Anyone lost a lot of weight, and kept it off?

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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WinterRider
Posts: 571
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by WinterRider

CrankAddictsRich wrote:
Thu Jun 06, 2019 11:51 am
^^^ that's pretty awesome. Good job.
YES..huge WIN. Congrats!
Litespeed 2000 Appalachian 61 cm
Litespeed 1998 Blue Ridge 61cm

Fitness rider.. 1 yr from seven decades age.

That is my story and I'm stick'n to it.

kafreeman
Posts: 138
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2015 8:46 pm

by kafreeman

Thanks, the wife had our wedding pics up the other day and it's a rather stark contrast.

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by Weenie


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853guy
Posts: 226
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by 853guy

853guy wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 12:08 pm
Last weekend we moved into an apartment for the summer. It has digital bathroom scales, which we’ve not owned ourselves for probably seven years.

For kicks and giggles I thought I’d weight myself, which I had also not done for probably seven years.

Yesterday morning I weighed in at 63.0 kg. When I went to bed it was up to 63.5 kg. This morning, I weighed in at 62.7 kg.

Over a 24-hour period then, I gained 500 grams from my first weigh in and lost 300 grams, for a gross difference of 800 grams.

Which is why I personally don’t weigh myself. Day-to-day weight variation is a natural part of the way our bodies hold or release weight depending on numerous variables, all in constant fluctuation. Measured weight per se tells me nothing about my lean muscle mass to body fat composition, nor water storage or anything else. It’s simply a metric that needs to be evaluated dynamically over time rather than statically in time, in which body (re)composition should be the defining context.

I offer this as a single, individualized data point for whatever that may be worth.

Best,

853guy
So I thought I would give a personal update on my own progress of losing weight and keeping it off.

Though I tend not to weigh myself as a form of micro-management, a scale is obviously one metric that helps track and evaluate progress over the long term.

Here’s me as of two days ago - 63.25kg @ 171cm, @ 45.5 years of age. Compared to my last post, this represents hardly any change in weight per se. However, since then, I’ve lost body fat (both subcutaneous and visceral) while gaining skeletal muscle, the holy grail I’ve been attempting since beginning my odyssey. I make this distinction because in my early efforts I was losing as much muscle as I was fat (and a lot of water weight), which was not what I wanted (whilst feeling horrible).

Do I still have body fat? Of course. Is the gradual overall trend one of losing fat and replacing it with muscle in a long-term sustainable manner? Yes (since March, body fat is down from 23.9% to 20.9%, and skeletal muscle up from 49.2% to 51.1%). So far, so good.

I’ve also made some modifications (tinkering) since the beginning of the year. I’ve ditched the Bulletproof-style coffees (just straight black espresso), upped my protein intake, and begun deadlifting at half body weight for form and posture. I continue to use kettle bells most mornings, and cycle purely for fun, at medium-low intensities, with one or two quick sprints/out-of-the-saddle efforts, no more than 45 minutes, once or twice a week (and sometimes less depending on work/family commitments).

Weight-based exercise (kettle bells, deadlift, squats, overhead press, chin ups) occurs for no more than 20 minutes a day, six days a week at home (no gym work or exercise machines). With the occasional bit of cycling thrown in, my total number of hours spent exercising is less than four hours per week on average, and never exceeds six hours.

The intermittent fasting between a 4-6 hour window, consuming a whole-foods high protein, fat and fibre diet with medium to low veggies and fruit (no processed carbs), and one treat meal a week continues as before.

This for me is my Minimum Effective Dose allowing me to continue to replace fat with muscle, eat well, and get leaner, stronger, more mobile, and have superior joint health and critical markers for longevity. It also means I’m less likely to fall prey to injury through overtraining, and have more time for family.

However, like all things internet, a pic is just a pic - a data point among many (and endlessly debatable how representative of reality it is). For me though, it’s a little reminder that progress continues to be made, and that one should never underestimate the effect of moderate effort applied consistently.

My best to all those still on the journey.

853guy

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thedanplasse
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2018 11:04 pm
Location: Massachusetts

by thedanplasse

Cycling, and dieting last season (rollers over the winter), and continuing my diet, and cycling this season I'm down from 210lbs to 163lbs.
2018 Specialized Tarmac Expert Sl5

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853guy
Posts: 226
Joined: Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 pm

by 853guy

853guy wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:34 am
So I thought I would give a personal update on my own progress of losing weight and keeping it off.

Though I tend not to weigh myself as a form of micro-management, a scale is obviously one metric that helps track and evaluate progress over the long term.

