Killing the Cravings

A light bike doesn't replace good fitness.

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Jenmoss
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:15 am

by Jenmoss

It’s funny isn’t it that we suffer from food cravings , we need that delicious chocolate bar or tasty cake. If they did not exist you would not be craving these pleasurable delights. But We know they are there so we give in to temptation or find a substitute. You don’t really need to snack ,it’s usually down to boredom in most cases.
I don’t snack I just eat . If I want a chocolate bar or a cake I eat it enjoy it and then look in the mirror and cry myself to sleep and promise I will start a new diet tomorrow or Monday :lol:

Ahhhh. The pressure of modern day life. It’s so tough :lol:

by Weenie


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Lelandjt
Posts: 414
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2016 7:10 am

by Lelandjt

As Rick James said, "Cocain's a hell of a drug!"
Pantani style!
Though that could get more expensive than EPO and steroids.

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853guy
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 pm

by 853guy

Best way I found to kill cravings was three fold:

1) Cut all refined carbs, sugars and anything white*. As others have alluded to, once you create a carb cliff and end up at the bottom, your body will only want to climb back up it again, creating cravings.

2) Up the amount of protein, fat and fibre in meals (favourite post-ride meal: five whole scrambled eggs with LSA [ground linseed, sunflower and almond), pumpkin seeds, garlic, shallots, himalayan pink salt, and lemon juice).

3) Don't snack. Instead, eat more at mealtimes (with respect to 1) and 2)), and up the intake of liquids with Bulletproof-style coffee (before 2pm), organic herbal teas and/or water. You're probably not hungry - you're probably thirsty.

Been working for me, and I was a long-time carb addict. Good luck.

853guy

*I allow myself one meal - read: meal, not day - in which we'll go out for dinner to some sort of French, Italian, American or Asian restaurant, or stay in and have home-made burgers, fries and Häagen-Dazs. This is preceded by a hard, short ride the day of, and followed by a longer, slower ride the day after.

N.B: Just to be a little vulnerable here, I found my propensity to snack - especially on sugary foods - was linked to my emotional state. I would generally feel like snacking because I was experiencing an emotion I was uncomfortable with. This was made most stark when I worked for a particular company, and my anxiety and insecurity was at an all time high. Rather than admit to myself I was feeling anxious or insecure, I simply went to the well stocked fridge and cupboards at the office and gorged on sugar - negating the emotion with food (i.e. sugar) which caused its own neuro-physiological problems, requiring more snacking (see how that works?). Since then, I've worked on owning my feelings more (and cutting the foods listed in 1) above), and hence, thankfully, snacking has become a thing of the past. For whatever that might be worth.

Jenmoss
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:15 am

by Jenmoss

853guy wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:58 pm
Best way I found to kill cravings was three fold:

1) Cut all refined carbs, sugars and anything white*. As others have alluded to, once you create a carb cliff and end up at the bottom, your body will only want to climb back up it again, creating cravings.

2) Up the amount of protein, fat and fibre in meals (favourite post-ride meal: five whole scrambled eggs with LSA [ground linseed, sunflower and almond), pumpkin seeds, garlic, shallots, himalayan pink salt, and lemon juice).

3) Don't snack. Instead, eat more at mealtimes (with respect to 1) and 2)), and up the intake of liquids with Bulletproof-style coffee (before 2pm), organic herbal teas and/or water. You're probably not hungry - you're probably thirsty.

Been working for me, and I was a long-time carb addict. Good luck.

853guy

*I allow myself one meal - read: meal, not day - in which we'll go out for dinner to some sort of French, Italian, American or Asian restaurant, or stay in and have home-made burgers, fries and Häagen-Dazs. This is preceded by a hard, short ride the day of, and followed by a longer, slower ride the day after.

N.B: Just to be a little vulnerable here, I found my propensity to snack - especially on sugary foods - was linked to my emotional state. I would generally feel like snacking because I was experiencing an emotion I was uncomfortable with. This was made most stark when I worked for a particular company, and my anxiety and insecurity was at an all time high. Rather than admit to myself I was feeling anxious or insecure, I simply went to the well stocked fridge and cupboards at the office and gorged on sugar - negating the emotion with food (i.e. sugar) which caused its own neuro-physiological problems, requiring more snacking (see how that works?). Since then, I've worked on owning my feelings more (and cutting the foods listed in 1) above), and hence, thankfully, snacking has become a thing of the past. For whatever that might be worth.

