Grippy Tubeless Road Tire

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Herb5998
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by Herb5998

Panaracer Evo tubeless, lots of grip, fast rolling

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Yes the rbcc tyres are slower than the pro ones or the gp5000tl tyres but the wet grip and cut resistance is far better. They wear at a slow rate too which helps. They are expensive but so are the conti's.

In order of wet grip
IRC Rbcc
Hutchinson fusion 5/Mavic yskion UST
Cont gp5000tl
Schwalbe pro one. It not grippy in the wet at all.

In term of puncture resistance the conti and Hutchinson would swap places.

The expensive tyres are expensive for a reason.

In terms of longevity the conti and Hutchinson would swap places.

My current favourites are the IRC tyres and the conti's. The conti are faster but in the wet don't feel as good as the IRC's and have picked more damage too but that could be down to bad luck.

by Weenie


jih
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by jih

NickJHP wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:34 am
A bit outside your size requirements, but I just returned from a week of cycling in the Victorian Alps on an Open U.P.P.E.R. shod with Compass Bon Jon Pass 700x35 Extralight setup as tubeless, and I've never ridden another tyre that sticks so well when cornering. I reckon on those I can both descend faster and feel safer than on any other tyre I've ridden here in the ~30 years that I've been riding these mountains. I finished the week by riding our annual alpine brevet ride - 200km with about 4000m of climbing. This is a ride I've completed over 20 times previously, and I was considerably faster on the descents this year without feeling that I was getting anywhere near the point of losing grip. The first half of the ride it rained, and on the wet winding descents I overtook dozens and dozens of riders trying to keep their narrow racing tyres rubber side down. Even in the dry later on I still had a substantial advantage on the descents over riders on narrow tyres, and was still overtaking most of them. I can only recall two riders in the entire 200km passing me on a descent, and that was on a fairly straight section where my 65kg couldn't compete with the heavier riders.
When someone writes that a tryre feels like it has good cornering grip, I always wonder how they know that, since it isn't something you can feel until the grip is lost. Could you explain what brought you to the conclusion that these tyres had more cornering grip than most?

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

jih wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:18 pm

When someone writes that a tryre feels like it has good cornering grip, I always wonder how they know that, since it isn't something you can feel until the grip is lost. Could you explain what brought you to the conclusion that these tyres had more cornering grip than most?

There is a very thin gray line between losing grip completely and having grip. It's hard to explain, but you can feel it and you can hear the transition. It's like a slight push to the outside accompanied by the expected rolling tire sound fading in volume. And then of course sometimes you lose the rear for a moment, but recover.

ryanw
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by ryanw

Panarace GK's (not the SK guise) are awesome but more of a gravel tyre some would say.

I had the 38s tubless on my CX bike for commuting. Ran around 45PSI (I'm 85kg), and they were exceptional.

An absolute arse to fit though!
'16 Cervelo S5 - 6,650g RIP
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Marin
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by Marin

jih wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:18 pm
When someone writes that a tryre feels like it has good cornering grip, I always wonder how they know that, since it isn't something you can feel until the grip is lost.
Agree. This is something that's extremely hard to test, feel or judge. I've had tires slip on steep climbs out of the saddle when wet, but I didn't ride the same road with several different tires at the same time...

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Miller
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by Miller

ryanw wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:15 pm
Panarace GK's (not the SK guise) are awesome but more of a gravel tyre some would say.
I had the 38s tubless on my CX bike for commuting. Ran around 45PSI (I'm 85kg), and they were exceptional.
An absolute arse to fit though!
I fitted a pair of GKs recently, 38mm with green file tread, and actually yes they were an arse to fit. Once fitted they rolled beautifully and I liked them a lot but on a day of damp roads, twice the rear wheel slipped out on a bend on a way I really wasn't expecting. Caught grip again both times but it was worrying. Not sure what to do with those tyres now.

Maybe the coloured tread lacks grip.

ryanw
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by ryanw

Mine were the standard black tread with tan walls. Never had an issue in the wet, ice, snow from a year of commuting in the UK.

