When does it end? The “better bike”

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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RocketRacing
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 2:43 am

by RocketRacing

I am a bit of a gearhead. I like to research, and i get far more enjoyment out of getting a nice used frame and building it up to something unique and special, then i do buying a top dollar brand new bike.

And new tech is sexy. Lighter, faster, stronger. Di2 and etap are must haves for any 2x setup imho. You are foolish not to run modern tires like a gp5000 (i like with latex tubes). Aero is key as a rider. Hidden cables are sexy. Etc.

But wireless 1x i am no sold on, as mechanical works fine out back imho. 12 speed offroad is not needed, as 32x50 or so is ludicrusly slow. Maybe on a 50lbs e fat bike it is useful. Etc.

I find myself enjoying my bikes, and planning for my new aero road disc bike this spring (to add to, not replace bikes in my fleet).

But when does it end? When does every bike converge on a dropped seat stays, disc brake, integrated cockpit, lightweight aero machine? We are getting close by the way. Will we ever be happy with what we have?

When do you draw the line? Or did you draw the line years ago... still screaming the praises of tubular wheels, mechanical shifting, and rim brakes? Or will you be tempted by 13 speed, lighter aero bikes, even wider aero rims, wider bb, cranks 4g lighter than last year, etc?

Just a thought

by Weenie


tabl10s
Posts: 530
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:40 am

by tabl10s

My problem is that I like everything to be of equal quality or my mind starts to run wild. From guitars to cameras to audio, the rule remains the same. No exceptions!

Oh, I never get the same thing twice. Ever!
| 2016 Rca: 11.07lbs/5.048kg...😭 | 2015 Pinarello F8: 13.04lbs/5.915kg...😩 | 2018 S-Works SL6: 12.04/5.625kg... 😥|2018 S-Works SL6 UL: 11.04/5.007kg... :cry:

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4301
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

Improvements are iterative/evolutionary most of time with a few revolutions here and there. Buy bikes you like at intervals you think make sense.

I am interested in 1x14 drivetrains. I am not tempted by 2x12. Lighter aero bikes are whatever...it's not exciting. I think deep rims will stay in the 30-32mm width range. I'm running 30mm tires on my shallow rims right now, but will be going back down to 28mm when race season starts. Wider BB, my physiology prefers a wider stance. All minor stuff...there's something for everyone.

For real innovation, I think major brands should offer no-questions asked replacement policies for a small premium. Call it crash/damage insurance or whatever. Maybe the first 2 years included (like Giant,) with the option to extend it to 5 years at the end of the initial 2 year period. This is one way to make a better bike without actually making a better bike.

LewisK
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2019 2:11 pm

by LewisK

Long live rim brakes, tubular wheels and 53/39 chainsets!

rlanger
Posts: 171
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2016 11:53 am

by rlanger

RocketRacing wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 5:15 am
Will we ever be happy with what we have?

When do you draw the line? Or did you draw the line years ago... still screaming the praises of tubular wheels, mechanical shifting, and rim brakes? Or will you be tempted by 13 speed, lighter aero bikes, even wider aero rims, wider bb, cranks 4g lighter than last year, etc?

Just a thought
I'm usually only truly happy with my bike when I'm out on the road riding it. Every ride I feel so grateful to have such an incredibly performing machine that gives me so much pleasure.

But, I also love to tinker and improve, so over time, I upgrade my bike when I see something new that catches my eye. I think I'm just about done though. I have the new Aerofly II handlebar on order, then I think the last upgrade for my current frame will be aero carbon wheels (currently running Fulcrum Racing Zeros so in no real hurry to add new wheels).

Etienne
Posts: 206
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 11:41 am
Location: France

by Etienne

RocketRacing wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 5:15 am
When do you draw the line? Or did you draw the line years ago... still screaming the praises of tubular wheels, mechanical shifting, and rim brakes? Or will you be tempted by 13 speed, lighter aero bikes, even wider aero rims, wider bb, cranks 4g lighter than last year, etc?
Think return on investment ... first of all, can you be sure that all those new bikes, parts, gruppos will actually have a positive impact (performance, fun ...) and then, are you sure that there's no better invested money in your personal life :?:

I am a father of 2 students, my priority is to finance university, engineering studies etc. ... so bikes are secondary and I will continue riding my tubular tires, mech shifting, rim brakes, 12 years old Ti bike then have fun and keep me fit. Well, OK, I bought a brand new all-road disc brakes large tire clearance Ti bike this year ... so one bike every 10 years, not bad.

Another draw line could be between "do I want" something just because it is cool, socially rewarding, aesthetically pleasing or just because I am a hoarder ... or "do I need" something to achieve a very specific goal ... then you're back to ROI :thumbup:

Dan112
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2018 7:14 am

by Dan112

It will never end there will always be something else we apparently need first it was lightweight, then aero was everything now its lightweight aero... it's all just marketing.

Thing you have to remember all this new technology comes out we apparently need. But the roads have never changed...

