TRP Spyre stock pads VS. ????

Especially for light weight issues concerning cyclocross / touring bikes & parts.

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Catagory6
Posts: 399
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:36 am

by Catagory6

all of this brake pad material is confusing, just tell me what to get so i can stop better
gonna be doing some STEEEP and muddy (even snowy) descents up in vermont in these next couple months
is there a definitive guide that describes the different compounds?
i could get a couple different styles for wet and dry conditions.
just need STOPPING POWER !!! but i don't want to be "that guy" with the "angry elephant" brake syndrome.
this particular bike doesn't get all THAT much use. just for dirt events/races

swisstop disc 15e ?

if it matters, front rotor is 140mm Ice Tech RT99 Freeza
rear is 160 sram centerline x (2-piece)

is resin the same as organic?
is semi-metallic the same as sintered?

by Weenie


bm0p700f
in the industry
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by bm0p700f

I use ebc pads. These work very well. They do organic and sintered compounds. Both stop you quicker and last longer than the trp pads.

Mr.Gib
Posts: 3605
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
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by Mr.Gib

Semi metallic from TRP has given me the best grip on the rotor and best initial bite which I like for road use. I think your Spyres come with those. People like NukeProof's version of semi-metallic also. Long technical trail descents might call for something else though. The noise factor will depend on moisture level.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

jbucky1
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2010 6:39 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
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by jbucky1

I would use resign /organic and get your brakes adjusted properly. So many times a lot more stopping power can be had with a good adjustment.

TheKaiser
Posts: 643
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:29 pm

by TheKaiser

Catagory6 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 1:38 am

if it matters, front rotor is 140mm Ice Tech RT99 Freeza
rear is 160 sram centerline x (2-piece)

is resin the same as organic?
is semi-metallic the same as sintered?
The terms resin and organic generally refer to the same type of pad, though the specific mix of stuff in the pad can vary from brand to brand, or even within brands for different models. For instance, EBC has a longer wearing green pad, and a faster wearing but higher powered red pad. These often have some sort of organic fibers held together within a resin binder, hence the two names being used interchangeably. Sometimes, they also have what you might consider to be synthetic fibers like kevlar in the mix.

Semi-metallic is usually a resin/organic pad, which has had some of the fiber content replaced with metallic bits. If you look at the face of a used semi-metallic pad, you will see a dark pad face with little shiny bits of copper or similar metal speckling it.

Sintered are essentially all metallic, and are made by squishing metal powder together at high heat and pressure, so it fuses together.

You will find different claims out there about which has the most power, or modulation, which can be frustrating. I think some of this comes from people generalizing about organic pads, when there can actually be a big difference between brands and models within the resin/organic category, as with the green/red models I mentioned above. Here is the EBC guide: https://ebcbrakes.com/wp-content/upload ... feb_17.pdf

For your needs, I'd consider that you can count on sintered being the longest wearing, particularly in the wet or muddy conditions. There are people who have burned through a set of organics in 1 ride if it is really gritty abrasive mud with a lot of hard grit. Since you have a mechanical rather than hydraulic brake, you don't need to worry about the greater heat transfer of the sintered pads overheating your fluid. Sintered will tend to be a bit louder, but that doesn't necessarily mean they'll squeel. Squeeling seems to really vary from bike to bike, and is difficult to predict. The noise that sintered consistently makes is a kind of grinding sort, which I hardly notice if moving at a good clip as it is overwhelmed by wind noise. Sintered also generally work better in the wet.

If you want to split the difference though, you could also go for the semi-metallics but, since power is a concern, I'd make sure you get whatever offering the company suggests for highest power, rather than their general use model, if they offer the option. If I were you, and was going on an extended trip, I'd pick up maybe 3 pairs, of maybe 2 or 3 different types, both so you have a spare set in case you burn through them, and so you can contrast and compare their performance and decide what you like best for future reference.

One other thing I should mention is that, if power is an issue, you might want to look at upsizing that front rotor to 160mm (with a corresponding swap of caliper adapter to reposition it). On steep descents, the front brake is doing the majority of the work, and 140mm on the front is really the bare minimum, and will require the pads to do much more of the work than if you had a 160.

P.S. Are you going to ride the Muddy Onion in Montpelier VT? My buddy was trying to get me to go up to that.

Catagory6
Posts: 399
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:36 am

by Catagory6

TheKaiser wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:23 pm
Catagory6 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 1:38 am

if it matters, front rotor is 140mm Ice Tech RT99 Freeza
rear is 160 sram centerline x (2-piece)

is resin the same as organic?
is semi-metallic the same as sintered?
The terms resin and organic generally refer to the same type of pad, though the specific mix of stuff in the pad can vary from brand to brand, or even within brands for different models. For instance, EBC has a longer wearing green pad, and a faster wearing but higher powered red pad. These often have some sort of organic fibers held together within a resin binder, hence the two names being used interchangeably. Sometimes, they also have what you might consider to be synthetic fibers like kevlar in the mix.

Semi-metallic is usually a resin/organic pad, which has had some of the fiber content replaced with metallic bits. If you look at the face of a used semi-metallic pad, you will see a dark pad face with little shiny bits of copper or similar metal speckling it.

Sintered are essentially all metallic, and are made by squishing metal powder together at high heat and pressure, so it fuses together.

You will find different claims out there about which has the most power, or modulation, which can be frustrating. I think some of this comes from people generalizing about organic pads, when there can actually be a big difference between brands and models within the resin/organic category, as with the green/red models I mentioned above. Here is the EBC guide: https://ebcbrakes.com/wp-content/upload ... feb_17.pdf

For your needs, I'd consider that you can count on sintered being the longest wearing, particularly in the wet or muddy conditions. There are people who have burned through a set of organics in 1 ride if it is really gritty abrasive mud with a lot of hard grit. Since you have a mechanical rather than hydraulic brake, you don't need to worry about the greater heat transfer of the sintered pads overheating your fluid. Sintered will tend to be a bit louder, but that doesn't necessarily mean they'll squeel. Squeeling seems to really vary from bike to bike, and is difficult to predict. The noise that sintered consistently makes is a kind of grinding sort, which I hardly notice if moving at a good clip as it is overwhelmed by wind noise. Sintered also generally work better in the wet.

If you want to split the difference though, you could also go for the semi-metallics but, since power is a concern, I'd make sure you get whatever offering the company suggests for highest power, rather than their general use model, if they offer the option. If I were you, and was going on an extended trip, I'd pick up maybe 3 pairs, of maybe 2 or 3 different types, both so you have a spare set in case you burn through them, and so you can contrast and compare their performance and decide what you like best for future reference.

One other thing I should mention is that, if power is an issue, you might want to look at upsizing that front rotor to 160mm (with a corresponding swap of caliper adapter to reposition it). On steep descents, the front brake is doing the majority of the work, and 140mm on the front is really the bare minimum, and will require the pads to do much more of the work than if you had a 160.

P.S. Are you going to ride the Muddy Onion in Montpelier VT? My buddy was trying to get me to go up to that.
yes, i'm doing that one. doing the Guilford GG, as well as, hopefully, all of the other ones up there this summer! its so freak'n steep up there

edit: got thos numbers reversed
160-f
140-r

octav
Posts: 200
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Bucharest

by octav

For TRP Spyre get some organic pads. They just work better, don't ask me why. I tried expensive Kool Stop/Swiss Stop ones but went out with organic Shimano 5Euros that work very very good.

by Weenie


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