Lightweight frame and turbo trainers

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Froggy81
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2018 4:01 pm

by Froggy81

Dear all,

Is it recommended to put lightweight bike like emonda slr or cannondale supersix evo hm on the turbo trainer? Canyon clearly dont think its ok despite them supporting a e racing team...

Just some thoughts on this please

D

by Weenie


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Lewn777
Posts: 863
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:35 am

by Lewn777

Froggy81 wrote:
Tue Oct 01, 2019 4:56 am
Dear all,

Is it recommended to put lightweight bike like emonda slr or cannondale supersix evo hm on the turbo trainer? Canyon clearly dont think its ok despite them supporting a e racing team...

Just some thoughts on this please

D
I'd say it's not ideal. Personally I would always prefer aluminium dropouts or a totally aluminium frame bike for trainer work. Although really I doubt there is going to be any issue and manufacturers are just covering their themselves from warranty claims, if there are voids around the drop-outs. I did three months on my climbing bike with carbon dropouts on my turbo trainer last winter, with no issues. It's just something at the back of your mind, that makes you more reluctant to stand up and really hammer sprints.

Ideally it would be great to have an alloy or other metal bike for trainer/communting/winter riding/bikepaking than trying to use a favourite all-carbon bike for everything.

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wheelbuilder
Posts: 709
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:10 am

by wheelbuilder

You have to decide this for yourself. Seems like most frames don't have a problem with this, and you sure don't see it happening very often, but I imagine it does happen from time to time. That is a lot of side force being applied to a frame fixed at a point. Of all the years I worked at Trek Dealers, and then Trek owned shops, I had 1 Emonda SLR8 that the customer was forthcoming, and foolishly honest about the circumstances regarding the cracked non drive side chainstay. This of course was to his detriment unfortunately as Trek denied the warranty claim even though they do not specifically forbid the act of using a trainer, they surmised that the customer did not clamp it properly. This was a Project One frame up build that the customer probably spent 11,000 dollars with us on. Disgusting actions by Trek, but that is going off topic.
Never cheer before you know who is winning

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4295
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

Some trainers are better equipped to dissipate twisting loads at the dropouts than others. The Tacx Neo variants have some built-in flex in the folding legs. The Kinetic R1 has the Rock'n'Roll elastomer system.

I have put a cheap aluminum alloy bike through 700 hours of Zwift, including sprints, on a Cycleops Hammer. It honestly seems like the BB area is subject to the most stress, not the dropouts. For me the additional cost of buying a very basic aluminum bike to use as a permanent fixture was worth the peace of mind.

I have also changed my mind on the smartbike category. Considering how much time I spend indoors, I probably will swap over to a smartbike if my current setup should ever break (not likely for a very long time.)

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