Is an upgrade from 2010 supersix HM to 2015 Evo HM worthwhile?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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theStig
Posts: 253
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 1:22 am

by theStig

I've been riding a 2010 supersix himod ultimate off and on for a few years. Considering swapping the frameset with a 2015 Evo himod. (Keeping the rest of the bike as is - da9070, da 9000 c24TL) Can someone who has owned both comment as to how much difference there is? Weight Wise, I'm looking at saving approx 150g on paper, but who knows.

by Weenie


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C36
Posts: 832
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:24 am

by C36

Edit: brain fart... misread op asking non-eco to evo2 comparison...

Owned both Evo, one after the other and the second generation of SS evo is stiffer and snappier accelerating. Always felt the first generation a bit soft when changing rhythm. There might be a bit of size effect (went from a 52 to a 50 after a Guru fit). Never felt the confort gain some claim (felt it a lot more changing the Save post for a Darimo). For those who want to run fat “soft” tires you have more margin on this second generation.

In terms of weight saving, it comes with quite some lighter compression system (from 49 to 17g).




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Last edited by C36 on Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

theStig
Posts: 253
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 1:22 am

by theStig

Interesting. Are the forks interchangeable?

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Dan Gerous
Posts: 1338
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 6:28 pm

by Dan Gerous

C36 wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:15 pm
Owned both, one after the other and the second generation of SS is stiffer and snappier accelerating. Always felt the first generation a bit soft when changing rhythm. There might be a bit of size effect (went from a 52 to a 50 after a Guru fit). Never felt the confort gain some claim (felt it a lot more changing the Save post for a Darimo). For those who want to run fat “soft” tires you have more margin on this second generation.

In terms of weight saving, it comes with quite some lighter compression system (from 49 to 17g).
I find the opposite, my 2010 SuperSix (it wasn't a Evo yet, Evos were introduced only in mid 2011) felt stiffer than my 1st generation (mid 2011 to 2015) Evo but the Evo was more confortable and stuck to the ground better on rough roads, the 2010 could be a bit bouncy in the rear end when sprinting out of the saddle. Forks are not interchangable between the 2010 and 2015, I think they changed the lower headset bearing size when they introduced the Evo?

The 2nd generation Evo (2016 to 2019) though is the best of both worlds, the wider BB is much beefier than on the 1st gen Evo but still very comfy and glued to the road.

Both the frame and fork are lighter on the Evo than the 2010 SS though. 1st and 2nd gen Evos have similar frame weight but the 2nd gen has a much lighter fork.

Worthwile... it depends of the money involved I guess, but with a 3rd generation Evo out now, personally if I was in the same situation (and not wanting a 2020 Evo), I would look for a 2nd generation (2016-2019) Evo, you'd get the lowest weight, the stiffer BB, more comfort and more tire clearance, the 1st gen Evo was tight with 700x25s, 2nd gen can fit 28-30s.

theStig
Posts: 253
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 1:22 am

by theStig

thanks Dan and c36. truly appreciate you taking the time to respond, your answers really helped me decide. I'm going to hold off and look for a 2016-2019, seems like the way to go. Tire fitment is definitely an issue, and I did read about 700x25 clearance issues on the old evos. Funny, my 2010 himod ultimate accomodates 700x25 gp4000 just fine.

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C36
Posts: 832
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:24 am

by C36

Dan Gerous wrote:
C36 wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:15 pm
Owned both, one after the other and the second generation of SS is stiffer and snappier accelerating. Always felt the first generation a bit soft when changing rhythm. There might be a bit of size effect (went from a 52 to a 50 after a Guru fit). Never felt the confort gain some claim (felt it a lot more changing the Save post for a Darimo). For those who want to run fat “soft” tires you have more margin on this second generation.

In terms of weight saving, it comes with quite some lighter compression system (from 49 to 17g).
I find the opposite, my 2010 SuperSix (it wasn't a Evo yet, Evos were introduced only in mid 2011) felt stiffer than my 1st generation (mid 2011 to 2015) Evo but the Evo was more confortable and stuck to the ground better on rough roads, the 2010 could be a bit bouncy in the rear end when sprinting out of the saddle. Forks are not interchangable between the 2010 and 2015, I think they changed the lower headset bearing size when they introduced the Evo?
.
Dan thanks for correcting me... indeed totally misread the question and compared wrong generations.
I tried on few occasion the SS “non eco” HM and would agree with your overall comments. This generation was stiff but was feeling quite dead. Ok on the flat but really not pleasant on the climbs.


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C36
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by C36

Dan Gerous wrote:
C36 wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:15 pm
Owned both, one after the other and the second generation of SS is stiffer and snappier accelerating. Always felt the first generation a bit soft when changing rhythm. There might be a bit of size effect (went from a 52 to a 50 after a Guru fit). Never felt the confort gain some claim (felt it a lot more changing the Save post for a Darimo). For those who want to run fat “soft” tires you have more margin on this second generation.

In terms of weight saving, it comes with quite some lighter compression system (from 49 to 17g).
I find the opposite, my 2010 SuperSix (it wasn't a Evo yet, Evos were introduced only in mid 2011) felt stiffer than my 1st generation (mid 2011 to 2015) Evo but the Evo was more confortable and stuck to the ground better on rough roads, the 2010 could be a bit bouncy in the rear end when sprinting out of the saddle. Forks are not interchangable between the 2010 and 2015, I think they changed the lower headset bearing size when they introduced the Evo?
.
Dan thanks for correcting me... indeed totally misread the question and compared wrong generations.
I tried on few occasion the SS “non evo” HM and despite not having a large mileage on it, I would agree with your overall comments. This generation was stiff but was feeling quite dead. Ok on the flat but really not pleasant on the climbs.


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allenpg
Posts: 118
Joined: Tue May 20, 2008 5:34 am

by allenpg

I went from a 2012 Evo (non-HM) to a 2016 Evo HM, and noticed a (great) difference. Not only was the frame lighter and stiffer, but I liked the acceleration, climbing, and cornering better. I recently added a new Canyon Aeroad, which I love but in a different way. The only thing I didn't like about the 2016 Evo HMO was the 25.4 seatpost. However, everyone seems to be moving away from standard seatposts nowadays. Give it another year and all new road bikes will have boost hub spacing and dropper seatposts (HA...HA).

by Weenie


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