looking to mix things up this season: long rides with a lunch break?

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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AJS914
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by AJS914

The latest Velonews Fast Talk podcast covered this. They basically to not take a long break during your long rides, that is if you are trying to make certain adaptations you get from long endurance rides.

But if you are on a long adventure ride, do whatever feels good.

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

so I've tried it twice last week - do note it's still winter here, and I'm basically just starting to ride this year. nevertheless I did two nearly 120km rides with a lunch break (1st ride after 60, 2nd ~80 km)

the result - I absolutely hated every second after the break. sure, it's a killer distance for me after just a handful or rides since the end of November but then I took it easy, and felt really, really good about it right untill the stop. of course digestive-wise it was nice and all, but my body just showed me a middle finger after I sat back on the saddle... of course I didn't expect the ride to be all peachy, but damn legs get stiff after after a while in a chair. perhaps finding a hotel offering a 'traveller package' (2-3 hr stay) and a nice, able masseuse... OK, that's a completely different fantasy... but as far as making long rides with long breaks go, I probably won't try it again.
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by Weenie


Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

It's just fitness. I ride long enough that I cannot carry enough food and have to stop. Sometimes it's quick, but I have also chilled out in restaurants for 30 -45 minutes. I've been trapped in a refugio for 2 hours with 100 km before and after. First few pedal strokes aren't the best but things start to flow in a few minutes. Do regular 6 hour rides over the next couple months and report back. I'll bet it will be a non issue by then.

HTFU. - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unkIVvjZc9Y
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

as far as eating go, 5-6 hrs sure does require stopping, there's no way around it. afaik the best option for me is to grab a hot dog/chicken sandwich at a gas station (up to 3-5 minute break) and eat it on the go - that's what I used to do, and the result was almost always a hurried up restroom break.. making longer, 'sitting' breaks sucks, I knew it before and my little not-entirely-valid experiment (yup, my fitness as of today isn't great) kinda confirmed it.

I might play with different diet prior a ride, but that would turn my food habits upside down, and that's not quite what I'm looking for.. guess I gotta accept the perks and perhaps hope my belly adopts with time.
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jorryt
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by jorryt

I understand your problem. When I take a break longer then 10 minutes my body already is in recovery mode. Well so it feels like. But anything under a 3,5-4 hours the only food I consume is a honey/peanut bar. When my rides get longer or past my regular lunch time I pack a small version of my lunch. So for 6 hours I pack 4 sandwiches with chocolate paste.

If I stop for a long break my digestive system also starts working so I have bad cramps the last hour. Above prevents that.

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

I've spoken with this really nice nutritionist gal today, and she said I gotta lay off the sugar during rides - like, almost completely. if I eat 'proper' breakfast - for me, on a riding day it means eggs, bread with jam or cheese.. or both, some cookies, plus coffee with sugar - then I shouldn't eat any more sugar, apart from a banana maybe and the 'sporting liquid' which contatins bits of this and bits of that. she said a hot dog/chicken sandwich isn't a bad idea if I develop a taste for it (there's always some sugar in them anyway), and if I limit sugar my belly should cope better with such 'larger' meals too.

I gotta say I suspected too much sugar might be one of key issues, and I will try to stay away from it and see what happens. now in the off season, while I've few disposable kgs of fat to burn I don't think it's gonna be a big issue, but I wonder what about summer climbing days - when I'll get all skinny, and will need regular fuel intakes, that will give me instant kick... but for now I'm putting all that sticky-licky stuff aside. already boiled some eggs for my early morning ride :mrgreen:
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AJS914
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by AJS914

Try that protocol I posted on page 1. Better yet, listen to the podcast. I literally went from the back of the group to hanging with some of the faster guys on my Saturday group ride and breaking all my PRs.

A hot dog sounds like the worst kind of high performance fuel to eat on a ride or actually to eat anytime. I'm surprised a nutritionist would say it's ever ok.

I would add a big dose of low GI food like oatmeal to the breakfast. Rides are carb dependent. Low GI carbs fuel the body for a longer period of time. Mixing in some protein and fat in the breakfast lowers the GI even more.

Sugar during a ride is definitely beneficial. I think it needs to be used strategically. It also depends on the goals of the ride. If it's a long low intensity adventure ride then you can eat bananas, sandwiches, and lower GI foods.

