When do you change the chain/general drivertrain use

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
froze
Posts: 124
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:47 am

by froze

You can easily check your chain wear, either buy a chain wear checker tool, or use a ruler, the tool is easier and a bit more accurate, Park sells them for $10, not sure about all the generic johnny come latelys as to how accurate they are, there isn't much too them at all so if a generic one is accurately made then get one of those, but $10 isn't a bad deal, I think Jenson USA has one for $5.

So once you figured out your chain wear your results will very on model of chain, how well you maintained your chain, and what kind of rider and environment you ride in, some folk only get 2,000 miles on a chain, I typically average 8,000 miles. Typically your gears will last 3 times longer than the chain, so on your 4th chain replacement you should replace your gears.

Side note; one poster mentioned he replaces tires on set standard of miles, that to me makes no sense since not all tires will wear the same and riding conditions could vary. So I replace when flats start to increase or if the tire is damaged of course, but typically I get between 2,500 to 4,000 miles on road tires and a lot more on touring tires to around 5,000 to 6,000. The one thing I found out is that the more expensive high end tires won't last nearly as long as good quality mid level tires.

Bar tape is another one of those buy when they worn out items; cleaning wise most can be cleaned very nicely with just 409.

by Weenie


tarmackev
Posts: 435
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:59 pm

by tarmackev

Lewn777 wrote:I just follow the boring regular maintenance intervals.
Cassette 10,000km, Chainrings 10,000km, chain 3000-4000kms. Tires 3000km-4000km, bar tape when disgusting. :oops:

Visual checks confirms that I'm about right.

I use 'pro bike garage' on my phone connected with Strava and follow the intervals. Stops me needing to think about it.

Pretty much the same as this for me.


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Calnago
Posts: 8198
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

I swap things around far too much to try to keep track of mileage on individual parts. Even still, there’s far too many variables to make mileage an accurate gauge of when to replace a chain. I pretty much use “feel” on the road and adhere to Campagnolo’s guideline of 132.60mm for chain replacement. At that point, I can start to notice a degradation in performance. If a new chain exhibits poor performance (like worse than the one I just took off), then I know it’s time for a cassette replacement too. I use some vernier calipers for fine measurements but I found that the solid Park Tool chain checker is my go to for a quick Go/No go check. If it is at 0.50% wear, that is just slightly beyond the 132.60 Campy guideline and it gets replaced for sure.
Image
Without swapping wheels/cassettes/cranks etc, I’ve found that I would get two chains per cassette. If I try to put a third new chain on the same cassette, shifting is poor. So it’s a 2:1 (chain/cassette) ratio for me. That works if you only have one bike/setup, but when you’re always changing and swapping things those sorts of guidelines don’t really work so well. Best to measure the chain and go by feel on the wear of cassettes and/or chain rings.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

talltales
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Mar 11, 2019 10:43 pm

by talltales

alcatraz wrote:
Thu May 16, 2019 5:50 am
I used to hot wax a chain regularly and so it seemed to last forever. I never got to 0.75% even after thousands of km. I did notice the rollers all had a loooot of play and that the chain was noisy as hell. I threw the chain out at around 0.3-0.4% stretch because of this.

So maybe take a look at the rollers and if they can wiggle around a lot. If you're within 0.75% and don't display such symptoms (or have excessive noise) just keep on riding.

Comparing mileage is quite pointless. Depends on your power/weight/riding style. One rider sees 1500km and the other 4000km. The 1500km chain can be in worse shape than the 4000km one.

Some chain wear indicators take roller play into the measurement but if you do it the old way by measuring distance between N amount of links then you don't measure roller play.
This!

I just replaced my chain (~4000 km) even if it was nowhere near 0.5% true elongation. But the individual rollers was very loose and it didnt "roll" or even shift well. Took it apart and sure enough, the hole in the rollers was notacably enlarged, besides all parts shoved obvious signs of wear. To me this means the 0.5-0.75% elongation rule is quite useless unless its clearly specified what is meant and how and what exactly to measure. My chain, masured on the pins was still in spec, but measured between the rollers it was toast.

talltales
Posts: 46
Joined: Mon Mar 11, 2019 10:43 pm

by talltales

Calnago wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 6:38 pm
I swap things around far too much to try to keep track of mileage on individual parts. Even still, there’s far too many variables to make mileage an accurate gauge of when to replace a chain. I pretty much use “feel” on the road and adhere to Campagnolo’s guideline of 132.60mm for chain replacement. At that point, I can start to notice a degradation in performance. If a new chain exhibits poor performance (like worse than the one I just took off), then I know it’s time for a cassette replacement too. I use some vernier calipers for fine measurements but I found that the solid Park Tool chain checker is my go to for a quick Go/No go check. If it is at 0.50% wear, that is just slightly beyond the 132.60 Campy guideline and it gets replaced for sure.
Image
Without swapping wheels/cassettes/cranks etc, I’ve found that I would get two chains per cassette. If I try to put a third new chain on the same cassette, shifting is poor. So it’s a 2:1 (chain/cassette) ratio for me. That works if you only have one bike/setup, but when you’re always changing and swapping things those sorts of guidelines don’t really work so well. Best to measure the chain and go by feel on the wear of cassettes and/or chain rings.
Can you please measure the lenght of your tool on the 0.5 (0.5 what? - % or mm) and the 0.75 side. Should be interesting to know what park considers "worn" or "not worn".

Can you please provide the measured roller diameter of a new campy roller? A new shimano hg54 is only 7.65mm. If all rollers are not equal diameter and internal clearence, it will interfere with gauges like the park one.

Come to think of it. 132.6mm seem overly conservative. (depending a bit on roller diameter and roller clearence) a new chain would measure about 132.2mm. That leaves only 0.3% before campy consideres it spent. Really?

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