Cyclocross - Light vs Tough? Or can you have both?

Especially for light weight issues concerning cyclocross / touring bikes & parts.

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mcbbcn
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 6:51 pm

by mcbbcn

Hi,

I am fortunate work in a place with a few bike mechanics and I had a chance to build my own fixie. I would like to buy a light cyclocross bicycle and by light I mean 5.5Kg to 6.5Kg. but my mechanics always tell me that going with lighter parts does not equal to going with stronger parts, and specially in cyclocross where bicycles take a beating, what kind of cyclocross bicycle would you recommend that is light and it won't need new parts every season?

I tried to look at the weight listings (http://weightweenies.starbike.com/articles.php) but they are organized by Road, Hardtails, Full Suspension and singlespeeders. I assume cross bikes will be under Road?

Anyway, if you have recommendations for light and tough cyclocross bikes based on your own experience, please share, I would like to learn more about it.

Thank you,

Miquel

mattr
Posts: 3506
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Using it to race cross or gravel trails and playing?

mcbbcn
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 6:51 pm

by mcbbcn

Race cross and playing with in trails...

Delorre
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 12:09 pm

by Delorre

If you start with a Scott Addict cross frame (around 1kg in hmx), put on DI2 disc, Red or etap hydro, roval clx 32 tubular wheels, ritchey superlogic finishing kit, a carbon saddle, you will be close to 6,5 kg with 100% reliability. From there, you can go further and use real WW parts also used in mtb (seatpost and stem f.ex). 6kg seems doable...

mcbbcn
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 6:51 pm

by mcbbcn

Delorre,

Thank you so much for sharing a starting point. I really appreciate it.

Best,

Miquel

Marin
Posts: 2754
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:48 am
Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

You'll be much lighter going with mechanical shifting, 1x, tubeless and canti brakes. Basically as light as an equivalent road bike + the heavier tires.

mattr
Posts: 3506
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Won't be hugely useful for actually racing cross. Or at least, not hugely durable.

mcbbcn wrote: and it won't need new parts every season?

Most of the weightweenie parts you'll need to get to 5.5 kg (or even 6.5 kg) *might* not last even an entire season.
All those shortcuts to reduce weight also reduce operating margin, so poorer seals, smaller bearings and so on.

With proper weenie bars/stem/post/saddle i'd probably be looking at budgeting for replacements yearly. Similar tale with wheels.

All that jumping on and off, bouncing off roots and rocks and the occasional fall doesn't do them any favours. Especially those less experienced riders, those ultra smooth lines the pros seem to take aren't actually that smooth to you or I and the seamless dismounts/remounts take months and months (years) of practice.

As the very trite, but accurate, saying goes. To finish first, first you must finish. Or some such gibberish.

You can probably get to the UCI limit or near enough with top end stock kit from mainstream manufacturers.
Last edited by mattr on Thu Jan 19, 2017 5:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mattr
Posts: 3506
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Double sodding post.
Last edited by mattr on Thu Jan 19, 2017 5:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Marin
Posts: 2754
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:48 am
Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

Full self quote do drive home your point?

I tend to agree though :)

I think you can do a relatively durable cross build well under 6.8kg though. My all-road build is close to 7kg with CX tires, and it's a 1500g ti frame, and definietly not all-out weenie.

boots2000
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 9:28 pm

by boots2000

Probably not- Since I have one with DI2 disc.
Though if you go for less aggressive tires you can get the weight down a bit-
Mine was just under 8 kg with DI2, tires with some meat, Enve M50 wheels, and SPD pedals.
In road setup it is more like- 7.8 kg.
Thing is the bike will not ride better at 6.5 kg.

If weight and a cross bike is your goal- stick to a canto frame. Something like an S-works crux for cantis.

Delorre wrote:If you start with a Scott Addict cross frame (around 1kg in hmx), put on DI2 disc, Red or etap hydro, roval clx 32 tubular wheels, ritchey superlogic finishing kit, a carbon saddle, you will be close to 6,5 kg with 100% reliability. From there, you can go further and use real WW parts also used in mtb (seatpost and stem f.ex). 6kg seems doable...

stormur
Posts: 1182
Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2014 3:50 pm
Location: FIN

by stormur

Crux is quiet heavy frame, even s-works so not best example ;) . Are lighter frames.

Canti over disc saves 400-500g. For lighter guys a lot, for heavier not so significant.

Question is will "light" canti fork chatter ? Yes, it will. Cannondale never figured out how to make non chattering fork for cross... Other brands did, even without support hanger ( vide Specialized, Trek ).

From my experience, lightest RELIABLE cross bike which can take anything seen at race , under 80-90kg rider has to be at minimum around 7.5kg in 1x11, 7.7-7.8kg for 2x11 . Below that you play in very dangerous game.

Pro's setups ( money is not a concern ) are around that weight / demanded reliability level : 2-3km minimum ( from pit to pit )... I mean canti frames, disc braked are naturally heavier. That's why you (usually ) won't see GCN guys weighting disc bikes, canti only ( and even here are scams / WvA Colnago @ 6.8kg without showing scale.... good joke :mrgreen: / .

Places which would be last on my "going light" list : skewers, amount of spokes in wheel, seatpost+clamp, stem+bar .

BTW I'd like to see specs of Marin 7 kg bike build on 1500g frame and zero weenie parts (naturally with pictures ;) ) or it didn't happened. I know it didn't, but just checking :) .

1100g frame, 450g fork, 1480g wheelset, Sram Red 22 + TRP Spyre SL, rest reasonably light ( even if alu parts -> weight close to light carbon ) will set weight around 8-8.5kg+ in "ready to ride" mode : pedals, 1 bottle cage, garmin sensors etc .

if memory serves well Felt 1X on DA Di2, rest really light , size M was 8.9kg on scale with pedals.

Can you build 6.8kg bike : yes. will it be reliable ? No. Not for you. For pro guy ? ...perhaps, however their bikes weight shows, that they want to add some weight to gain some strength/ reliability.
Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.
Mark Twain


I can be wrong, and have plenty of examples for that ;)

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