When will you buy eTap AXS?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.

The question is when...?

Poll ended at Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:50 am

Right NOW!
8
3%
Soon, when I get a better deal.
10
3%
April, when Force eTap AXS would appear.
18
6%
Want it, but no plan.
46
16%
My current groupset is just fine.
198
69%
Never! Single Speed FTW!
7
2%
 
Total votes: 287

sandbox
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2018 9:30 pm

by sandbox

yinzerniner wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 5:42 pm
sandbox wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:11 pm
Whoa. Missed that possibility. Assume it’s further back in this thread?
See post here. Requires some sanding/shaving down of the ends of the crankset or the ends of the tabs on the chainrings, but doesn't look like it'll effect structural integrity either way.
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=152134&start=1170#p1481901

Pics stolen from OP:
Image
Image
Image

Also see here. This poster seems to imply it required no sanding/removal of carbon from crankarms:
viewtopic.php?t=152134&start=1080#p1471978

Maybe because the first post used GXP crankarms instead of the BB30/BB386 crankarms of the second post? Seems possible, as the thinner 24mm GXP spindle might need a bit thicker carbon arms than the 30mm BB30/BB386 spindle
THANKS!!!

by Weenie


gwerziou
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2019 7:25 pm
Location: Ballard, WA

by gwerziou

Calnago wrote:
Sat Aug 10, 2019 4:48 pm
Kjetil wrote:Blurb said chain/sprocket life. Fewer contact points so greater contact area to counter it.
IIRC.
Thanks, that’s exactly the only rationale that I could come up with in my mind as well, but was wondering what marketing spin SRAM was using to justify the new enlarged roller diameter. It’s no secret that when you get down to only 10 and 9 tooth cogs, that the actual chain engagement is so small that rapid wear is inevitable. You can just look back to the days of SunTour’s Microdrive to see that.
Your point is valid, but not in regards to SunTour - SunTour never went to 9 or 10 cogs. Microdrive was actually pretty cool, and in fact most drivetrains absorbed the Microdrive concept in later years before multiple chainrings went away. Where SunTour went wrong was the attempt to have the BEAST (Browning Electronic Accushift Transmission) front shifting system, which seems like it was some super complicated way of not having a front derailleur but having sections of front chainring shift. They poured all their R&D into it and it went nowhere and sank their boat. The current SunTour company is under different ownership entirely.

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Calnago
Posts: 8413
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Yes, while they never went to 9 or 10 cogs at the rear (thank god), the cluster was much tighter at the back, and was coupled up front with some really small chainrings (for the times) to compensate and provide the lower gearing necessary in the dirt. But they wore really quickly. I think they marketed it as being able to clear bigger stumps or something as well . Not sure chain guards etc were a thing back then. Didn’t even know there was a “current” Sun Tour company these days. Making bike components?
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

tutle2020
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:11 am

by tutle2020

Calnago wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:08 pm
Didn’t even know there was a “current” Sun Tour company these days. Making bike components?
I’m not sure if it’s the same company now but they’re doing alright in the MTB suspension scene, very strong lower tier presence but they also sponsor some World Cup teams.

XCProMD
Posts: 779
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2008 10:25 am
Location: Cantabria

by XCProMD

Nowadays SunTour is owned by Sakae Ringyo from Taiwan. The old SunTour was the commercial brand of Maeda Industries Ltd.

Their MicroDrove concept was also put in practice by Shimano and Sachs (and by the way by Campagnolo in their OR series), although Shimano never did a 20 T chainring or a MTB cluster with less than a 28 T large cog. We all used those kind of teeth counts until SRAM’s 2x took over, and wear wasn’t much of an issue. It was certainly not with SunTour’s MD.

Some claimed chain sucks were more frequent but I never experienced that.

By the way, SunTour was already doing bad before buying BEAST from Browning (it wasn’t their own development). Shimano was much a bigger company and learnt that it was easy to choke them in never ending patent litigation.


