Specialized Recall

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

"If you own a Specialized bike with a Future Shock, listen up. Specialized just announced a voluntary safety recall which affects the Roubaix, Ruby, Diverge & Sirrus, and includes bikes from the 2017 to 2019 model years. Apparently, the steerer tube collar on some of these bikes may crack as a result of “stress corrosion”. Due to the unique design of the Future Shock, cracks in the steerer collar may result in loss of steering control while riding."
https://bikerumor.com/2019/01/09/specia ... ge-sirrus/

Why am I not surprised. Looking at the photos - what a goofy thing. So much complication and risk to create a feature of questionable value. No good will ever come from messing with anything related to the steering column on a bicycle unless it is to make it stronger and more simple. It makes me wonder if the engineers who come up with this stuff ride bikes. Is there anyone here who would want that contraption on their bike while descending north of 80 km/h on an alpine pass with less then perfect surface, dips, humps, cattle grates to jump, etc? You couldn't pay me enough to do it.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

by Weenie


TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Uneven surfaces while cornering/descending is where suspension actually matters...it reduces high energy deflection/bounce at the tire and increases grip. GP motos have suspension even though they live on smooth race tracks.

Also the bike industry has been messing with steerers forever...HeadShok, IsoSpeed to name two of the more recent implementations. It's unfortunate that Specialized's FutureShock had to be recalled, but it also means they've fixed the issue.

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:54 pm
Uneven surfaces while cornering/descending is where suspension actually matters...it reduces high energy deflection/bounce at the tire and increases grip. GP motos have suspension even though they live on smooth race tracks.
Right, and suspension forks as found on MTB and motorcycles are fantastic for the purpose. And I've got no qualms about suspension elements in the rear of a bike frame. But asking the headtube/steerer to perform suspension duties as well as steering duties? That is asking an awful lot of a very light weight (or what should be a light weight) piece of gear.
TobinHatesYou wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:54 pm
It's unfortunate that Specialized's FutureShock had to be recalled, but it also means they've fixed the issue.
But I thought they fixed it after Terpstra crashed due to a future shock breaking and his bars coming off?

I can't speak for anyone else but when the descending gets intense, I use my arms and legs for suspension.
Last edited by Mr.Gib on Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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wheelsONfire
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by wheelsONfire

Yes, if you ride gravel with a really bad surface. My lower headset bearing cracked when i rode my UP on the stiff fork.
So with Lauf Grit it was for sure better.
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Ax Lightness Vial EVO Race (2018.12.21)
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=156137
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Ex bike; Vial EVO D

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

wheelsONfire wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:17 am
Yes, if you ride gravel with a really bad surface. My lower headset bearing cracked when i rode my UP on the stiff fork.
So with Lauf Grit it was for sure better.
That Lauf Grit fork is a safer bet than a steering column contraption. (If you can get past the looks and weight).
There is going to be much more of this stuff as we take what essentially are road bikes onto what was previously exclusively MTB terrain.

Gravel bikes will have to be built to handle the job. My skepticism is more focused on the questionable efforts at front end suspension for road bikes.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Terpstra’s bike did not have a real FutureShock installed, and this recall has nothing to do with the catastrophic failure on that bike.

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wheelsONfire
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by wheelsONfire

There are traits of Grit that isn't the best. Weight is one. A stiff fork is more nimble than Grit to.
The bike feel faster. But there are several things that is crap riding gravel/ mtb with a stiff fork (once you've used something like Grit).
For road bikes, puh, that's a tough one. Perhaps it's better keeping to fatter tires and be done with it!?
Luckily i have not seen any need for something plusher than Veloflex Carbon. Just now i have glued some of the new Vittoria 25mms on one my wheelsets.
I'm curious on how that feels once the season is on again :D
Last edited by wheelsONfire on Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
Bikes:

Ax Lightness Vial EVO Race (2018.12.21)
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=156137
Paduano Racing Fidia (kind of shelved)
Open *UP* (2016.04.14)