Here’s me as of two days ago - 63.25kg @ 171cm, @ 45.5 years of age. Compared to my last post, this represents hardly any change in weight per se. However, since then, I’ve lost body fat (both subcutaneous and visceral) while gaining skeletal muscle, the holy grail I’ve been attempting since beginning my odyssey. I make this distinction because in my early efforts I was losing as much muscle as I was fat (and a lot of water weight), which was not what I wanted (whilst feeling horrible).

Do I still have body fat? Of course. Is the gradual overall trend one of losing fat and replacing it with muscle in a long-term sustainable manner? Yes (since March, body fat is down from 23.9% to 20.9%, and skeletal muscle up from 49.2% to 51.1%). So far, so good.

I’ve also made some modifications (tinkering) since the beginning of the year. I’ve ditched the Bulletproof-style coffees (just straight black espresso), upped my protein intake, and begun deadlifting at half body weight for form and posture. I continue to use kettle bells most mornings, and cycle purely for fun, at medium-low intensities, with one or two quick sprints/out-of-the-saddle efforts, no more than 45 minutes, once or twice a week (and sometimes less depending on work/family commitments).

Weight-based exercise (kettle bells, deadlift, squats, overhead press, chin ups) occurs for no more than 20 minutes a day, six days a week at home (no gym work or exercise machines). With the occasional bit of cycling thrown in, my total number of hours spent exercising is less than four hours per week on average, and never exceeds six hours.

The intermittent fasting between a 4-6 hour window, consuming a whole-foods high protein, fat and fibre diet with medium to low veggies and fruit (no processed carbs), and one treat meal a week continues as before.

This for me is my Minimum Effective Dose allowing me to continue to replace fat with muscle, eat well, and get leaner, stronger, more mobile, and have superior joint health and critical markers for longevity. It also means I’m less likely to fall prey to injury through overtraining, and have more time for family.

However, like all things internet, a pic is just a pic - a data point among many (and endlessly debatable how representative of reality it is). For me though, it’s a little reminder that progress continues to be made, and that one should never underestimate the effect of moderate effort applied consistently.

My best to all those still on the journey.

853guy
Update:

Now down from 63.25kg to 60.8kg. Body fat down from 20.9% to 19.2%. Skeletal muscle up from 51.1% to 52.0%.

No pics this time.

853guy


Shrike
Posts: 1817
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2016 5:08 pm

by Shrike

Nice one on keeping the weight down!

I loved this article because it jives perfectly with my own personal experience with hunger:
https://medium.com/@drjasonfung/control ... ca7562b8fe

But the last couple lines confused me. It says in conclusion that fasting helps weight loss in a way that calorie restriction doesn't. Wouldn't a more accurate way of making his point be that, fasting achieves the calorie restriction necessary to lose fat and reduce hunger, whereas simply restricting calories but eating more regularly will eventually fail as it doesn't stop hunger?

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853guy
Posts: 226
Joined: Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 pm

by 853guy

Shrike wrote:
Sun Sep 15, 2019 4:01 pm
I loved this article because it jives perfectly with my own personal experience with hunger:
https://medium.com/@drjasonfung/control ... ca7562b8fe

But the last couple lines confused me. It says in conclusion that fasting helps weight loss in a way that calorie restriction doesn't. Wouldn't a more accurate way of making his point be that, fasting achieves the calorie restriction necessary to lose fat and reduce hunger, whereas simply restricting calories but eating more regularly will eventually fail as it doesn't stop hunger?
Hi Shrike,

My understanding is that intermittent fasting promotes hormonal adaptations resulting in increased insulin resistance, increased production of human growth hormone, increased metabolic rate, surpression of ghrelin and promotion of cellular autophagy, whereas simple caloric restriction does not. In fact, caloric restriction often has the opposite effect.

Fung contrasts and compares the two approaches here:

https://superfastdiet.com/calorie-restr ... t-fasting/

Best,

853guy

AJS914
Posts: 4117
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

Shrike wrote:
Sun Sep 15, 2019 4:01 pm
Wouldn't a more accurate way of making his point be that, fasting achieves the calorie restriction necessary to lose fat and reduce hunger, whereas simply restricting calories but eating more regularly will eventually fail as it doesn't stop hunger?
I think he basically says that in the last sentence.

I've read Fung's stuff and his book. I'm a fan.

My understanding is that intermittent fasting is basically a hack. When they put rats and mice on restricted feeding window they end up eating less over all. If you stick to a restricted eating window you can only eat so much at a meal. An extreme example would be trying to eat a 2400 calorie allotment in a 4 hour window. It just becomes physically impossible.

But there are other benefits of fasting like autophagy - cellular cleanup.

I've done up to a 24 hour fast and it's a lot easier than one might think. You go through a few periods of hunger and then it passes.

