Anyone lost a lot of weight, and kept it off?

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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TheRich
Posts: 635
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2019 1:36 am

by TheRich

Shrike wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 4:52 pm
Oh and the other things is that base phases, like TrainerRoad's which are mostly sweetspot, especially the high volume plans, are most fuelled by riders on higher carb ratios. Maybe it's a case that we need to learn to do base phases like these but work on fat adaptation too. Maybe we're only doing one half of the equation.
Remember that TrainerRoad is mostly trainer focused, because of that it's going to be shorter duration workouts...so they dial up the intensity in order to have some sort of training load and effect.

rides4beer
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Location: SC

by rides4beer

I was probably somewhere around 127kgs at my biggest (123kg was the highest documented, but I was bigger than that, just never stepped on a scale lol), down to 82-84kg and have kept it off for seven years (270-280lbs down to 180-185lbs for those that don't want to do the conversion). I did get lower, but that was when I was hyper focused on what I was eating, with a more relaxed and realistic diet, I stay where I'm at pretty easily now. Dropped the weight in about 10 months, first four months were just diet changes and calorie counting, then brought in exercise (running primarily, only starting cycling about a year ago).

As far as what to eat, what works, etc. I tell everyone the same thing, if you can't do it for the rest of your life, it won't work long term. So forget the fad diets, eat less and move more (then as your activity levels come up, you can eat more and maintain the same weight, but initially calorie restriction is the name of the game). I was super focused on what I ate at first, until things like smaller portion sizes became a habit. I don't even think about what I eat anymore, I eat pizza, burgers, drink beer, etc., I just eat less of it, but I also workout 12-14 hours a week (that's dedicated workouts, rides, running, etc., not counting walks, taking the stairs, and all of the other ways that I make sure I keep moving throughout the day).

There are some interesting studies on the high energy flux idea, basically eat more, move more. But you have to move A LOT to make it work. Your body finds a stasis, but the activity level has to be much higher than where most people are at.

by Weenie


Shrike
Posts: 1835
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2016 5:08 pm

by Shrike

rides4beer wrote:
Fri Oct 11, 2019 8:50 pm
I was probably somewhere around 127kgs at my biggest (123kg was the highest documented, but I was bigger than that, just never stepped on a scale lol), down to 82-84kg and have kept it off for seven years (270-280lbs down to 180-185lbs for those that don't want to do the conversion). I did get lower, but that was when I was hyper focused on what I was eating, with a more relaxed and realistic diet, I stay where I'm at pretty easily now. Dropped the weight in about 10 months, first four months were just diet changes and calorie counting, then brought in exercise (running primarily, only starting cycling about a year ago).

As far as what to eat, what works, etc. I tell everyone the same thing, if you can't do it for the rest of your life, it won't work long term. So forget the fad diets, eat less and move more (then as your activity levels come up, you can eat more and maintain the same weight, but initially calorie restriction is the name of the game). I was super focused on what I ate at first, until things like smaller portion sizes became a habit. I don't even think about what I eat anymore, I eat pizza, burgers, drink beer, etc., I just eat less of it, but I also workout 12-14 hours a week (that's dedicated workouts, rides, running, etc., not counting walks, taking the stairs, and all of the other ways that I make sure I keep moving throughout the day).

There are some interesting studies on the high energy flux idea, basically eat more, move more. But you have to move A LOT to make it work. Your body finds a stasis, but the activity level has to be much higher than where most people are at.

Amazing reduction in a short period of time, congrats!

Would that amount of weight loss not destroy your leptin levels, and make you significantly more hungry? Did you notice that at some point, that your hunger levels just really increased and the smaller portions just couldn't satisfy you?

rides4beer
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2018 5:27 am
Location: SC

by rides4beer

Shrike wrote:
Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:58 pm
Amazing reduction in a short period of time, congrats!

Would that amount of weight loss not destroy your leptin levels, and make you significantly more hungry? Did you notice that at some point, that your hunger levels just really increased and the smaller portions just couldn't satisfy you?
Thanks!

