Plant-based diet for cycling - tips and tricks?

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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AeroObsessive
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by AeroObsessive

Oh and my biases are based on the data.

From just one of the studies, just to make life easier:-

3.2.1. Daily Protein Requirements

The AND, DC, and ACSM all recommend protein ingestion for athletes in the range of 1.2–2.0 g/kg/day [8], with the ISSN recommending 1.4–2.0 g/kg/day [9]. Strength and power athletes are typically recommended to consume in the higher range and endurance athletes the lower range, based on individual needs. Temporary ingestion of higher quantities during intense training may provide additional benefit [9,27]. Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is upregulated for 24 h following exercise and is due to the increased sensitivity to oral protein intake during this time [8,29]. This increased absorption provides an ideal time to optimize protein intake in order to maintain muscle mass after endurance exercise, as prolonged endurance exercise may induce a catabolic state and resultant muscle breakdown [8,9,30]. Timing and dose are also shown to be important; 0.25–0.3 g/kg of a quality protein source (see below) in the immediate 0–2 h post exercise provides approximately 10 g of essential amino acids (EAA) (which maximally stimulate MPS and the MPS associated signaling proteins mTOR, p70s6k, Akt needed for protein synthesis) [8,9,28,30]. Of note, either 0–2 h post-exercise or immediate pre-exercise protein intake both yield similar benefits (in non-ultra-endurance activities) [9,30]. Clinicians can educate athletes regarding this useful fact and let the decision be a matter of athlete preference and GI tolerance.

warthog101
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by warthog101

The thread was started by a bloke who developed high cholesterol readings.
He changed his diet to address that.
We are now arguing advice about protein consumption for athletic performance.
Unsurprisingly the OP doesn't seem to have posted much more.

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AeroObsessive
Posts: 163
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:42 am

by AeroObsessive

warthog101 wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 10:33 pm
The thread was started by a bloke who developed high cholesterol readings.
He changed his diet to address that.
We are now arguing advice about protein consumption for athletic performance.
Unsurprisingly the OP doesn't seem to have posted much more.
Maybe because people started posting nonsensical whimsical stuff above excessive protein intake and longevity.

warthog101
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Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2013 10:05 am

by warthog101

Maybe others posted insulting nonsense.
Either way as a source of information on vegetarian diets, the thread appears derailied.

tjvirden
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by tjvirden

warthog101 wrote:
Sun Oct 24, 2021 11:25 pm
Maybe others posted insulting nonsense.
Either way as a source of information on vegetarian diets, the thread appears derailied.
I don't think it has been derailed as such - there was anecdote and myth right from the start, with a minority of contributions involving something of substance (information, as opposed to noise). Nutrition needs to be studied scientifically and even then it's not at all straightforward to apply it to individuals, precisely because of the huge range of individual variation in all aspects of diet.

In my opinion, "The Plant-Based Cyclist" is a good source of information to start with, exactly because of its combination of practical application with academic (science) backing. Many so-called professionals would do well to read it, especially those who profess medical expertise.

warthog101
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by warthog101


tjvirden wrote:
In my opinion, "The Plant-Based Cyclist" is a good source of information to start with, exactly because of its combination of practical application with academic (science) backing. Many so-called professionals would do well to read it, especially those who profess medical expertise.
Yes it is reasonable.
There is also "no meat athlete" and the "no meat athlete cookbook"

Dylan Johnson has a bit of info too and does some you tube videos that may be worth a look.

Plenty of dietary and health focussed stuff available online.
Also quite a bit material with less of an athletic focus.

VvM
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2021 9:16 am

by VvM

This podcast has a couple of recent episodes related to plant based diet. Might be interesting for some.

https://thelongmunch.podbean.com/

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Lewn777
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by Lewn777

Back to the original topic: How to achieve your highest potential as a cyclist and be plant based.

1. Don't worry about it. Plant based athletes suffer nil vs meat included diets. A plant based diet for endurance sport as at least equal or superior to a meat and diary or vegetarian, so long as you have a varied enough diet.
2. You can try supplementing B12 and vit D, but probably everyone should.
3. Don't try to be vegan and eat low quality foods such as exclusively eating processed foods, under-eating, or being sedentary.

andrewbn42
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by andrewbn42

To actually address the OP, I found that a few things help.
When you are starting, track calories you burn and replenish them properly. You don’t need to do this very long, just enough to recalibrate your perceptions. I also made sure that I ate a variety of foods to make it so I an less likely to be deficient in a single nutrient.
I am a person who is capable of eating huge amounts of food, so the higher fiber content of plant based diet has helped me with hunger between meals. I also didn’t change the general structure of my meals, and I make sure that there is a higher protein food item, whether that is beans, lentils, tofu, Tempe, etc. I also choose versions of food that naturally have more nutrients, like whole grain, less processed, higher fiber sources. By taking this approach, I find that I am able to get more to an 150g of protein on a daily basis, so I stopped worrying about getting enough. I occasionally use b12 supplements, a recovery drink after a big day, but That would be only on a 2 session training day or an interval ride that exceeds 3 hours. I have not done any research on this, but I believe that by eating mostly homemade foods with less processed ingredients from an array of sources I’m hitting the necessary nutrients and sufficient calories to perform and be healthy.
iggg wrote:
Tue Aug 17, 2021 8:16 pm
Some time ago , I decided to try a plant-based diet. The reason for it was a blood test that showed very unhealthy cholesterol levels. I didn't want to go on a medication for the rest of my life, so figured it was worth to give this diet a try. Today I received the results of my second blood test - cholesterol level is less than a half of what it used to be - yay.

For those of you who tried (or are on) a plant-based diet - is there any advise you can share? Things to watch for? It's quite a big life change, and I am curious if there are ways to make it a bit easier on yourself. For example, one thing I already discovered through an unpleasant experience is I have to watch my protein intake, as it's too easy to not eat enough grams per day.

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GonaSovereign
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by GonaSovereign

Plant-based diets are great for athletes. There are plenty of examples of high-performance plant-based athletes. I'm a mediocre amateur plant-based athlete who wins the occasional race, so my diet isn't slowing me down.

Tracking your nutrients and caloric intake is a fine idea, but know that if you eat a varied diet of whole foods you'll get everything you need to perform well. Cooking for yourself solves most of the problems associated with processed garbage foods.

The hard part is for most people is likely going to be overcoming old habits, assuming you need animal protein to be healthy (nope) and that it tastes good (maybe, but consider the cost).

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