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Calnago
Posts: 8413
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Do you remember a pretty cool looking mountain bike, early 90’s vintage... Specialized Stumpjumper Comp I think. It was a matte grey and I lusted over that thing. It came built with the MD stuff which was the reason I didn’t get it since the shop guys were mentioning the relatively fast wear of the small rings in our muddy northwest trails, which made total sense intuitively (small rings, fewer teeth, faster wear. I ended up getting a different Stumpjumper on a closeout sale no doubt due to the ugly fuscia color which was described as Ruby Red, but somewhere a terrible mixup in paint must have occurred. Anyway, it had the more conventionally sized XT stuff on it and I thought I was man enough to look past the color for the price I was getting it for. Turns out I wasn’t. Hated that bike from the get go, and it had nothing to do with the bike itself, and everything to do with the color. Sold it to a girl. First and only mountain bike I’ve ever owned. Been tempted since but just prefer the road stuff.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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pdlpsher1
Posts: 2419
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

When I replace my front chainrings the large ring is always the one to show signs of wear before the small ring. The inner rings look ok despite the fact that I climb a lot. I don’t know if chainring wear on a road AXS is really an issue. With that said the disposable PM is truly a dumb idea. If the integrated PM really doesn’t cost SRAM a lot to make then they should just price the chainrings the same as the previous generation Red chainrings. Charging a lot of money for a wear item doesn’t make sense. No current Quarq users are asking for a more accurate PM. So Sram effectively claimed they solved a problem that never existed. It looks like they are setting a financial trap for the unaware.

Sram has sold a lot of OEM AXS bikes due to their aggressive OEM pricing. But the owners of AXS will have to pay up later when it’s time to replace the $300 chainrings and $350 cassettes.


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zinedrei
Posts: 122
Joined: Wed Oct 11, 2017 7:36 am

by zinedrei

are there any compatible chainrings now from other brands?

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Alexbn921
Posts: 203
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:39 pm

by Alexbn921

zinedrei wrote:
Sun Aug 18, 2019 1:09 pm
are there any compatible chainrings now from other brands?
Nope

XCProMD
Posts: 779
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2008 10:25 am
Location: Cantabria

by XCProMD

Calnago wrote:Do you remember a pretty cool looking mountain bike, early 90’s vintage... Specialized Stumpjumper Comp I think. It was a matte grey and I lusted over that thing. It came built with the MD stuff which was the reason I didn’t get it since the shop guys were mentioning the relatively fast wear of the small rings in our muddy northwest trails, which made total sense intuitively (small rings, fewer teeth, faster wear. I ended up getting a different Stumpjumper on a closeout sale no doubt due to the ugly fuscia color which was described as Ruby Red, but somewhere a terrible mixup in paint must have occurred. Anyway, it had the more conventionally sized XT stuff on it and I thought I was man enough to look past the color for the price I was getting it for. Turns out I wasn’t. Hated that bike from the get go, and it had nothing to do with the bike itself, and everything to do with the color. Sold it to a girl. First and only mountain bike I’ve ever owned. Been tempted since but just prefer the road stuff.
Really bad piece of advice. If you liked the frame, the MD, especially the XC-Pro and XC-Comp were the freaking shit. And not just with thumb shifters. The 1992 X-Press were really good (still 7s) and the 1994 ErgoTec thing was great.


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Calnago
Posts: 8413
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Oh well, different time different place. One of those if we only knew then what we know now kind of things. It was a long time ago and perhaps I was more apt to think guys in bike shops knew what they were talking about .
[edit]: not to slight all “bike shop guys” but my head shakes more often than it should these days when I see some of the stuff that gets out the door from supposedly “pro level” shops.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

aeroisnteverything
Posts: 176
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:43 pm

by aeroisnteverything

pdlpsher1 wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:35 pm

Sram has sold a lot of OEM AXS bikes due to their aggressive OEM pricing. But the owners of AXS will have to pay up later when it’s time to replace the $300 chainrings and $350 cassettes.
Those cassette prices... gulp. :shock:

So I am just curious what everyone here thinks of the above. Is buying a bike with SRAM AXS basically a mistake? Or, for those that did buy it - are you guys blown away and/or impressed by features and advantages of the 12sp system that "you did not know you were missing"?

Really curious to have some perspectives. Because obvously many, many top end models are pushing this thing onto the buyer, but I am currently firmly in the "buy Shimano" camp.

mattr
Posts: 4664
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Buy, use for a year, sell on before you need to do any major work, buy the next shiny new thing.

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Alexbn921
Posts: 203
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2019 6:39 pm

by Alexbn921

Force cassettes, chain and rings are half the price. I went with force for the better power solution and the cheaper running costs.
I have 480% gear range and I use it all, so 12 speed was an easy choice.

flick10
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Aug 06, 2019 3:42 pm

by flick10

I have just built an F10 disc with full red axs etap group - makes the di2 / campag equivalent set up and install look stone age

Operation is flawless, set up is uncomplicated and gearing range is brilliant, brake calipers and discs operate brilliantly

Being able to check battery charge , set up gear change options etc from my phone is great

Hi time campag and shimano went blue tooth

Cheers Flick10

PS I don't work for sram!

by Weenie


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