Slammed Stem After Bike Fit.

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Js2
Posts: 117
Joined: Mon May 08, 2017 6:55 pm

by Js2

^ This :thumbup:

by Weenie


zefs
Posts: 438
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:40 pm

by zefs

To lean off you need to lower your torso and that equals to turning faster which equals with the bike being more agile at that moment.
Same thing would apply to a lesser extent by changing the handlebar height.

Anyhow this topic has derailed.

devonbiker
Posts: 70
Joined: Wed May 30, 2018 1:26 pm

by devonbiker

Mr.Gib wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:23 pm
devonbiker wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:02 am
Yes, I feel more engaged when I am closer to the road. It's quite simple really.
Still don't understand. What does engaged mean? More traction? You are more motivated? You can see the road better because your face is closer to it? Your going to marry your bike and you have set a wedding date? Is it really quite simple?

devonbiker wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:02 am
The thing that stands out to me looking at that rider is that he is probably on a frame one size too small, as with most pro riders. So he can have a lot of seatpost showing and run a 130 stem. Look at this back, it's almost horizontal on the drops. He's slammed the stem and the frame also has a short head tube so he can get his upper back and shoulders as low as possible.
Frames size is irrelevant to the issue of weight back or forward when cornering. You said weight forward was better for cornering. I said no, weight back is often better. I showed a photographic example. And you wrote the above complete non-sequitur about frames size. And BTW, Cancellara is not on a smaller frame so he can "have a lot of seatpost showing" and "run a 130 stem". It is to acheive low enough shoulders without having to bend his arms so much that his triceps get fatigued. C'mon man. And I'd argue that that frame is not too small but I digress.

devonbiker wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:02 am
If I was on a medium frame instead of a ML I would probably run a spacer and/or a longer stem.
Run a spacer? Wait a minute - you said slammed was better. Are you changing your opinion? Maybe you should just ride a Defy!

Again, forgive my sarcasm and trolling, but you need to lay off just throwing out some random combination of ideas and cliches you picked up here and there when it comes to fitting advice. It brings down what is generally a very high standard of the quality of information here on WW's. Also know when to quit.
I don’t know you but you sound a bit stupid.

Obviously riding a smaller frame will allow you to have your saddle higher and front end lower as the head tube will be shorter and the shorter top tube will allow you to run a longer stem. This results in a horizontal back and a very aggressive riding position. I couldn’t achieve such an aggressive position on my bike even with a slammed stem simply because I have not gone down a frame size.

Yes I do feel like the TCR handles better with a slammed stem. Obviously the front end will be more responsive as you are leaning into corners with the handlebar clamped via the stem to a lower part of the steerer tube. That’s basic physics.

Hexsense
Posts: 952
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2015 12:41 am

by Hexsense

zefs wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 9:47 pm
To lean off you need to lower your torso and that equals to turning faster which equals with the bike being more agile at that moment.
Same thing would apply to a lesser extent by changing the handlebar height.
I'm still don't get what are you confusing. The lower CG make the bike more stable and can corner a bit harder before sliding out. But it require more rider input and slower to initiate the change of direction -> less agile.

You can lean forward all you want but the bike isn't going to turn side way.
What make it turn, other than counter steering on handle bar which also make the bike lean, is side way off balance input from the rider that make the bike lean. That can be achieve at whatever height. Actually, when CG is taller it is easier to make the bike go off balance than when CG is low. So lower CG (bar height) may help some rider feel more confident in leaning it deeper side way. But higher CG set-up simply require less lean angle to achieve the same amount of off balance.

Higher CG require less lean angle to get the same turn -> less rider input to turn. Is it more agile than low and more stable CG that require the rider to go further off balance? :noidea:

=======
To OP: Try lower the bar slowly. notice when your power drop and back off a little bit. The bar height that you can not handle anymore during the ride is way past the point where you can start to lose power.

Karvalo
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Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2018 6:40 pm

by Karvalo

devonbiker wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 10:13 pm
I don’t know you but you sound a bit stupid.
He doesn't....

Mr.Gib
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Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

Hexsense, Karvalo, thanks but I think we are wasting our time. Most of the responses don't even relate to what is being discussed. It's weird, we live in physical world but perhaps relating to physics is more of a challenge than I assume. It's reads more like a language barrier than a problem with physics. And if anyone is by chance not a native English speaker, than total respect to you and appologies if I was a bit rough.

I mean, what do you do with this?:
devonbiker wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 10:13 pm
Obviously the front end will be more responsive as you are leaning into corners with the handlebar clamped via the stem to a lower part of the steerer tube.
I thought lower resulted in better engagement. OK so now it's responsiveness. I guess that means less rider input = more steering? A fascinating proposition when the trail stays constant. Sheesh.

The OP has probably shot himself in the head by now. OP, if you are still alive don't be afraid to experiment with the height of the front end. Remember you have to be comfortable or the sport isn't as much fun. And you're allowed to bend your elbows if you need to get lower on occasion. As long as the fitter put your saddle in the right spot, than it's cool to mess with bar position and find out what you like.
Last edited by Mr.Gib on Fri Jul 12, 2019 12:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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LouisN
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by LouisN

:lol: :lol: :lol:


LOuis :)

tabl10s
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by tabl10s

Mr.Gib wrote:
Fri Jul 12, 2019 12:38 am
Hexsense, Karvalo, thanks but I think we are wasting our time. Most of the responses don't even relate to what is being discussed. It's weird, we live in physical world but perhaps relating to physics is more of a challenge than I assume. It's reads more like a language barrier than a problem with physics. And if anyone is by chance not a native English speaker, than total respect to you and appologies if I was a bit rough.

I mean, what do you do with this?:
devonbiker wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 10:13 pm
Obviously the front end will be more responsive as you are leaning into corners with the handlebar clamped via the stem to a lower part of the steerer tube.
I thought lower resulted in better engagement. OK so now it's responsiveness. I guess that means less rider input = more steering? A fascinating proposition when the trail stays constant. Sheesh.

The OP has probably shot himself in the head by now. OP, if you are still alive don't be afraid to experiment with the height of the front end. Remember you have to be comfortable or the sport isn't as much fun. And you're allowed to bend your elbows if you need to get lower on occasion. As long as the fitter put your saddle in the right spot, than it's cool to mess with bar position and find out what you like.
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zefs
Posts: 438
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:40 pm

by zefs

Oversteer,sliding out,more rider input... sounds like F1 rather than rode bike.
Do you also swift your body weight back if the road turn is straight and not downhill and does that make you turn faster?

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