Sram eTap levers with Sram Red Aerolink or DuraAce brakes

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Lewn777
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by Lewn777

Jugi wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:45 pm
Shimano and SRAM have differing cable pull ratios in their brakes, therefore mixing manufacturers should be avoided.
If mixing and matching SRAM and Shimano didn't work then how on earth would aftermarket brake calipers like ee work well with both manufacturer's levers? You really need to engage your brain before uttering such misleading nonsense. :smartass: If you think that mismatched groupsets look ugly, that's fine, and you're entitled to that opinion, but to suggest that they don't work is plain wrong.

Thousands of people including me use Shimano calipers with SRAM groupsets becuase they prefer SRAM shifting and lighter weight but recognise Shimano make better, stronger less hassle brake calipers.

Cable pull ratio is only for not mixing MTB V-brakes and road brake levers or gear shifting.

To the OP: Yes use Dura-Ace calipers with SRAM levers on the whole work very well together but be careful with unusually wide rims as that can potentially cause problems and check that you're happy with the feel of the brakes. Some people really like an early brake bite, others like a very long modulation with a bite close to the end of the lever travel. There is only a certain amount that can be dialled in or out with setup so make sure you're happy with things before you spend money if possible, but this goes for other aftermarket brakes calipers like ee.

by Weenie


elSid
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by elSid

It’s not misleading nonsense. The combination suggested by the OP may “work,” but the not as well as a native system. Depends on set-up skill, braking technique, and probably most importantly, braking demand. A 130 pound rider on flat roads doesn’t tax the brakes as much as a clydesdale riding in the mountains.

https://www.velonews.com/2016/02/bikes- ... 512_394512
(not the definitive answer, but more on what to expect)

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Lewn777 wrote:
Jugi wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:45 pm
Shimano and SRAM have differing cable pull ratios in their brakes, therefore mixing manufacturers should be avoided.
...
Cable pull ratio is only for not mixing MTB V-brakes and road brake levers or gear shifting.
There are absolutely different pull rates and leverages and thus ratios between brakes and brake levers of the different groups. And throw in the wide range of rim widths being used today and it’s really hit and miss whether some combination of the three will work, work well, or not work worth a crap.
I’m not speaking of EE brakes here, but for example... Bontrager’s Speedstop Pros, as industrial looking as they are (much like EE’s) have an adjustment at the caliper that allows you to vary the leverage of the caliper, and in so doing change the pull ratio to accommodate the different brake levers that might be used with these brakes. It also simply allows one to fine tune them for personal preference in feel.
Another example is that I use the newer Shimano calipers with Campy levers on my rain bike with ~20mm rims. It works, probably not as well as if I had matching levers/calipers from either manufacturer, but the clearance I needed for fenders precluded the use of the Campy calipers. However, if you try to couple that same combination (Campy levers/ new Shimano calipers) on a bike with wider rims (24mm Boras for example), it’s really unacceptable.
Last edited by Calnago on Sat Dec 29, 2018 6:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Jugi
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by Jugi

Lewn777 wrote: If mixing and matching SRAM and Shimano didn't work then how on earth would aftermarket brake calipers like ee work well with both manufacturer's levers? You really need to engage your brain before uttering such misleading nonsense. :smartass: If you think that mismatched groupsets look ugly, that's fine, and you're entitled to that opinion, but to suggest that they don't work is plain wrong.
I believe I did not suggest they wouldn't work. A mechanical brake lever's job is to pull a brake cable, a cable's job is to actuate a brake caliper and a caliper's job is to squeeze a braking surface. That combination will result in a working braking system. I did suggest the system's performance will not be optimal (not what the manufacturers intended) if the components are not designed to work together.

Sir, your video lesson in bicycle mechanics for today:



Like Calnago mentioned, differing rim widths, brake pad materials etc. have a role to play as well. I wouldn't go as far as depicting any combination as "unsafe" like the guy refers to Shimano's current generation levers and SRAM's calipers, but I'm quite sure it's not best practice to mix component manufacturers in a braking system.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Well, I never mentioned “pad material” at all, as while pad material can play a big part in the quality of braking it is irrelevant to what’s being discussed here.
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Tracerboy
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by Tracerboy

Thanks people for all comments and answers, really helpfull.
Maybe i will give a chance to DA brakes with eTap levers, wheels are ZIPP 454 NSW
All this because my new frame is almost white LOOK 795 Blade rs and those black brakes just looks better in that frame,
EE brakes are not an option because of price, money goes to the frame, DA brakes are just half of the price if compared to EE.

fuel2000
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by fuel2000

I used my etap levers with the new dura ace brakes no problem at all. Canyon used to sell there sram equipped aeroads with duraace. If it’s good enough for a big manufacturer then it’s good enough for me.

