£2000 to spend on a trainer..what would you get?

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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RTW
in the industry
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Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 2:32 pm

by RTW

bm0p700f wrote:
Thu Feb 14, 2019 10:23 pm
I think I'd rather buy a holiday than £2000 on a trainer. I would not even spend 2000 bolivars in one. It's nice outside now you know. In fact we seems to have a different countries weather.
That wasn't what was asked though. The OP might have 7 weeks of cycling holidays booked. In fact, the indoor setup might be for their chalet in the Alps, to use after dark, while skiing all day.

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4380
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

Drivo or Neo. For the cost of a Neo Bike, you can buy a Shimano 105 R7000 bike to leave on the trainer permanently and also have around as a spare.

by Weenie


mattr
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

RTW wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:36 pm
The Wattbike can be used by different users really simply.
Adjust (or change) bars and saddle. Possibly change pedals and/or cranks. Yeah, simple. Popping a bike on takes <60 seconds. And the set up is already right.
RTW wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:36 pm
The computer ‘finds’ the Wattbike immediately, not always the way with the Kickr, as there are multiple sensors (Kickr, then search the cadence sensor). That’s a huge disadvantage when you want to do a 30 min workout and 10 mins are wasted trying to find the trainer.
Get a neo then. Or a better computer/set up. Mine finds everything (Neo, HRM, Cadence) in about 10-15 seconds. About as long as it takes to get on the bike and get clipped in and comfortable.

Can't believe how much some people struggle with basic tasks. Like using QRs, or towels.

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4380
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

The separate cadence sensor gripe is silly. Pretty much every direct-drive smart trainer EXCEPT the KICKR line has integrated cadence sensing. In the case of the Neo, a capacitive sensor detects your feet/crank passing over it. In the case of every other trainer, changes in torque (deadspots) are used to deduce when one full revolution has occurred.

mattr
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 9:42 am
In the case of the Neo, a capacitive sensor detects your feet/crank passing over it.
Is that a change for Neo 2? Original Neo uses torque flunctuations. (According to Tacx anyway.)

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4380
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

mattr wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 10:31 am
TobinHatesYou wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 9:42 am
In the case of the Neo, a capacitive sensor detects your feet/crank passing over it.
Is that a change for Neo 2? Original Neo uses torque flunctuations. (According to Tacx anyway.)

Yep, new with the Neo 2. That also means it can do rudimentary L/R balance about as well as the spider-based PMs.

mattr
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

OK, makes sense, that's why i have to use a third party cadence sensor, the built in one doesn't like my pedalling style unless i'm slogging away sub 90 rpm. Soon as i get over about 110 it starts dropping data.

RTW
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Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 2:32 pm

by RTW

...

myano001
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:19 am

by myano001

I use a Kickr 16 that had some of the issues with being detected but after doing the firmware updates it is found each and every time without issue. I just use my power sensor for cadence but even before then I had a cadence and speed sensor for my rides so it never bothered me. If I were doing it again I may buy a Neo primarily for the rocking ability that allows some flex. To do that now, I am going to build a rocker plate setup.

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