Replacing plastic Campgnolo 2.3mm Cassette spacer with 2.2mm?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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3Pio
Posts: 1260
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 7:13 pm

by 3Pio

I have isuess with Campagnolo Plastic 2.3mm Cassette spacer, beeing easy broken few times on my Chorus Cassetes... Im using Torque Wrench, and torque the cassette lock ring in the specification range... (In the middle of the range)...

I just checked the price of new 2.3 mm spacers, and is just not worth the money.. Over priced totaly (especially when i include shipping cost)

So since i have good luck 2.2 mm spacer, and have few of them.. Is it possible to replace this fragile 2.3mm spacer with more durable 2.2mm?

I guess 0.1mm wont make some big difference?

What are other members experiences about this?

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Calnago
Posts: 8549
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

When Campy first came out with 11sp in 2009, that particular spacer was like the others. It was very difficult to dial out a very slight, but annoying, tick as the chain would just nick against an area of the next largest cog. It was certainly useable, but just not perfect. They made a running change and that slightly thicker spacer is the result. It’s not even a full 0.1mm thicker, but that’s the closest rounding to a tenth of a mm. And although it does seem to be the only spacer that I’ve ever noticed to break, I’d still use it. I bought a box of 3 or however many came in the Campy “packs” at the time just so that I could replace them on early 11sp cassettes I come across that did not have this spacer.
Oh, and the torque for the lockring is not a “range”... it’s 40Nm.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

by Weenie


3Pio
Posts: 1260
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 7:13 pm

by 3Pio

Calnago wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 3:30 pm
When Campy first came out with 11sp in 2009, that particular spacer was like the others. It was very difficult to dial out a very slight, but annoying, tick as the chain would just nick against an area of the next largest cog. It was certainly useable, but just not perfect. They made a running change and that slightly thicker spacer is the result. It’s not even a full 0.1mm thicker, but that’s the closest rounding to a tenth of a mm. And although it does seem to be the only spacer that I’ve ever noticed to break, I’d still use it. I bought a box of 3 or however many came in the Campy “packs” at the time just so that I could replace them on early 11sp cassettes I come across that did not have this spacer.
Oh, and the torque for the lockring is not a “range”... it’s 40Nm.

So as i understund u, i can replace for a while this 2.3mm spacer with 2.2mm withou any big issue... Regarding the torque, seem that i found my mistake here...

Somehow i understund that there is torque range here 40nm-50nm, and i was going 45 nm (in the middle of what i thought is a range..)



I double checked this: https://www.campagnolo.com/media/files/ ... 18_ENG.pdf

And seem that on Chorus Record SuperRecord is 40nm, while on other cassettes 50nm


p.s. Ouch.. I just checked and 2.3mm spacer is 14 eur without shipping :(

Anyway, good to know to dont go over 40nm

Alexandrumarian
Posts: 448
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 6:34 pm
Location: Romania

by Alexandrumarian

You can superglue a normal spacer to a sheet of paper then trim the excess. Press it well, dont want too much glue to thicken the sandwich. Typical paper is from 0.07 to 0.1mm


Other than this i didn't even know there is a special spacer in there. Luckily mine never broke or fall off the cluster.

mattr
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Only issue with 40Nm is unless you spend thousands, your torque wrench will be out by ~10% anyway. Depending on when it was calibrated and how good it is anyway......

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Calnago
Posts: 8549
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Most reasonably priced torque wrenches are calibrated and have a stated accuracy to within 4% or less. Older Campy cassettes used to be 50Nm, but both Campy and Shimano are 40Nm these days. Point is, it’s pretty tight. And I don’t know that going over this spec by 5Nm would be the cause of your cracked spacer. Do make sure it’s seated properly in the cog cluster during assembly however.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

jih
Posts: 257
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:54 pm

by jih

Paper not the most durable solution if you ride in the rain. Thin foil could be better perhaps?

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Dan Gerous
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2007 6:28 pm

by Dan Gerous

I've built custom adjusting shims for another purpose on a bike out of old beer cans once... not sure how thin it is, but it's durable.

Alexandrumarian
Posts: 448
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 6:34 pm
Location: Romania

by Alexandrumarian

jih wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:28 pm
Paper not the most durable solution if you ride in the rain. Thin foil could be better perhaps?
Impregnated with superglue it kinda turns into a sort of plastic. I doubt it can absorb much water and even if it could, the edge is quickly covered by chain lube.

Can alu should be similar thickness but a bit trickier to cut....

wilwil
Posts: 366
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:47 pm

by wilwil

Which spacer is it? I thought they were all the same thickness. Is it the one that slots into the larger cogs that are joined together?

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Calnago
Posts: 8549
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

It’s the spacer separating the smaller cluster of 3 cogs from the single cogs. It kind of “snaps” in to the cluster.
Image
It’s easy to identify from the rest...
Image
The 2.3mm (actually 2.26mm) is on the left vs the 2.2mm (actually 2.21mm) on the right. Like I said, it was a very small difference but enough to give the chain the clearance it needed.
With differences as small as they are, and the preciseness of today’s drive trains, it wouldn’t be worth it in my opinion to start cutting up beer cans just to save a few dollars in the grand scheme of things. It could end up making things worse than if you did doing nothing and just left the cracked spacer in there, creak and all.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Hellgate
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:49 pm

by Hellgate

I've broken a number of that spacer and finally had the cassette break. I think a nice Ti spacer is a better solution.

This cassette has about 7,500 miles on it over the past 2 years.

Ordered a new cassettes, torqued to 40nm...ImageImage

JoO
Posts: 181
Joined: Thu May 04, 2017 7:30 am

by JoO

Unfortunately I also broke 2.3 and 2.2 spacers in a chorus cassette. Dabbled around with a miche 10 speed spacer but in the end I ordered a new 2.3 spacer.
I paid eur 8.64 for 2 pcs. From bike-components.

bm0p700f
in the industry
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by bm0p700f

I have never broke a campag spacer. What are you all doing to them.

by Weenie


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