 and gradually increase intensity to the border of z4/5, ~4 or 5 beats above LTHR (above low z5) i notice a decrease in power when it is sustained above a certain length (specialsekret proprietary data aka embarrassing!)

but that is all dependant on the climb length. one very long rides on the flat i will ride mid-to-top of zone 2 and long climb zone 3& low/mid 4 for the majority

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