opinions on Extralite Ti quick release skewers

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Boshk
Posts: 428
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:59 am

by Boshk

Trying to reduce the weight on my Colnago C60 within my budget.

Came across these
Extralite Streeters Road Ti quick release skewers black
https://www.starbike.com/en/extralite-s ... ers-black/

apparently 29g for the pair, extremely light compared to my stock Campagnolo skewers for my Bora's

Any experience with them?
Retaining mechanism and reliability etc?

by Weenie


alcatraz
Posts: 2541
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

I don't have direct hand experience. Mine are titanium 27gr of a different brand and I don't have any complaints.

I'm guessing though you'll hear some complaints about going so low on a colnago c60. This frame is famous for its stiffness which is what you will be compromising.

I'd say it depends on your weight, power, and sensitivity to stiffness. If you're like me, 65kg, struggling to push even 300w, and don't ride a stiff frame, then you'll likely not feel any difference between these skewers and heavier ones.

If you're heavier OR stronger OR can't ride anything noodly feeling, you'll likely dislike them.

Boshk
Posts: 428
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:59 am

by Boshk

alcatraz wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 5:39 am
I don't have direct hand experience. Mine are titanium 27gr of a different brand and I don't have any complaints.

I'm guessing though you'll hear some complaints about going so low on a colnago c60. This frame is famous for its stiffness which is what you will be compromising.

I'd say it depends on your weight, power, and sensitivity to stiffness. If you're like me, 65kg, struggling to push even 300w, and don't ride a stiff frame, then you'll likely not feel any difference between these skewers and heavier ones.

If you're heavier OR stronger OR can't ride anything noodly feeling, you'll likely dislike them.
Thanks, mind telling me which ones you are using?

I think $/gram, skewers are probably one of the 'cheaper' options.

alcatraz
Posts: 2541
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

I ride final11 skewers, butted titanium with carbon levers. They aren't made anymore. I got a set on chinese 2nd hand pages for like 20usd. Lucky me.

They aren't compatible with all wheel hubs. Some hubs require too much compression. I'd say if your endcaps are pressed on it's possible ultralight skewers could be a problem. If they are screwed on you have a better chance to get a slightly better fit with lower pressure.

My friend on a trek and bontrager wheels uses skewers twice the weight and his hands are nearly bleeding when tightening the skewers to avoid creaking. I don't have any such problems.

If you're looking for a no compromise light skewer its the lightweight ones. They use steel rods and weigh somewhere around 50gr.

Boshk
Posts: 428
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:59 am

by Boshk

alcatraz wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 7:49 am
I ride final11 skewers, butted titanium with carbon levers. They aren't made anymore. I got a set on chinese 2nd hand pages for like 20usd. Lucky me.

They aren't compatible with all wheel hubs. Some hubs require too much compression. I'd say if your endcaps are pressed on it's possible ultralight skewers could be a problem. If they are screwed on you have a better chance to get a slightly better fit with lower pressure.

My friend on a trek and bontrager wheels uses skewers twice the weight and his hands are nearly bleeding when tightening the skewers to avoid creaking. I don't have any such problems.

If you're looking for a no compromise light skewer its the lightweight ones. They use steel rods and weigh somewhere around 50gr.
Thanks Alcatraz, found a LBS that has Lightweight SSP2 skewer in stock, apparently 44g for a set. Let you know the actually weight when I get it.

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nickf
Posts: 877
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:34 pm

by nickf

I have been using steeters for over a year and no issues. They have been used on both carbon and steel bikes. They were questionable at first but have been proven to be reliable. Lever action is also super smooth.
Last edited by nickf on Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

robertbb
Posts: 1313
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 3:35 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

by robertbb

If there is one part of your bicycle not to skimp on for a few lousy grams, it's the part that keeps the wheels on.

Just my 2c.

Boshk
Posts: 428
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:59 am

by Boshk

robertbb wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 11:58 am
If there is one part of your bicycle not to skimp on for a few lousy grams, it's the part that keeps the wheels on.

Just my 2c.
that is very true. My thinking is Lightweight wheels are pretty reputable, so I'm hoping their skewers should be too.

I tried searching under their website for Meilenstein wheelset and what the included skewers are, doesn't actually say, just a photo.

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nickf
Posts: 877
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:34 pm

by nickf

robertbb wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 11:58 am
If there is one part of your bicycle not to skimp on for a few lousy grams, it's the part that keeps the wheels on.

Just my 2c.
I have been using Ti skewers for years. Everything from KCNC, Extralite, Tune, all have performed flawlessly. Extralite skewers are secure, deep threads on the nut side of the skewer. It's cheaper to manufacture a heavy skewer. Not as much CNC work and labor has to go into them. Just because a part is lightweight doesn't mean it's not properly engineered.

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Alexbn921
Posts: 330
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:39 pm

by Alexbn921

QR skewers should only be steel! Ti is not strong enough and will flex. This is flex you can feel and will negatively affect your handling and overall solidity of the bike. Some people don't care, but it's an overall performance hit to save a couple grams.

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pdlpsher1
Posts: 2478
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

+1 on what Alex has said but the rod doesn't necessarily have to be steel. I have experimented with many light QRs and the only one I'd use is the Mavic QRs with Ti rods at 87g. a pair. The Ti rod is non-butted and at 4.7mm in diameter. It also has an internal cam. I have tried the Extralite Aliens 4 with 3.8mm butted Ti rod and it was a major fail.

tmchen
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2014 7:12 am

by tmchen

Using CADEX Ti QRs now. They feel as solid as my previous fulcrum QRs. 56g a pair and made by Giant. Image


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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nickf
Posts: 877
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:34 pm

by nickf

I can't tell a difference using my Extralite skewers vs a pair of beefy Paul component stainless internal cam skewers. Skewers just have one job, clamp wheel into the dropout. The QR is subjected to clamping forces. A Ti rod can handle plenty of tension. The hub axle/dropout interface is the one taking the load. All you need is a strong enough clamping mechanism so the skewer doesn't physically slip out of the dropout. How was the Extralite a major fail?

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Alexbn921
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Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:39 pm

by Alexbn921

All materials have a modulus of elasticity. Steel has twice the tensile strength and much higher elongation before Breaking. Basically steel will stretch half as much as Ti and will withstand much higher loads without catastrophically failing. We are talking about 5mm skewers and ti will allow enough elongation for the hub to move around in the dropouts regardless of how tight it is clamped. This usually doesn't result in total failure of the interface, but does cause vagueness and brake rub.

I wouldn’t call it dangerous, but if your big or strong then Ti not the best option.

by Weenie


robertbb
Posts: 1313
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 3:35 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

by robertbb

Alexbn921 wrote:
Thu Sep 12, 2019 11:44 pm
All materials have a modulus of elasticity. Steel has twice the tensile strength and much higher elongation before Breaking. Basically steel will stretch half as much as Ti and will withstand much higher loads without catastrophically failing. We are talking about 5mm skewers and ti will allow enough elongation for the hub to move around in the dropouts regardless of how tight it is clamped. This usually doesn't result in total failure of the interface, but does cause vagueness and brake rub.

I wouldn’t call it dangerous, but if your big or strong then Ti not the best option.
Exactly. And not even limited to flyweights either, if you're handling the bike in any kind of spirited way there will be a difference.

I went from Kinlin XR200's laced to DT hubs (24/28) and used to use Ti skewers (C-4 branded, but pretty much KCNC). I never thought there was an issue at all....

Then I went to Zonda's and used the stock Campy steel-axled skewers.

And despite the 230g weight difference, the heavier setup was better in absolutely every possible way - including uphill.

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