Good point . I was listening to a radio call in show some time ago and quite a few people put weight on after losing a close family member . It’s a strange way to handle grief but each their own .
The has been a huge pyshcological impact made by advertising companies in selling their sugary delights and junk food and also quite a bit of misleading information concerning food. No fat / low fat does not equal no sugar . You don’t see many fat French people . They seem to have a good life balance. In UK And US It’s work work work stress stress stress . A lot of people don’t have the time to look after themselves , they are just struggling to survive. People in debt is good for banks and if they by junk food etc to comfort themselves that’s all the better for the company’s making and selling junk food . Look how many us sitcoms show people eating ice cream after a break up etc ( Big Bang theory the last episode of will and grace I watched etc ) . It’s a trigger. Go big “it’s cheap” get fat ,get addicted. Food is an addiction for a lot of people .

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Lewn777
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:35 am

by Lewn777

I think different methods work well for different people.

For me I like to control my weight with periodic 4-5 day fast mimicking and eating a mostly wholefoods plant based diet in a 12 hour window the rest of the time. I find that doing 4-5 days of 500-700 calories I can cut about 3-4kg if I get too heavy. Personally I don't like to overthink things normally day to day as I then run into problems when I ride being under-carbed or under-fuelled if I try to restrict calories or carbohydrates especially as I like enduro rides.

Fasting is particularly useful in the winter or very early spring when the weather can be pretty nasty to be riding anyway and it's a great way to quickly get down to nice weight to ride in the summer season, calorie or carb restriction just takes too long sometimes. Face it, it's stupid to be riding a classic summer climb being 90kg, when you could or should weigh 70kg.

If you want to try fasting do some proper research from multiple sources. Yes even youtube can be useful, but keep away from the Bro-science idiots and listen to the advice of expert professors and qualified dietitians.

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853guy
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 pm

by 853guy

Jenmoss wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 4:38 pm
853guy wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:58 pm
Just to be a little vulnerable here, I found my propensity to snack - especially on sugary foods - was linked to my emotional state. I would generally feel like snacking because I was experiencing an emotion I was uncomfortable with. This was made most stark when I worked for a particular company, and my anxiety and insecurity was at an all time high. Rather than admit to myself I was feeling anxious or insecure, I simply went to the well stocked fridge and cupboards at the office and gorged on sugar - negating the emotion with food (i.e. sugar) which caused its own neuro-physiological problems, requiring more snacking (see how that works?). Since then, I've worked on owning my feelings more (and cutting the foods listed in 1) above), and hence, thankfully, snacking has become a thing of the past. For whatever that might be worth.

Good point . I was listening to a radio call in show some time ago and quite a few people put weight on after losing a close family member . It’s a strange way to handle grief but each their own .
The has been a huge pyshcological impact made by advertising companies in selling their sugary delights and junk food and also quite a bit of misleading information concerning food. No fat / low fat does not equal no sugar . You don’t see many fat French people . They seem to have a good life balance. In UK And US It’s work work work stress stress stress . A lot of people don’t have the time to look after themselves , they are just struggling to survive. People in debt is good for banks and if they by junk food etc to comfort themselves that’s all the better for the company’s making and selling junk food . Look how many us sitcoms show people eating ice cream after a break up etc ( Big Bang theory the last episode of will and grace I watched etc ) . It’s a trigger. Go big “it’s cheap” get fat ,get addicted. Food is an addiction for a lot of people .
As someone who worked in drug and alcohol for several years with youth and found adult offenders, I'd say the negation of difficult, uncomfortable or overwhelming emotion via external means is the single overriding characteristic of any addiction, be it drugs, alcohol, self-harm, food (or lack thereof), social media, pornography, sex, physical or psychological or sexual abuse of another, material consumption and yes, even exercise.

Just because something may have a socially-acceptable facade doesn't mean it's not motivated by the need to obscure something the individual would rather not acknowledge or change.

Best,

853guy

ghisallo2003
Posts: 595
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2006 7:10 pm

by ghisallo2003

Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.
Kate Moss

jfranci3
Posts: 234
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:21 pm

by jfranci3

I've always found that when I didn't eat ENOUGH that I would get cravings. When I put the effort into mapping my current calorie intake, I would eat 1800, 1800, 4000 calorie patterns. I then ate more per day and more times per day. I was MUCH better at eating healthy. When I'm burning a lot of calories, I now try to eat 5-6x/day in smaller amounts. A healthy 10am snack leads to a healthier lunch, as the 3pm snack leads to a better dinner.

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