New pain/numbness in one hand

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
zefs
Posts: 438
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:40 pm

by zefs

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Mon Aug 19, 2019 6:51 am
zefs wrote:
Mon Aug 19, 2019 6:46 am
He explains fit very well and in an easy to understand way, not sure what you were expecting.

Basically I was expecting this https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr43Lg ... M00L1xJb4A
Another great channel with a lot of info yeah.

CrankyCarbon
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:15 pm

by CrankyCarbon

mvcap wrote:
Sun Aug 18, 2019 1:30 am
Thanks for the input so far. All good advice! Exercises, dr's, etc may all help.

However, my issue is on the bike, only. I am looking for position/setup mod ideas to put myself in a better position on the bike. I'd prefer to keep it simple for a starting point and not have to book appointments, deal with waiting rooms, etc.

As in my original post... My question is, where could I experiment with setup changes to alleviate this?
@AJS914 @mvcap
I'm also 53. Though I've been riding nearly my whole life, was a pro racer for a short time (several decades ago but still used a racer setup until recently), and have had some recent major health issues which have modified my riding position.

For instance, due to some major recent nueromuscular issues I had to make a few changes. The nueromuscular problem was/is causing problems from my feet all the way up to my neck and hands especially on the left side.

The first change, due to some significant shoulder pain, I had to reduce the width of my bars. I always rode with wider bars for better leverage for sprinting and hill climbing. So I went from 46 to 44, this alleviated the shoulder pain, and also lifted up my torso ever so slightly and changed my hand on the hoods position ever so slightly.

after that change appeared to work positively, (I made one change at a time), due to the nueromuscular issues in the neck (and arthritis etc) I also reduced my stem length 10mm, from 110 to 100. I also raised my bars slightly about 5-10mm depending which bike (I changed 2 bikes).
My head/neck position is not tilted up like most riders but more inline with the spine in which I use my eyes to look up/forward more than raising my head.

I also lowered my seat about 1mm+, which may not seem like much but relaxed my legs and allowed a slight weight shift back reducing more weight from my shoulders/neck. Although I've always maintained a more nuetral weight distribution of which I shifted due to the circumstances. for "racing posture" not a "you're getting older now posture"

Another thing to look at - your shifter hood angle. make sure it is flat or maybe even slightly upwards. All depending upon everything else of course. If you have weight going forward the slight hood angle will help support that weight. You can "test" this just by rotating your handlbars more or less if they aren't integrated. Many riders bars tend to rotate forward/down over time and are never corrected.

Overall what you'll want to do is track where you have any pain in what situation. On the front of the hoods, back of the hoods, on the edge of the handlebars, etc etc. The way you ride your bike may have impact too, many riders "lock" their elbows, which can cause hand/shoulder pain - may riders say they don't do it either until you poke them while riding to show them that they are.

To alleviate some hand pain I was getting I put padding underneath the hoods. This helped initially on shorter rides but longer rides actually caused pain, so I removed it. Of course your selected handlebar tape may help or not too depending upon the padding.

But to better analyze your situation you'll have to track more specifics overall. Whether you work with someone or not all this information is going to help immensely as you have to fit different age riders differently for different situations for different riding goals and styles (not every one is a racer).

Of course, your rubber hoods may be worn down too and new ones may be needed. Or better gloves.

I hope what I've been through may help you a bit. But I'm also very experienced in cycling and have been taught bike fit and biomechanics by us and european professionals, although "old tech" stuff from years ago although I try to keep up with recent education.

I have the complete measurements of my bikes over time so I know the "evolution" of age for me specifically. This really helps too when one looks for a new frame in the future.

by Weenie


Etienne
Posts: 192
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 11:41 am
Location: France

by Etienne

CrankyCarbon wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 2:46 pm
The way you ride your bike may have impact too, many riders "lock" their elbows, which can cause hand/shoulder pain - may riders say they don't do it either until you poke them while riding to show them that they are.
Hi, what do you mean by "locking their elbows" ? Is it keeping their arms straight without a little "play" in the elbows to absorb buzz ?

CrankyCarbon
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Aug 13, 2019 1:15 pm

by CrankyCarbon

Etienne wrote:
Thu Aug 22, 2019 8:45 am
CrankyCarbon wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 2:46 pm
The way you ride your bike may have impact too, many riders "lock" their elbows, which can cause hand/shoulder pain - may riders say they don't do it either until you poke them while riding to show them that they are.
Hi, what do you mean by "locking their elbows" ? Is it keeping their arms straight without a little "play" in the elbows to absorb buzz ?
Yes. If you put your arm straight out where your lower and upper arms are straight then that would be "locking the elbows"
If on a smooth surface and riding straight it wouldn't matter much.
On any rougher surface the bent elbow will allow the arms to absorb shock as if acting like a shock absorber. Otherwise the road shock is transmitted to the shoulders and the hands absorb the initial "road shock".

Of course, I do have to add, this may be variable depending upon the bike setup. If the stem/hb isn't positioned more forward it may not allow one to bend one's elbow as much as may be needed. Which if course is dependent upon torso length, arm length, riding style, seat position, etc.

I should also add, many riders slouch their shoulders while riding too which affects the overall posture and can cause problems.
Locking elbows also may affect emergency braking where your body weight moves forward quickly and the wrist is a pivot point and the body movement is up/forward versus the bent arms being able to absorb some/most of that movement.
The older you get, the more squeaks and rattles are noticeable.

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