I miss their comfort levels and will probably go back to them after my Hutch's die on me.
'16 Cervelo S5 - 6,650g RIP
'17 Focus Mares Force 1 - 7,170g
'19 Cervelo S5 Disc - 7,460g

IG: RhinosWorkshop - Check it out for all my custom builds :thumbup:

:!: Ride Southern Spain Cycling Holidays *£445 for 7 Nights* :!:

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FIJIGabe
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by FIJIGabe

ryanw wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:15 pm
An absolute arse to fit though!
Good to know I'm not the only one who had a problem fitting these! I ended up taking it to my LBS, who was gracious enough to seat them for me. Try as I might with my Bontrager Supercharger and CO2, there was no way to get these seated!
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NickJHP
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by NickJHP

jih wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:18 pm
When someone writes that a tryre feels like it has good cornering grip, I always wonder how they know that, since it isn't something you can feel until the grip is lost. Could you explain what brought you to the conclusion that these tyres had more cornering grip than most?
Because I've been spending a week every January for the past ~35 years riding these same mountains, and with modern GPS I can compare my times over particular segments. For example, on one particular segment of descent on Mt Hotham which is a continual series of sweeping bends for 4.8km, my time this year was 6:06, and for the previous three years the same segment took 6:30, 6:28, and 6:31.

Marin
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by Marin

NickJHP wrote:
Wed Jan 30, 2019 7:58 am
Because I've been spending a week every January for the past ~35 years riding these same mountains, and with modern GPS I can compare my times over particular segments. For example, on one particular segment of descent on Mt Hotham which is a continual series of sweeping bends for 4.8km, my time this year was 6:06, and for the previous three years the same segment took 6:30, 6:28, and 6:31.
This tells us that you had more confidence in the tires, but not that you had more grip in my opinion.

jih
Posts: 247
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:54 pm

by jih

NickJHP wrote:
Wed Jan 30, 2019 7:58 am
jih wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:18 pm
When someone writes that a tryre feels like it has good cornering grip, I always wonder how they know that, since it isn't something you can feel until the grip is lost. Could you explain what brought you to the conclusion that these tyres had more cornering grip than most?
Because I've been spending a week every January for the past ~35 years riding these same mountains, and with modern GPS I can compare my times over particular segments. For example, on one particular segment of descent on Mt Hotham which is a continual series of sweeping bends for 4.8km, my time this year was 6:06, and for the previous three years the same segment took 6:30, 6:28, and 6:31.
I'm not quite following the logic here. Unless the slower times were slower because of picking yourself up after a fall, and then riding timidly, how do you know that the quicker times were because you would have slipped and fell on the other tyres?

MikeD
Posts: 224
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2014 9:55 pm

by MikeD

jih wrote:
NickJHP wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:34 am
A bit outside your size requirements, but I just returned from a week of cycling in the Victorian Alps on an Open U.P.P.E.R. shod with Compass Bon Jon Pass 700x35 Extralight setup as tubeless, and I've never ridden another tyre that sticks so well when cornering. I reckon on those I can both descend faster and feel safer than on any other tyre I've ridden here in the ~30 years that I've been riding these mountains. I finished the week by riding our annual alpine brevet ride - 200km with about 4000m of climbing. This is a ride I've completed over 20 times previously, and I was considerably faster on the descents this year without feeling that I was getting anywhere near the point of losing grip. The first half of the ride it rained, and on the wet winding descents I overtook dozens and dozens of riders trying to keep their narrow racing tyres rubber side down. Even in the dry later on I still had a substantial advantage on the descents over riders on narrow tyres, and was still overtaking most of them. I can only recall two riders in the entire 200km passing me on a descent, and that was on a fairly straight section where my 65kg couldn't compete with the heavier riders.
When someone writes that a tryre feels like it has good cornering grip, I always wonder how they know that, since it isn't something you can feel until the grip is lost. Could you explain what brought you to the conclusion that these tyres had more cornering grip than most?
I agree. The only time I've felt a difference in grip was riding an old worn Gatorskin up a climb and could make the rear tire slip when climbing out of the saddle. Even then it could have been the road surface.

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pdlpsher1
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by pdlpsher1

Perhaps one way to test tire grip is to hold two wheels, one in each hand, and apply roughly equal amount of force pushing each wheel against a solid surface like a garage driveway, to see if one tire has more grip than the other. Not too scientific but I bet this test will reveal even a small difference between two tires.

by Weenie


nachetetm
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Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:54 pm

by nachetetm

I think i can't test scientifically what tire is more grippy (will involve me falling, and I am not planning to), but I can definitely tell. Call it "confidence" instead of "grip" if you prefer.

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