Training plans/books for non-time crunched cyclists?

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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sib
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2015 2:03 am

by sib

Starting this winter, I'm going to be able to work from home. This means that I'll be able to dedicate some of the time I currently spend commuting to cycling.

I'm thinking I'll probably have a couple of hours per day (a little more on some days will probably also be possible) on weekday mornings, and eight hours or so at the weekend, for a total of 16 hours or so.
It's not a massive amount of time, but it's a lot more than I used to have and I want to use it wisely.

So, my question: there are lots of plans and books dedicated to people who have little time to train - are there any for those with more free time?

by Weenie


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53x12
Posts: 3762
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 6:02 am
Location: On the bike

by 53x12

"Marginal gains are the only gains when all that's left to gain is in the margins."

AJS914
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Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

nevermind! read the title wrong

Rubik
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2017 1:59 pm

by Rubik

Joe Friel's training bible.

Pick your hours (on a yearly basis). Everything from 10 to 30+ a week.

Go from there.
Cat 1

GambadiLegno
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2016 10:26 am
Location: Spain

by GambadiLegno

If you can train 16 hours per week, you can get your best performance for sure. That amount is enough. In fact, with 10-12 hours you can get as well great results. Normally, more than 15-16 hours for a non-pro rider is more a disadvantage than an advantage.

In Joe Friel's book you have everything you need, including how to organize your plan and every week depending on the time you have for the bike. It's the most complete book about training and at the back you also have examples of different training workouts depending on the training period you are.

Then, it could be a good idea to mix it with Coggan's book if you have a powermeter, although I prefer the training methods of Carmichael. In Coggan's, the type of workouts are a bit monotonous and they repeat a lot, also you don't have many examples. It's more a book based on understanding how a powermeter works, and how to analyze the data you get, but then you need tips for planning the season, periods and weeks.

angrylegs
Posts: 116
Joined: Mon May 21, 2012 2:32 pm

by angrylegs

+1 for using Friel's and Coggan's books.

roycook
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:16 am

by roycook

Haha.. I think so too
I really like cycling that's why I want to participate tour of britain next year

snowdevlin
Posts: 176
Joined: Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:51 pm

by snowdevlin

I just got my new PM and am looking to train a bit harder/ better.
When looking for some information I found the two books mentioned above, Coggan´s Training and Racing with a PM, and Friel's Cyclist bible.
Which one would be suit a cyclist looking to train harder/ smarter, take advantage of the PM and give some workout plans?
cheers

olebole
Posts: 134
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:42 pm

by olebole

Let Xert do the work and read some Ishiguro instead of Coggan/Friel





snowdevlin
Posts: 176
Joined: Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:51 pm

by snowdevlin

olebole wrote:
Sun Jan 28, 2018 5:12 pm
Let Xert do the work and read some Ishiguro instead of Coggan/Friel
???

by Weenie


AJS914
Posts: 2039
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

Read all the books and try the free trial of Xert once you know your way around training with power and the terminology.

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