Disc or Rim brakes on upcoming Field Cycles Stainless steel frame

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Calnago
Posts: 8425
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Rim for sure and I’ll take it one step further and say Standard Mount rim brakes. They are nicer than the Direct Mounts. I know I hear people cringing, but I’ve now had plenty of a go with Direct Mounts to be able to say that. Direct mounts were a bodge from the get go when they thought why could stick them underneath the Bottom
Brackets of tri bikes then market the aero benefits, really. Anyway, that experiment pretty much faded away and at that point so should have the direct mount brake. And especially if you go with with Campy, the SR Standard Mount calipers are absolutely superb and so elegant. Their DM offering isn’t even series specific and was made because well, they needed an offering so the pro teams with bikes that only took DM brakes could stay within sponsor products. Shimano DM and STD mounts are functionally identical. Going forward there should be two basic braking options for road brakes... Standard mount rim brakes and Disc Brakes. If you want to go larger than a 28mm tire then disc is really your only option, but unless you’re building a full duty gravel grinder, cross bike, or mountain bike... and for a build like this especially, go with standard mount rim and be happy and don’t look back. I’ve seen a few beautiful Fields. Post it up here when you’re all done.
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GothicCastle
Posts: 233
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 1:52 am

by GothicCastle

This kind of depends on what kind of riding you do. If you live in the alps (or something like that), the modulation and lack of hand fatigue is pretty nice. Being able to brake later, more consistency in the rain, etc.

If none of that applies, a nice mechanical group (Dura Ace, Record) on a modern steel frame is so good. The simplicity, the feel; it is visceral. I grab my Nemo Tig as often as any of the other bikes because it is just fun.

I don't doubt that rim brakes will be around for quite a while. You can still buy quill stems and square taper bottom brackets, for example.

by Weenie


joejack951
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Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 6:50 pm
Location: Wilmington, DE

by joejack951

GothicCastle wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 3:31 am
I don't doubt that rim brakes will be around for quite a while. You can still buy quill stems and square taper bottom brackets, for example.
The quality of what is available will likely be the biggest issue faced by some, as any owner of a high end 7/8/9/10 speed group can likely attest. Sure, you can still buy shifters and derailleurs compatible with those older groups but mixing Claris and Ultegra isn’t going to sit well with just about anyone.

Likewise, try finding a decent 1 1/8” straight steerer fork, especially a disc version. Or a 52/42/30 triple (still my favorite crankset). While rim brakes were obviously used for longer periods than any of my examples, the likelihood of them eventually being met with a similar fate has to be fairly high. It’s just how the industry works.

Then again, maybe disc brakes will end up just like press fit BBs.

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Alexbn921
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Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:39 pm

by Alexbn921

Lol. Disks are great if you need them. I think they are head and shoulders better, but add weight and complexity. They are the future and will be standard of all high end groups. Rim brakes will only live on on boutique brands and custom bikes. The cross over will take a decade, unlike mountain biks that changed in a matter of years and continue to change at way to fast a rate.

brendanfoo
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:55 am

by brendanfoo

Thank you all for your detailed and insightful input on this matter. I have just emailed the builder and asked him for his opinion on this as well. I am moving to London in Sept and plan to use this bike for either short cafe rides or long distance rides >120kms. I have a rim Allez Sprint right now which will continue to be my beater bike. I get that the general consensus is that I should go ahead with rim brakes. While this will most definitely not be my last frame, I am hopping that this frame will last me a lifetime. Thus,avalabilty of parts in the long run is essential to me.

Marin
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Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:48 am
Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

There are bikes from the 1930s and 1950s out there that are still being ridden. Your rim brakes won't wear out. Stock up on pads and you can ride your bike for as long as civilization still existst ;)

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nickf
Posts: 802
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:34 pm

by nickf

The used market will be around for a long while to keep us stubborn types on the road. I still buy new OG1090 cassettes, plenty of them floating around out there still. Even going to disc there is no guarantee that the flat-mount standard will still be around in 20 years down the road. What then? Maybe the rear derailleur mount will change, then what? Standards come and standards go. My next frame will be getting T47, just so I can run any crankset. That's my only thought of planning for the future.

AJS914
Posts: 3398
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

If I were buying a new bike today I'd go rim. For me they are just easier to maintain. I wouldn't worry about not being able to get parts. For the useful life of a bike I think they will be making parts 10+ years from now. If they stopped making rim brakes, that assumes the entire market goes disc. Today, Pros are still riding rim brakes at the highest level. Rim brakes could become a small niche like tubulars and that would be ok.