There was def some hunger management in the beginning, nothing unbearable, just "Oh, I'm hungry, this is part of losing weight, deal with it" lol But it leveled off. I do notice that I will get hungry now if I haven't eaten in a while, but my body has gotten used to eating throughout the day, it's pretty rare for me to go more than 2-3 hours without eating something (snacks, not full meals obviously). But with my activity level, my metabolism is pretty high, gotta keep fueling the fire.

I don't think there's any way to reduce calories without having hunger, that's just the reality of it, and calorie reduction is the only way to lose weight (every single plan out there is just a way to make calorie reduction manageable). But it does level off, at least it did for me. Then as my activity levels increased even more (ultra running and now cycling), my caloric needs increased as well. I don't track calories anymore, but I def eat a lot to maintain my energy levels and training now.

I will note that it is a very fine line to walk when trying to train and lose weight at the same time. I've found that if your main goal is to lose weight, then you need to be willing to allow your training to suffer a bit, because your energy levels will be down. During marathon training for my PR, I was able to drop a few pounds while keeping my training volume and energy up, but it took a lot of focus on everything I was eating and drinking.

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

Congrats rides4beer, Impressive what you have achieved. I admire the determination because I doubt I could do it.

My experience was very different. Although I raced as a junior at 185 pounds 30 years ago, I was my heaviest at 200 lbs 15 years ago. I was never overweight, just wide shoulders, long torso, long arms, thick neck, and above average muscle, particularely legs, ass ect. Over the last 15 years I have literally shrunk down to 170 lbs, with the occassional foray down to 165 for mountain adventures. My arms are sticks, my legs are much smaller. My method was nothing other then to ride a lot. I never considered diet (which was always high quality, if a bit excessive). The loss of muscle mass is interesting. Probably a natural part of aging. I guess I didn't replace it with fat which is more typical. Holy crap what a difference. I can finally climb. Haven't won a sprint against anybody in years though.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

stoney
Posts: 259
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 11:26 am

by stoney

I have finally made it to my target weight through intermittent fasting. I was able to lose 15 pounds in 2 months time. I roughly followed the 18/6 plan where my first meal was at 12 noon and my last meal was 6pm. If I had a long morning group ride planned then I ditched the intermittent fasting for the day to fuel for the workout. The last thing I want to do is be "that guy" that bonks on a group ride holding everyone up. I also made sure that I ate plenty of protein everyday and plenty of carbs on days when I had some intensity planned. I'm 51 years old and feel better than I've felt in years thanks to intermittent fasting approximately 5 to 6 days per week.

gurk700
Posts: 375
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2017 7:40 pm

by gurk700

I've lost almost 60lbs with cycling and kept it off for close to 4 years now.
5'7"
From 208lbs to 150lbs.
First year of that I ate whatever I wanted.
Second year of that I went vegan. My training and performance stayed the same and so did my weight.
Still ate whatever I wanted however much I felt like.

I still have a lot of fat in my mid section so decided to take my diet to another level.
Eating A LOT cleaner now. ZERO junk food. I quit coffee too to make sure I absorb all the iron I need.
I eat so much in a day that I'm always full so thinking about junk food makes me wanna vomit. When I crave food, I started craving nutritional food. This change literally happened over a week.
First week I was hungry. A LOT. Whenever I get hungry I'd eat an apple and it would satisfy me.
My diet is mostly below foods and probably bunch of other healthy stuff I'm forgetting.

Rice, beans, sweet potatoes, spinach, nutritional yeast, bananas, oats, apples, all kinds of berries, tofu, tempeh, avocado etc.

Daily it's like 80% carbs, 10% fats (almost always from avocado so healthy fats), 10% protein

I laugh when I see non carb diets. Maybe it's personal. Weight is coming off so fast that I'm actually worried. 1.5 weeks into this. Already down to 147.3 lbs this morning. I've never seen it that low in my adult life. I'm 36.
I'm performing just as good. Have a lot of energy. I'm back on sufferfest and my results are comparable or better than last winter.

Training is important but food is a HUUUUUGE chunk of this equation.

Just my 2 cents.

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