I got sucked into disc brakes being new to road I was told at my lbs I need them so took their advice. Now 2 years on i ride a rim brake bike. Discs are better brakes but the fact is 4 me at least and the riding I do they definitely weren't "needed".

As long as your bike feels great to you that's where it should end imo. All this technology say aero bikes most people cant hold a super aerodynamic position on the bike making it pointless. It does make me laugh seeing aero bikes out and about with 40mm of spacers under the stem. People tend to 4get aero frames are designed around a pro rider that is riding 30 hours plus a week and can hold a super aero position on the bike. Most people buy one dont ride in an aero position or moan that their back aches then wonder why. A D shaped seat post, integrated cables etc wont be the difference of winning and loosing in most 4 your average rider.

Tubeless I'm on the fence with I own a tubeless wheelset slr1 with pro1 tyres and a clincher set campag zondas with gp4000s and lightweight tubes. The tubeless ride a little nicer and 4 me that's as far as it goes really. I definitely wouldnt have gone out and brought a tubeless set they came with the bike. But again it's one of those things that are night and day in the marketing world when really when your out on the road the difference is tiny and normally it's in your head.

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4301
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

Dan112 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:28 am

As long as your bike feels great to you that's where it should end imo. All this technology say aero bikes most people cant hold a super aerodynamic position on the bike making it pointless. It does make me laugh seeing aero bikes out and about with 40mm of spacers under the stem. People tend to 4get aero frames are designed around a pro rider that is riding 30 hours plus a week and can hold a super aero position on the bike. Most people buy one dont ride in an aero position or moan that their back aches then wonder why. A D shaped seat post, integrated cables etc wont be the difference of winning and loosing in most 4 your average rider.

This is a logical fallacy.

*Most people* don't matter when it comes to aero bikes...or race bikes in general. Do you own a road race bike? Do you race? Should race bikes not exist because the vast majority who ride them won't ever pin a number?

JayDee81
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:45 pm

by JayDee81

Dan112 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:28 am
... when your out on the road the difference is tiny and normally it's in your head.

Dan112
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2018 7:14 am

by Dan112

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:34 am
Dan112 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:28 am

As long as your bike feels great to you that's where it should end imo. All this technology say aero bikes most people cant hold a super aerodynamic position on the bike making it pointless. It does make me laugh seeing aero bikes out and about with 40mm of spacers under the stem. People tend to 4get aero frames are designed around a pro rider that is riding 30 hours plus a week and can hold a super aero position on the bike. Most people buy one dont ride in an aero position or moan that their back aches then wonder why. A D shaped seat post, integrated cables etc wont be the difference of winning and loosing in most 4 your average rider.

This is a logical fallacy.

*Most people* don't matter when it comes to aero bikes...or race bikes in general. Do you own a road race bike? Do you race? Should race bikes not exist because the vast majority who ride them won't ever pin a number?
That's very true. I own a tcr advanced pro1 which I guess is a race bike and no I dont race. But 4 me I focus on climbing it was the bike that made sense for my budget plus the spec I was after. What I'm trying to get at is all this technology and stuff we apparently need is just marketing 99% of the time.

4 myself what would make the most difference is having the time to actually ride more then buying into new tech all the time.

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4301
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

Dan112 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:47 am

That's very true. I own a tcr advanced pro1 which I guess is a race bike and no I dont race. But 4 me I focus on climbing it was the bike that made sense for my budget plus the spec I was after. What I'm trying to get at is all this technology and stuff we apparently need is just marketing 99% of the time.

4 myself what would make the most difference is having the time to actually ride more then buying into new tech all the time.

So the guy who bought an aero bike could stand to lose a couple spacers. Now be truthful, could you stand to lose a couple of kilograms so you can climb faster on your lightweight TCR? If you can work to lose those kg, couldn’t the aero bike buyer work to gain more back strength and hip flexibility?

We’re all consumers here, we’re all riding bikes we don’t apparently need.

icantaffordcycling
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:03 am

by icantaffordcycling

I have recently been writing college application essays. I compared bikes to LEGO sets.
That kinda of plays into this conversation as well.
There is always a bigger, newer lego set.
Specialized Allez Sprint
Instagram || Shitposting is a god-given right. bannable offense.

brusselsprouts
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2017 3:14 am

by brusselsprouts

--
repost please delete.
Last edited by brusselsprouts on Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

brusselsprouts
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2017 3:14 am

by brusselsprouts

I thought the itch for faster, lighter, newer would go away early on in the cycling game. Then I found what a joy it is to ride a lighter machine - then what a joy it is to ride with better components - then how I cared about the aesthetics about what I ride. The truth is, the deeper one goes into the rabbit hole, the more enticing it is. It doesnt end.

morrisond
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 8:34 pm

by morrisond

LewisK wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:53 am
Long live rim brakes, tubular wheels and 53/39 chainsets!
What real men ride! Or at least it feels like it.

by Weenie


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