My quest to carry a spare tubular

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
johnrho
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 4:27 pm

by johnrho

So I’ve been meaning to post this for awhile but finally got a chance to sit down and write about my quest to carry a spare tub.

So here are the requirements:

1. Must to be same tub and size as on my wheels, currently Vittoria Corsa G+ 25mm
2. Carrying the spare tub in a jersey pocket is unacceptable
3. Must look as aesthetically pleasing as possible (i.e. can’t strap the spare tub under the seat)

So here’s what I’ve tried and what I deemed successful/unsuccessful lol:

1. Elite Byasi and Super Byasi storage bottles (FAIL)
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So my first (and second) attempt was to try putting a folded tub into these storage bottles and carry them like a water bottle. I first bought the Byasi which is the same size as a 550ml water bottle. The folding technique is the same as found here https://www.eleven.cc/fold-that-tub/. No matter how thin, small, thicker, short and long I folded the tub, I could not get the cap back on. So I gave up on the Byasi.

I then found out (through Elite’s website) that they had a Super Byasi that was the size of a 750ml water bottle. Again, no matter how thin, small, thicker, short and long I folded the tub, I still couldn’t get the cap back on. So the Super Byasi was a fail.

Costs:
Elite Byasi - $15.54CAD
Elite Super Byasi - $19.60CAD
Both bought on Amazon

2. Vittoria Zip Case - Bottle Cage Tool Bag (PASS)
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So my third attempt in carrying a spare tub was to use this tool bag that goes in a bottle cage. Again using the folding technique, I got the tub in the case and was able to zip it up completely. I will say that getting it into the bottle cage is a tight fit - I’m using ENVE bottle cages.

Cost:
Vittoria Bottle Cage Tool Bag - $10.99CAD
Bought from ProBikeKit

3. Speedsleev Ranger Plus (PASS)
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So I actually stumbled on this saddle bag while browsing through WW and thought I’d give it a try. I actually ordered the Ranger (in orange of course) and then got an email from Marc from Speedsleev - they ran out of the orange (luckily). I took the opportunity to ask him which bag he thought would fit a 25mm tub. He recommended the Ranger Plus and said even that would be tight. I took his recommendation and it got delivered 5 days later. Again using the folding technique, I pushed the folded tub in and it fit perfectly. The nice thing about the Ranger Plus is it not only holds the tub but it fits 2 CO2 canisters, Silca Eolo nozzle, Silca levers and my Silca carbon levers. From a aesthetics view, it actually looks and fits better than a normal saddle bag - it’s not bulky and is fits slim under my saddle (I use 130mm wide Selle Italia) like a torpedo.

All in all, this is the set up I use for long rides/grand fondos

Cost:
Speedsleev Ranger Plus - $29USD
Ordered directly from Speedsleev

Dishonourable Mentions:
5. Topeak Aero Wedge Pack with buckle (Medium)
6. BV Y-Series Strap-On (Small)

Ok yes the folded tub fits easily in #5/6 but honestly they look fugly on the bike. So I learned my lesson the hard way lol.

It’s worth mention that what I carry normally is my Silca Grande Americano that contains the following:

1. 2 CO2 canisters with Silca Eolo
2. Valve core remover
3. 2oz bottle of sealant (currently Bontrager TLR)
4. Spare valve core
5. Latex gloves
6. Silca Italian Knife - Tredici
7. Silca Tire Levers

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Regarding the 2oz bottle of sealant, I’m switching to the setup Calnago has of using a Tufo bottle with the Orange Seal injector tube and filled with Orange Seal (thanks Calnago for the info!).

So there you go, my quest in carrying a spare tub. I’m open to feedback (or criticism) or other suggestions. Enjoy Image



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by Weenie


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Stendhal
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2016 1:43 am
Location: Silicon Valley

by Stendhal

I have two Speedsleevs for my two bikes and really appreciate them, and the company. Good choice!
Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL6 (6.39 kg), Cervelo Aspero (7.87)
Retired: LOW// mki, Pinarello Dogma F10 \ F8, Lapierre Pulsium, TIME Fluidity, Wilier Cento1 SR, Ridley Noah, Cyfac Cadence, Cervelo S2, R3, R5, Felt Z25, Klein Quantum, Cannondale 2.0

alcatraz
Posts: 2202
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Because a roadside swapped tubular can't be considered safe to ride normally, I don't understand why you need to carry a normal 300gr tub. Why not look into riding something lighter like Veloflex Record or Tufo Elite 160gr which both should be much more compact.

Then when home you take it off and glue a good one on properly. If you stock like 2-3 tires you can send them away to be repaired all at once.

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nickf
Posts: 820
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:34 pm

by nickf

Carry a bottle of sealant and a cell phone. I ride tubs for not only the ride quality but for the systems low weight. Would be lighter to just run clinchers and carry a spare tube.

Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

When my tubs show up this week I'll carry this, a hand pump and my phone.

Unless you regularly trash tyres this should be all you need 99% of the time. Image

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Priit
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 9:22 am

by Priit

Sorry to say it, but you are doing it all wrong. If you want to carry a spare tubular on your bike (other options are in your pocket or classic - over shoulders, around the back) then the only civilized way to do it is to use old pedal leather strap and put it under the saddle, like this:

Image.

If you don’t have an old leather pedal strap, buy a new one. Definitely no bags, no tool bottles. :roll:

And here is a little nice article about the subject. Hope it helps.
Last edited by Priit on Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.