Personally I struggle a bit with my hydraulic systems. The disc brakes on my cross bike went flat over the summer when I was riding my road bike. A couple of hours bleeding them with an oily mess of DOT3 fluid pushes me towards rim brakes on a road bike. My MTB brakes went flat during the winter. I tried to bleed those and failed. Now I might have to rebuild the caliper and if that doesn't work the master cylinder. I just find the maintenance to be a PITA. And I'm a good wrench. I've been working on bikes and cars for 40+ years.

I still want discs and tubeless on the mountain and cross bikes but for the next road bike I'll stick with rim brakes. I don't live in the alps or have excessive braking needs.

I'm also turned off by road hydro lever pricing. For example, Campagnolo Record 12 hydro levers and brake calipers are $1000!

keaton
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 7:03 pm

by keaton

Rim.

The marketing, and mostly 'journalists' finally got to me. I had to at least give disc and try so I could have first hand experience before I pass judgement. Completely underwelmed. idk I guess disc were hyped too much. Anyway, Id go rim.

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Alexbn921
Posts: 207
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:39 pm

by Alexbn921

I just sold my rim bike after building up a new version of the same frame with disk. I did a test ride to make sure everything was working before the sale and it took 3x the hand force to slow down. It immediately reinforced why I had switched to disks. :D The guy taking it for a test ride commented on how much better the rim brakes where then on his current bike. :lol:

mrfish
Posts: 1665
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 12:49 pm
Location: Near Horgen, Switzerland

by mrfish

silvalis wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 2:36 am
robertbb wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:21 am
mrfish wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 8:21 pm
I’m happy with my AC3 Shamals in the mountains
No such thing.

Your AC3 Bora's...
Your alloy or mille Shamals...

(PS: I agree with your sentiments though)
Maybe he's got Shamals on the front, Bora AC3 on the back :D

Or a Bora AC3 on the front, Shamal on the back for that "My rear was flat right before the group ride so I threw my alloy rim on the back" look.


He has AC3 Bora 35s :)

And after the epic Granfondo Marmotte Tour des Stations a few weeks ago he’s still happy. 5000m climbing in 140 km including the last climb on gravel. First 2 hours in the rain, then fog on descents like skiing in a whiteout. Braking in the wet was great. Did not crash. I’m not light and live in the foothills of the alps.

The key to good braking is the right rims/pads. I got rid of some Enve wheels because after the first ride in the wet I thought they were going to kill me as it took 5 looong seconds before braking started. My Marmotte ride buddy’s cheap Chinese wheels braking was non existent in the wet, so he dragged the brakes, then the front delaminated.

spartacus
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:53 pm

by spartacus

If you go discs your axle style might go extinct sooner than you’d like, that would be my only hesitation.

ChiZ01
Posts: 288
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 6:20 pm

by ChiZ01

steel frame is already heavy enough, why makes it more so with disc? do you enjoy riding 20lb+ bikes?

rollinslow
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:25 am

by rollinslow

For something like custom steel that you've waited years for, I would strongly argue for rim brakes to stick with the classic nature of the frame. It's not a venge, or some other modern carbon aero machine. This will keep the weight down and always be in fashion. I also think it makes zero sense for Campy and Shimano to stop making rim brakes in their top offering because it would alienate a lot of us who buy super expensive bikes.

Sounds like it will be an awesome bike either way!

by Weenie


rollinslow
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:25 am

by rollinslow

GothicCastle wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 3:31 am
This kind of depends on what kind of riding you do. If you live in the alps (or something like that), the modulation and lack of hand fatigue is pretty nice. Being able to brake later, more consistency in the rain, etc.

If none of that applies, a nice mechanical group (Dura Ace, Record) on a modern steel frame is so good. The simplicity, the feel; it is visceral. I grab my Nemo Tig as often as any of the other bikes because it is just fun.

I don't doubt that rim brakes will be around for quite a while. You can still buy quill stems and square taper bottom brackets, for example.
This is a bit much, there is no shortage of 10k + bikes rolling around new on rim brakes. I don't see any quill stems winning the Tour de France but maybe Ineos is just completely out dated desite being filthy rich. Get whatever you brakes you want, having options is nice.

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