Ritxis
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by Ritxis

fuel2000 wrote:
Sat Dec 29, 2018 3:29 pm
I used my etap levers with the new dura ace brakes no problem at all. Canyon used to sell there sram equipped aeroads with duraace. If it’s good enough for a big manufacturer then it’s good enough for me.
Jugi wrote:
Sat Dec 29, 2018 11:23 am
Lewn777 wrote: If mixing and matching SRAM and Shimano didn't work then how on earth would aftermarket brake calipers like ee work well with both manufacturer's levers? You really need to engage your brain before uttering such misleading nonsense. :smartass: If you think that mismatched groupsets look ugly, that's fine, and you're entitled to that opinion, but to suggest that they don't work is plain wrong.
I believe I did not suggest they wouldn't work. A mechanical brake lever's job is to pull a brake cable, a cable's job is to actuate a brake caliper and a caliper's job is to squeeze a braking surface. That combination will result in a working braking system. I did suggest the system's performance will not be optimal (not what the manufacturers intended) if the components are not designed to work together.

Sir, your video lesson in bicycle mechanics for today:



Like Calnago mentioned, differing rim widths, brake pad materials etc. have a role to play as well. I wouldn't go as far as depicting any combination as "unsafe" like the guy refers to Shimano's current generation levers and SRAM's calipers, but I'm quite sure it's not best practice to mix component manufacturers in a braking system.

The Movistar and the Katusha teams with Canyon, hey used Shimano direct mount brakes with Campagnolo and Sram levers.....problems? unknown, surely none........and many users of Sram eTap wear Shimano brakes and are more than happy

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

I'll add one additional data point to this discussion. Each summer I spend a few weeks in the mountains, and I am absolutely obsessive about braking. My travel bike is Sram Red equipped and through trial and error I have found that with the Sram levers, Ultegra 6700 calipers produce the best braking. Crazy strong early bite but still with good modulation. When pads and rims are new, even on the most extreme steeps and switchbacks, I have true one finger braking - hand effort is that low. I did experiment with the next generation - Ultegra 6800 which would more resemble current Dura Ace as far as pull ratio goes, and it just seemed to be a less powerful combination. As an added bonus the 6700 calipers have massive tire clearance. They can easily handle 32mm tires provided the frame is so designed. As well they work on very wide rims 25mm+. Shame they are not a bit lighter.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

Jugi
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by Jugi


Ritxis wrote: The Movistar and the Katusha teams with Canyon, hey used Shimano direct mount brakes with Campagnolo and Sram levers.....problems? unknown, surely none.......
They have done so because the Dura-Ace caliper has been the best available option (and affordable in a pro team's point of view). It would be interesting to get a pro team mechanic's opinion on that. The necessity for Canyon to equip their retail bikes with the same components has most likely stemmed from pro team's sponsor deal.

I feel like it's a similar situation for pro teams who use aero bikes with chainstay mounted rear brake calipers. Most likely the riders would like something with better performance and the mechanics would like something easier to adjust, but that's how the bike is built. That's your tool, go race it. It maybe less than optimal, but it works and doesn't prevent a rider from winning.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

I agree with @Jugi here. A lot of things might "work". The question is does it work as well as it could/should. My campy levered, shimano calipered rain bike with narrow 20mm rims seems to work just fine. Would it work better if I had the matching campy calipers... yes, no question. But I needed the added clearance for fenders that the Shimano calipers afforded, so it was a compromise that works. And I liked the new 9100 calipers so much from an aesthetic standpoint that I tried them on my Koppenberg with the Campy levers and 24mm (outside width) rims, and the result was not something that was acceptable to me, so back to the Campy/Campy combo. The thing is, it doesn't take much to improve upon the SRAM calipers. I've never heard of anyone running Campy/Campy saying "Sheesh, you should try the Campy levers with the SRAM calipers. Or Shimano/Shimano users... same thing. Either camp seems more than happy with their braking. Then, there is SRAM.
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Ritxis
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by Ritxis

Jugi wrote:
Sat Dec 29, 2018 7:19 pm
Ritxis wrote: The Movistar and the Katusha teams with Canyon, hey used Shimano direct mount brakes with Campagnolo and Sram levers.....problems? unknown, surely none.......
They have done so because the Dura-Ace caliper has been the best available option (and affordable in a pro team's point of view). It would be interesting to get a pro team mechanic's opinion on that. The necessity for Canyon to equip their retail bikes with the same components has most likely stemmed from pro team's sponsor deal.

I feel like it's a similar situation for pro teams who use aero bikes with chainstay mounted rear brake calipers. Most likely the riders would like something with better performance and the mechanics would like something easier to adjust, but that's how the bike is built. That's your tool, go race it. It maybe less than optimal, but it works and doesn't prevent a rider from winning.
It was not the best option available......................It was the only option.........and Sram and Campagnolo did not have direct mount brakes........they could also have used TRP's.............but they chose something they already knew would work

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