Shimano 9070 DI2 - I now realise how good it was.

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
BdaGhisallo
Posts: 2311
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 1:38 pm

by BdaGhisallo

Ok - so I had another go at it this afternoon and the FD won't work if the cage is parallel to the outer chainring as the Shimano setup instructions detail. I did find that if I toe the FD cage out a touch, just beyond the parallel setting, it'll shift nicely and avoid any chain rub. Still not fully getting my head around this but it is what it is.

As for the 9100 rear brake caliper... f*ck me! I guess I could always brake only with the front!

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Calnago
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

If the front derailleur won’t work when it’s set up perfectly parallel then I shudder to think how it can work when it’s not. I once broke a weak Cannondale front derailleur tab when 9100 mechanical first came out and I used the support screw to try to align the thing better. Exactly as described in the instructions. Follow the instructions, but don’t throw common sense out the window. That was the first 9100 I installed and learned a lot (always do) on the first one. But I’ve always found that a perfectly parallel front derailleur cage with respect to the rings is one of the most important aspects of being able to dial everything in, regardless of whether it’s Campy or Shimano. So when you say it doesn’t work if the cage is parallel, what does that mean? It rubs. Or it doesn’t even move? Or what, exactly. Did you go through all the setup steps as if you were installing it from scratch?
Your chainstays arent supershort, and with standard (39/53) rings this should (theoretically), be a piece of cake install. The only unknown to me would seem to be mixing the 9000 SRM crank with the 9150 stuff.
Did you say what frame it was? Although I’d think the derailleur tab would have to be way off before the 9150 couldn’t be adjusted to accommodate it. Whereas with mechanical, depending on the cable exit point from the BB to the front derailleur arm, that could for sure affect things. Sure would be a good exercise at this point if you could get your hands on a current crank and swap it out as part of the process of ruling things out one by one.
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by Weenie


BdaGhisallo
Posts: 2311
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 1:38 pm

by BdaGhisallo

The 9100 FD cage isn't way out of parallel. I would say it's 0.5 to 1mm further out than parallel, at most. And I have a clamp on band for the FD so there's no braze on to worry about. I simply rotated it outward a smidgen. I have the dealer manual on my workbench when I am installing this stuff and follow it to the letter.

I may get a regular Shimano 9100 or 8000 crank and see how it sets up. I have been contemplating retiring the SRM since I don't pay too much attention to it these days and haven't really "trained" in a fair while.


Any brake insights?

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Calnago
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

0.5-1.0mm our of alignment is a chasm in my books. I’ve always got the derailleur exactly aligned and everything falls into place with the right setup.

Brakes: think I’ve given you as much insight as I could in the other thread. Would have to see it and play with it first hand to figure it you further. You don’t have a flimsy brake bridge and/or seatstays, do you? You’ve tried toeing in the pads precisely and evenly?... to maybe say as much as a millimeter of toe in. For me, at 200+lbs, toe-in of 0.75mm seems about ideal.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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bilwit
Posts: 1204
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 5:49 am
Location: Seattle, WA

by bilwit

toiyuet wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 3:20 am
I hate the noise by clicking 9150 shifters to change gear, just like some cheap mouse, 9070 is much quieter.
C36 wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 7:56 am
Well, the crispier feel of the buttons are supposed to be one of the key improvements over the 9070 shifters. I personally like it a lot more.
BdaGhisallo wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:54 am
I agree. No matter what RD and FD I end up running, the 9150 shifters will remain.
I go between 9150/9070 shifter bikes pretty regularly and I also prefer and can appreciate the more tactile-clickyness of 9150, especially in full gloves. The slight change in shape and different textured sleeve I can take-it-or-leave-it but the extra clicky feedback is nice, though not a complete game-changer for me. Kind of how I feel about 9100 as a whole though, dubiously slight marginal improvements at best (other than the new hydro shifters).

cunn1n9
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:24 am

by cunn1n9

I am using 9100 cranks with Shimano PM with 9070 derailleurs and it works exactly the same as it did with the 9000 cranks. I didn’t change a thing. I came to the conclusion that the new spacing was too small a difference to matter.

On my mechanical bike the same. It had 9000 on it and I initially just ran the 9100 crank. Worked fine with no changes.

The when I fully upgraded to 9100 I initially got shuddering with the braking. This was not the direct mount brakes but the “classic” design. I suspect I hadn’t angled the brakes (toed in) right as I fixed fairly easily but was annoying on first ride.


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cunn1n9
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:24 am

by cunn1n9

cunn1n9 wrote:I am using 9100 cranks with Shimano PM with 9070 derailleurs and it works exactly the same as it did with the 9000 cranks. I didn’t change a thing. I came to the conclusion that the new spacing was too small a difference to matter.

On my mechanical bike the same. It had 9000 on it and I initially just ran the 9100 crank. Worked fine with no changes.

The when I fully upgraded to 9100 I initially got shuddering with the braking. This was not the direct mount brakes but the “classic” design. I suspect I hadn’t angled the brakes (toed in) right as I fixed fairly easily but was annoying on first ride.


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Only issue I had was that rear wheel removal in my opinion is much harder. You feel like your forcing the wheel out whereas before it took no force. I prefer the feel of the 9000 for rear wheel removal as I feel with 9100 I could almost break the hanger when taking out the wheel.


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