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

well, she said - I quote - "if during big effort I develop a taste for something, then I can eat it". I smiled and asked about a hot dog and she said "if you feel like it, sure". it wasn't that kind of conversation where I ask how to gain an extra edge, just a casual chat about this and that.

what you said about the 'protocol' kinda fits what I read once (not related to sport) about "healthy mornings", that allow body to work properly and simply way more *better* throughout the day. there was something about a glass of water with honey, some herbs etc. I guess it won't hurt to try it out too :thumbup:
Last edited by tymon_tm on Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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dim
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by dim

tymon_tm wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:10 pm
I've spoken with this really nice nutritionist gal today, and she said I gotta lay off the sugar during rides - like, almost completely. if I eat 'proper' breakfast - for me, on a riding day it means eggs, bread with jam or cheese.. or both, some cookies, plus coffee with sugar - then I shouldn't eat any more sugar, apart from a banana maybe and the 'sporting liquid' which contatins bits of this and bits of that. she said a hot dog/chicken sandwich isn't a bad idea if I develop a taste for it (there's always some sugar in them anyway), and if I limit sugar my belly should cope better with such 'larger' meals too.

I gotta say I suspected too much sugar might be one of key issues, and I will try to stay away from it and see what happens. now in the off season, while I've few disposable kgs of fat to burn I don't think it's gonna be a big issue, but I wonder what about summer climbing days - when I'll get all skinny, and will need regular fuel intakes, that will give me instant kick... but for now I'm putting all that sticky-licky stuff aside. already boiled some eggs for my early morning ride :mrgreen:
depends how far you ride .... if you ride long distances, you burn loads of calories and if you don't eat proper food (hamburgers, magnum ice creams, coca cola, pork pies etc), you will bonk on day 2

watch this video of the Indian Pacific Road Race and you will see what the guys eat (its a good documentary):

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

thanks, looks like I've some material to go through!
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Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

tymon_tm wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 8:47 am
the result was almost always a hurried up restroom break.. making longer, 'sitting' breaks sucks,
So this is about having to go "Dumoulin". :P That's a tough one. You need to find a way to empty out before you ride. I do a big breakfast and coffee and if I don't produce a large basket of brown babies arms in short order, I am dissappointed.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

that's basically my way too - fill up, empty out, go. 90-100 km ride - no problems whatsoever. issues arise when I have to refuel after ~3-4 hrs. apparently the amount of food I'm able to eat before a ride doesn't last for longer (and I can't eat more - doh!) and while I try to keep them calories coming (if I plan to extend my ride) after that point some hardware malfuction occurs.

I'm definitely going to play with breakfast routine, perhaps eat less and take some more stuff to eat during a ride? I've already gone through a low GI product list, most of this stuff I alread eat, but then for instance I mix dark bread with jam or honey (looks like a no-no), I eat cereal, but not THAT kind of cereal apparently, and I sure as hell need to add some grains to my regular diet, as well as herbs.

on a side note, have you guys tried those ginger-curcuma drinks? I'm wondering if my euro stomach will cope with such a mixture...
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Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

Your problem on the ride isn't the food you've eaten at breakfast. It's the food from the day before. I don't believe food transit time is that fast in humans unless of course one is ill. Sorry, I have no real advice for you. Perhaps crotchless bibshorts and a seat with a bigger cutout? At least you won't have to stop. :P
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

basilic
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by basilic

I'd guess there are no universal solutions, you have to figure it for yourself.

On a long day I'm unable to have a proper meal in the middle, but I know people who can, and will. I just feel lousy on the bike afterward, no energy, for a good hour.
My solution is savory foods that I bring along, whole grain/bresaola sandwich, cashew nuts, etc. I'll stop a few minutes and eat, not too much, then ride on. I end the ride in some calorie deficit , but that's not a problem.

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Mr.Gib wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 6:03 pm
Your problem on the ride isn't the food you've eaten at breakfast. It's the food from the day before. I don't believe food transit time is that fast in humans unless of course one is ill. Sorry, I have no real advice for you. Perhaps crotchless bibshorts and a seat with a bigger cutout? At least you won't have to stop. :P

The meal the day before is important, but you absolutely need to refuel early and often on long rides. Medium glycemic index carbs early on and high index carbs in the last hour. Processed and diversified sugars get absorbed extremely fast...it’s why gels and energy bars never have just one type of sugar, your metabolism “multitasks” and converts them into glycogen in parallel.

by Weenie


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