Ex bike; Vial EVO D

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Calnago
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by Calnago

I’m with ya Mr. Gib. But just to clarify a bit about the Terpstra incident, he was never actually on a future shock with suspension when it broke. He obviously hated the whole thing from the get go, but how could Specialized let him be seen not riding their latest and greatest gimmick, especially at Paris Roubaix. So instead, they came up with some rigid tube, then covered it with the rubber shroud to make it look like he was using the Future Shock. Unfortunately, it broke, and was caught on camera. D’oh... hate when then happens. Then Specialized went into immediate spin mode. Long live simplicity and elegance in design.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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wheelsONfire
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by wheelsONfire

Haha, simplicity!
That's funny, now that we have powermeters, electronic drivetrain and more for sure coming.
Bikes:

Ax Lightness Vial EVO Race (2018.12.21)
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=156137
Paduano Racing Fidia (kind of shelved)
Open *UP* (2016.04.14)


Ex bike; Vial EVO D

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Calnago
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by Calnago

I know right, but I can dream.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

1swiftvelo
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by 1swiftvelo

The recall is about the clamp. There was poor anodizeing issue along with people who neglected there bikes corrosion became an issue there . I have a future shox on diverge, it’s great, serves a purpose and works. I’ve done Levi Grand Fondo and many mountain trips with descents in the 80km/h range, not a wiggle. I’ve ridden the Lauf as well, with the leaf spring design you can get a wobble at high speeds. Sure it not pretty but are neither are half bikes on the market

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:32 am
Terpstra’s bike did not have a real FutureShock installed...
Yeah, that's what Specialized said :wink: . If fact they said a mechanic left a "part" in the bike that was only a prototype or something like that. My point is only that a complex work of engineering simply contains more oportunities for something to go wrong. Like the wrong part being installed, some other part corroding, etc. What's next?
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Mr.Gib wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 5:36 am
TobinHatesYou wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:32 am
Terpstra’s bike did not have a real FutureShock installed...
Yeah, that's what Specialized said :wink: . If fact they said a mechanic left a "part" in the bike that was only a prototype or something like that. My point is only that a complex work of engineering simply contains more oportunities for something to go wrong. Like the wrong part being installed, some other part corroding, etc. What's next?

Terpstra has been very, very picky about his equipment in the past and I see no reason for your paranoia. We haven't heard of any other steerers snapping in half in all this time...not in the pros or the consumer world. The recall is for an alloy collar that corrodes and potentially fails...it is attached to the traditional part of the steerer, under the FutureShock unit and cartridge.

Face it, bicycles are both complex and a compromise between strength and weight. You are literally sitting on alloy/steel/ti tubes with walls as thin as cardboard...or even thinner CFRP composite. MTB riders throw their bikes off cliffs with all this technology and they seem to come away unscathed most of the time.

Mr.Gib
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Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 6:32 am
Terpstra has been very, very picky about his equipment in the past and I see no reason for your paranoia. We haven't heard of any other steerers snapping in half in all this time...not in the pros or the consumer world. The recall is for an alloy collar that corrodes and potentially fails...it is attached to the traditional part of the steerer, under the FutureShock unit and cartridge.
Not paranoia, rather skepticism, and I appreciate that you don't see the reason for it. I started in this game in 1979 and have seen too many innovations that didn't work out in the bike industry. As a result, I have developed a conservative approach to my equipment choices. You might be more willing to adopt an innovation. (See the work of Everett Rogers for a more complete explanation of this).

The bike industry tends to behave very "small time" and the history has been that manufacturers seem able to bring some really dodgy stuff to market. It will take a lot of time and proof for people like me to accept riding a bike equipped with a FutureShock or similar. Right now I just have trouble with the idea that my handlebar would be attached to the bike with one of these if I were to ride a bike so equipped:
Image
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

by Weenie


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kgt
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by kgt

+1
When a company needs to come up with a technological 'innovation' every year or so in order to be competitive those are the results.

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