KCookie
Posts: 1493
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 9:40 am
Location: Pom living in Australia

by KCookie

I have a Tufo Elite 160 strapped under my saddle with double sided velcro which is obviously light. I agree, seems pointless carrying such a heavy spare, defeats the object of riding tubulars.
I definitely needed it last week after a blow out. No way orange seal was going to fix that.Image

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1415chris
Posts: 1280
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:59 am
Location: Surrey UK

by 1415chris

Did you ride through minefild?

My way, Speedsleev Ranger Small
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Elite 135g 22mm, two co2 cartridges with chuck, multitool and still spare space for small bits like chain link, valve core etc.
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dgasmd
Posts: 1744
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 5:10 am
Location: South Florida

by dgasmd

Having used just about every single method of folding a tubular and all methods of carrying it over the last 10+ years, here are my takes and what I have settled for:

1. Middle back pocket:
Preglued Tufo Elite, Super tight fold, and taped even tighter. Inside of a sunglasses bag. Tiny pump, 2 CO2 canisters, 2 levers, and a tiny Chuck with a rubber band around the sunglass bag.
Pro—>super compact and out of the way
Con—>takes the pocket I use for my phone/ID/emergency money. Can feel it pressing against my back some. Catches on jackets, especially when reaching back for stuff.
2. Bags/straps under saddle:
I have a fat ass, so regardless of the bag size, brand, strap and material, and how hard I try wedge it under the saddle it ends up ruining my bibs in the same spots from rubbing.
Pro—>none
Cons—>ruins bibs = Expensive FAIL!!!
3. Bottle cage options:
Have tried several of the plastic carriers like the OP. They all fail at holding things in and being able to put the lid without being warped and/or fitting on cages. The softer material ones are better, but they fail at being visually appealing. Cut up bidón with everything stuffed in has been my lightest and most commonly used methods as of recent.
Pro—>easy, accesible, lightest outside of the rear jersey pocket, and fits the most things. The most practical method by far
Con—>takes up a bottle cage = one less bottle (solved by using 1L bottles), and not the most PRO look at all!

**Note on carrying latex and regular spare:
-Liquid latex
I personally preload all tubulars when I glue/mount them. If it is going to seal the flat, that will do it and prevents me from carrying that container as little as it may be. Hating carrying things with low probability of use.
-Regular size tire
As pointed out above, I see no point in it. It will be a temporary solution until you glue a permanent tire, so why use a bigger and heavier tire harder to carry? Makes no sense to me, hence the smaller and lighter and easier to fold Tufo!

rgamble
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 12:34 am

by rgamble

The standard Elite Byasi works ok for me. It contains a 22mm Sprinter, two 12 gram Co2's an adapter, some allen keys, tire lever (to start removal) a $20, & some ID.

I'm fortunate to ride in an area where flats are not much of a problem however after a few weeks on a tire I'll put in Revo sealant.

The trick is to spirial wrap the tire around a once folded length containing the Co2's, Then sort of screw it in.
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tommasini
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Location: Central USA
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by tommasini

I go years between flats - so based on such odds I choose a spare that is ultra light for all the days I dont need it and yet has a reasonable chance of getting me home. Like others have suggested - go with light and small spares......I call them "space savers" like we see in the automotive industry. I use the Vittoria 21mm time trial tires. As i recall they are 170 grams and have a puncture resistive belt.

Oh - and where to put it - it fits in a jersey pocket very compactly along with a very small pump and a carbon stick I use (very rarely) to quickly roll under the tubbie to unseat it from the rim.

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dgasmd
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 5:10 am
Location: South Florida

by dgasmd

rgamble wrote:The standard Elite Byasi works ok for me. It contains a 22mm Sprinter, two 12 gram Co2's an adapter, some allen keys, tire lever (to start removal) a $20, & some ID.

I'm fortunate to ride in an area where flats are not much of a problem however after a few weeks on a tire I'll put in Revo sealant.

The trick is to spirial wrap the tire around a once folded length containing the Co2's, Then sort of screw it in.
I have done this too and 2 things happened:
1. The container was somewhat warped in shape and couldn’t screw in the cap. Or if I managed to I couldn’t slide it in the cage all the way down.
2. I almost lost 1-2 fingers trying to get it out, as I suspect would be the case from your 2nd pict.

rgamble
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 12:34 am

by rgamble

Yes, It's difficult to remove the tire but otherwise works ok. Maybe have 2 occasions a year to use it on the road.

On balance the convience it provides switching between bikes etc makes it a worthwhile solution.
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Etienne
Posts: 195
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 11:41 am
Location: France

by Etienne

Hi, I carry my spare tub under the saddle, tucked in an old sock and secured with a velcro strap, and have no bibs chafing since then ... this solution is stealth and cheap, but still very efficient.

The bottle cage solution is not even acceptable for me as I need at least 2 bottles for long rides ...

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dgasmd
Posts: 1744
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 5:10 am
Location: South Florida

by dgasmd

Etienne wrote: The bottle cage solution is not even acceptable for me as I need at least 2 bottles for long rides ...
Used to complain about the same until I found the 1 L bottles from Zefal. I did a little weighting and comparison, and turns out that carrying a full 1L single bottle was a good 50-65 grm savings compared to 2x500cc bottlesImageImage

by Weenie


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