hub lacing

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Post Reply
520 Dan
Posts: 3308
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2003 4:15 am
Location: tucson
Contact:

by 520 Dan

is there anyway that I can safely lace a 32 hole hub to a 24 hole rim? I know this is grasping at straws here, but is there a way to skip 4 holes per side?

popawheelie
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2002 3:42 pm
Location: in Colorado

by popawheelie

If it is the front I don't see why not. But I've never done it and don't know a whole lot about these things. So don't read this. Or un-read it if you already have.

C-40
Posts: 554
Joined: Thu May 06, 2004 3:11 pm
Location: Detroit-USA
Contact:

by C-40

Now that is a quality answer!!!

weiwentg
Posts: 204
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2004 8:16 pm

by weiwentg

if you are talking about a rear wheel Dave Thomas at Speed Dream uses 2 driveside spokes to every nondrive spoke. I doubt he'd tell you how to do it, but I remember that it was something like 2x drive, 1x nondrive.
now, if you're talking about a front, I think I heard it done before, but I don't know where.

User avatar
jer
Posts: 558
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2003 8:45 pm
Location: Anchorage, AK

by jer

It would be a fun experiment. What kind of rim are you thinking? and front or rear?

Mr_Potatohead
Posts: 125
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 5:31 pm

by Mr_Potatohead

I've been thinking about this too. Isn't this basically what campy does with their G2(?) lacing pattern. Essentially you would radial lace the non-drive side, skipping every other hole in the flange of the hub. Then you would use every hole on the drive side of the hub and lace in a crossing pattern. Not sure whether it would end up being 1, 2 or 3 cross though.

So basically a 24 hole rim plus a 32 hole hub laced 16 on the drive and 8 on the non-drive side.

I suppose if you were really anal you could even fill the empty spoke holes with a rivet so you wouldn't have an open hole.

520 Dan
Posts: 3308
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2003 4:15 am
Location: tucson
Contact:

by 520 Dan

that might work, but i don't know if it would be strong enough because its for a rear wheel.

Mr_Potatohead
Posts: 125
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 5:31 pm

by Mr_Potatohead

520 Dan wrote:that might work, but i don't know if it would be strong enough because its for a rear wheel.


If I've counted correctly Campy only uses 21 spokes on their Eurus rear wheel

http://www.branfordbike.com/wheels/big/wh14bigb.html

So you'd be using more spokes than what seems to be a pretty strong wheel.

stiffness I would think would be a function of spoke gauge, number of spokes, and to a smaller extent lacing pattern.

I'll bet if you went straight 14 gauge on the radial side and mabe 14/15 on the drive side you'd end up being as stiff as a 14/17 all around wheel 32 spoke wheel.

I suppose if you wanted to be really anal you could calculate out cross sectional areas and angles and figure it out exactly.

User avatar
tommasini
Posts: 1296
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 6:48 am
Location: Central USA
Contact:

by tommasini

I've built 24 hole rims to 32 hole hubs in the front - radial pattern. No adjustments needed for spoke length - use 3 hub holes, skip one, etc. I currently ride 32 hole hub spokes using only 16 spokes. In both front and rear it is use 2 holes, skip 2 holes. In the rear this includes all drive side spokes with head facing in, all non-drive with head facing out. This is all done with 400 gram carbon rims for some piece of mind also.....

What I'm trying to impart is if you plan it out well (inlcuind chosing suitable strength spokes) there are many opportunies to make a strong non-standard wheel.

The one that interests me now is a rear 32 hole hub and rim, laced with 16 drive side, 8 non drive - paired up like Campy does..................yes

User avatar
Cyco
Posts: 1903
Joined: Sat Nov 30, 2002 4:49 am

by Cyco

tommasini wrote:The one that interests me now is a rear 32 hole hub and rim, laced with 16 drive side, 8 non drive - paired up like Campy does..................yes


First tried this when the deeper section rims came out, as they had the stiffness to pull this off, It works well but make sure you tape/glue up the unused spoke holes so the rims dont fill up with water :oops:

The non-drive spokes will come up to a much more even spoke tension to the drive side spoke. Go for it :)
Success is how far you you bounce back up after being knocked down

User avatar
cirroc
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2004 6:25 am

by cirroc

Here's an eBay listing which shows Zipp rims built front 16h (radial spoking) and rear 24h rim, 32h hub, 16 drive and 8 non-drive spokes (triplet spoking). Weight is under 1100g for the pair. Looks pretty nice!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3676685506&indexURL=0&photoDisplayType=2#ebayphotohosting

Rims: Zipp 280 carbon fiber rims, approximately 280 grams each, 38mm deep (for good aerodynamics). The front has 16 holes, the rear 24.

Hubs:

Front is the American Classic Micro hub ... with thick flanges to support the low spoke count.

Rear is the American Classic Ultralite Cassette ... 32-hole hub that has been laced with 16 spokes on the cassette side and 8 on the other side. This arrangement helps equalize the tension between the left and right side spokes, reducing the likelihood of spokes going slack and the wheel going out of true.

Spokes: 16 Alpina stainless steel aero (oval) spokes on the front wheel, laced in a one-cross pattern. 24 Hoshi stainless steel bladed spokes on the rear, 8 in a one-cross pattern on the left, 16 in a two-cross lacing on the right. This makes for a durable, low-maintenance wheel. Neither the Alpina nor the Hoshi spokes require the hubs to be slotted to accommodate them (a procedure that weakens the hub).

The wheels were built using the methods described in the standard text, 'The Bicycle Wheel' by Jobst Brandt, the spokes taken to uniform high tension and stress-relieved for durability.


And for further explanation from Dave's Wheels website:

http://www.speeddream.com/road.php

Rear wheels are 24-spoke triplet style - 16-drive side spokes, 2 crosses, and 8 non-drive side 1 cross pattern. The two to one distribution of rear spokes provides for greater drive torque and enhanced the overall strength and stiffness. This is the same spoking arrangement that I got started with in 1987; of course I copied it from "Hi E" wheels in 1979... The more things change the more they stay the same!
Attachments
zipp.jpg

Post Reply