Which Frame and standover?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
RocketRacing
Posts: 929
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 2:43 am

by RocketRacing

Bigger Gear wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 7:19 pm
Hand numbness/hand pressure can be influenced by saddle position greatly. You may want to trial your saddle angle with a bit more nose up. This will shift your weight back and reduce pressure and fatigue in the arms and hands. Of course this only works if you can tolerate the increase in perineal pressure. If you go nose up a bit also maybe go down 2-3 mm.
Or 5mm down. ;-)

RocketRacing
Posts: 929
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 2:43 am

by RocketRacing

Karvalo wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 7:28 pm
If you send most of the time in the drops I would also roll the bars down a bit and move the hoods back up. Looks like they're in a better position for tops than drops right now.
Makes sense. I keep my hoods low for good lever access in the drops. I kind of got away from hoods due to poor brake control and aero

by Weenie


Karvalo
Posts: 745
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2018 6:40 pm

by Karvalo

RocketRacing wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:19 pm
Makes sense. I keep my hoods low for good lever access in the drops.
Yep, but it'll be better again if you move the bar down and readjust the hoods back. The lever blade will stay in the same place and the curve of the bar will match your neutral hand and wrist position better.

DaveS
Posts: 2628
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 1:26 pm

by DaveS

I always use a 25mm setback post and a combination of short reach Easton ec-90 bars and Campy shifters to allow the use of a 110mm stem. Shimano shifters appear to have a very long reach.

I also never use KOP to set the saddle position. Mine's always further back for climbing. The further back the saddle, the less weight on your hands. That's how I can tolerate a 10cm saddle to bar drop, even at age 66.

RocketRacing
Posts: 929
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 2:43 am

by RocketRacing

DaveS wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 11:07 pm
I always use a 25mm setback post and a combination of short reach Easton ec-90 bars and Campy shifters to allow the use of a 110mm stem. Shimano shifters appear to have a very long reach.

I also never use KOP to set the saddle position. Mine's always further back for climbing. The further back the saddle, the less weight on your hands. That's how I can tolerate a 10cm saddle to bar drop, even at age 66.
Does that mess with your knees? Or are my knee issues from other factors. My right kneecap clicks a lot. I tolerate my tt position much better (165mm cranks, very saddle forward)

Is it back for out of saddle climbing? I thought you want to be forward when climbing in the saddle?

Finally, when you put your saddle back, it should also drop a bit, right?

DaveS
Posts: 2628
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 1:26 pm

by DaveS

What bothers your knees is a highly debatable subject. I did a lot of heavy leg presses on a weight machine for many years, that undoubtedly contributed to three surgeries for torn meniscus. Small tears are trimmed off, leaving less material to resist wear in the future.

Placing the saddle further back usually suits the higher torque, lower cadence used while climbing seated. Moving the saddle forward promotes a higher cadence.

Of course you have to adjust the saddle height down a bit when the saddle is moved back.

If you have knee joint noises, you could already have damaged knee joints. X-rays are used to reveal the loss of cartilage by showing the space between the bones. If joint space is good, an MRI will be needed to reveal more.

As you age, arthritis can destroy the knee cartilage and eventually make knee replacements necessary. I had both knees replaced in 2017.

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