I think most people would benefit from a minimum 12 hour fast and zero snacking between meals. And that after dinner snack in front of the TV is probably the worst.

kafreeman
Posts: 138
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2015 8:46 pm

by kafreeman

Down 22.5 kg this year.

Fasting mostly to credit this.

Hard to keep things in check with work since having to return to the office. Way to hot in the garage to get on the trainer at 6 am. Riding is down to 3 days a week, 1.5 hrs on weekdays and 2.5 to 3 hrs on the weekend.

I used to get 4 days during the week when I was purely working from home, then a few hours on the weekend.

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TheRich
Posts: 635
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2019 1:36 am

by TheRich

Shrike wrote:
Sun Sep 15, 2019 4:01 pm
Nice one on keeping the weight down!

I loved this article because it jives perfectly with my own personal experience with hunger:
https://medium.com/@drjasonfung/control ... ca7562b8fe

But the last couple lines confused me. It says in conclusion that fasting helps weight loss in a way that calorie restriction doesn't. Wouldn't a more accurate way of making his point be that, fasting achieves the calorie restriction necessary to lose fat and reduce hunger, whereas simply restricting calories but eating more regularly will eventually fail as it doesn't stop hunger?
Fasting, in effect, IS calorie restriction. Part of the problem with reducing intake is that it's really easy to not reduce intake, where "fasting" eliminates the possibility of making that mistake because you're not sitting down to eat anything.

Not sure I'd call 6 hours without eating "fasting" though, but whatever works for you.

kafreeman
Posts: 138
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2015 8:46 pm

by kafreeman

6 hours no... 16 barely. Enough to alter my behavior from when I was 140 kg.

Wife and I will do 24 hrs when we anticipate low activity in a day. If its a training day then 16.

I try to stop eating by 7 at night. I normally wind up having dinner eaten around 7 by the time we get the kids and get home from work.

Then up at 6 for a training day for me straight onto the bike, get in 60 to 90 min then shower make the kids lunch make my lunch then off to work.

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Shrike
Posts: 1817
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2016 5:08 pm

by Shrike

kafreeman wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:43 am
6 hours no... 16 barely. Enough to alter my behavior from when I was 140 kg.

Wife and I will do 24 hrs when we anticipate low activity in a day. If its a training day then 16.

I try to stop eating by 7 at night. I normally wind up having dinner eaten around 7 by the time we get the kids and get home from work.

Then up at 6 for a training day for me straight onto the bike, get in 60 to 90 min then shower make the kids lunch make my lunch then off to work.

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Would you be heavily glycogen depleted after a day of fasting, making the early morning workout difficult? Or is the early morning ride low intensity, like an endurance ride?

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853guy
Posts: 226
Joined: Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 pm

by 853guy

Shrike wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 8:26 am
kafreeman wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:43 am
6 hours no... 16 barely. Enough to alter my behavior from when I was 140 kg.

Wife and I will do 24 hrs when we anticipate low activity in a day. If its a training day then 16.

I try to stop eating by 7 at night. I normally wind up having dinner eaten around 7 by the time we get the kids and get home from work.

Then up at 6 for a training day for me straight onto the bike, get in 60 to 90 min then shower make the kids lunch make my lunch then off to work.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
Would you be heavily glycogen depleted after a day of fasting, making the early morning workout difficult? Or is the early morning ride low intensity, like an endurance ride?
Hi Shrike,

It's difficult to generalise since the individual’s skeletal muscle, muscle mass, gender, eating and exercise (intensity, time) habits determine how quickly stores are depleted.

Have a look at this:

The use of fasting and glycogen depletion to enhance skeletal muscle adaptation to training

A brief summary is that there’s pros and cons. Low glycogen (fasted) training promotes increases in mitochondrial enzyme activity and skeletal muscle remodelling in favour of free fatty acid utilisation. However, reduced glycogen content also impairs peak power output during intense efforts.

FWIW, I only eat between a four hour window (high protein, medium animal fats/olive oil, low fruit veges), and find a 90 minute low-intensity fasted ride or weight session to be perfectly managable. Again, I have no performance goals re: cycling, only recreational ones, so can't say how this affects competitive athletes.

Best,

853guy

by Weenie


redbicycle
Posts: 37
Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:21 pm

by redbicycle

Shrike wrote:Anyone cracked the code? :P
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Here is mine. 2 1/2 years. My code is:

track all calories on a app with a weight loss goal. Eat whatever you want but your forced to eat less calorie dense foods for more food mass.

I also discovered anyone is welcome at triathlons and I started participating in them and training for them.

I also went vegan to get off cholesterol meds.


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