Stem spacers - how to clean cockpit?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
reedplayer
Posts: 536
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:10 am

by reedplayer

AJS914 wrote:
Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:49 pm
I love that red Argone. It's just a fatter spacer and I don't buy their 5-11% stiffer marketing. It reminds me of the Deda spacers posted above.
Hello,
at first i although thought, its "just a fatter spacer", but then i realized, that its not that simple. its based on a clever construction/idea.
this video declares the system:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__PwHYtDtw0

by Weenie


AJS914
Posts: 3608
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

Interesting the way it screws in place. That's pretty cool. Ok, it probably is stiffer.

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themidge
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Location: underneath sweet Scottish rain

by themidge

The pros use shallower, compact bars these days (by and large). I'd wager the position of the drops on pro bikes has stayed about the same over the years. They at least haven't got as much lower as the hoods* and the tops have. It's also interesting to look at the TT positions of riders from yesteryear, they are about the same as modern riders doing the 'Cancellara', but their hands are on the drops instead of the hoods.

*the hoods on older bikes tend to be a bit lower too, but that depends on the style of bar, not the depth of the drop.

RocketRacing
Posts: 941
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 2:43 am

by RocketRacing

Interesting. Makes sense. My felt f series is pretty old school racing geometry with a very low front. The updated FR saw effective stack go up near 2cm.

Connor
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 6:47 pm

by Connor

You could try spending the time you spent asking about spacers on stretching and core excercises?

Bigger Gear
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Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 6:58 pm
Location: Wet coast, Canada

by Bigger Gear

AJS914 wrote:
Tue Oct 30, 2018 8:22 pm
I think most Pros have downsized by at least one frame size if not two. They are running a deeper drop than the old days. To get that deeper drop they need less stack which means a smaller frame. The smaller frame comes with less reach so they make it up with a longer stem hence the propensity to see 13, 14, and the occasional 15cm stem in the peloton.
For sure many end up on ridiculously small frames. Ryder Hesjedal was on a 56cm Cervelo or Cannondale and he is quite tall at 1.90m. He used a long -17 stem, I guess he had some good flexibility too but his bike ended up looking really awful. Also Phillipe Gilbert on BMC rode a 50cm (!) frame, at 1.79m according to Procyclingstats. Interestingly when Gilbert went to Quickstep and got on a Specialized his fit was changed quite a bit. His bar position came up and he was riding a bigger frame overall. He was in a much more conservative position on the hoods than before. And his results improved.

Rudi
Posts: 225
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:43 pm

by Rudi

Should the question be what set up is lighter? I know the original question was about looks, but would a small headset cover with more spacers above be lighter that a tall cover with less spacers? I have this dilemma myself at the moment.

I'm assuming that spacers are lighter than headset cover material. I will weigh up my options, in the literal sense :-)
Cervelo R3 - 5.4kg viewtopic.php?f=10&t=142420

hannawald
Posts: 594
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:28 pm
Location: Czech Republic

by hannawald

Spacers are lighter. Conical headset spacer is not very light, maybe stiffer, there is more material. It may give something like 10 to 20g i believe. If you want absolutely lightest, Extralite has new 3d printed spacers called Ultraspacer, sold on r2bike.

jih
Posts: 264
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:54 pm

by jih

Style aside, the lightest way to get a given position is to cut the steerer short, no spacers, and an upturned stem. May not like this style but it is the lightest way to get this position.

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themidge
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Location: underneath sweet Scottish rain

by themidge

^ +1, it's probably stiffer than a spacer stack as well. It's just a shame the awful looks cancel out any performance gain..

3Pio
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Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 7:13 pm

by 3Pio

hannawald wrote:
Fri Oct 26, 2018 5:41 pm
Those of you who need to have more stem spacers under the stem, are there any tips how to make it look better?
How many is too much? (From my observation around 2,5cm of spacers is max to look good)
Do you prefer less spacers and stem to positive?
Do you prefer conical spacers?
Do you rotate bars upwards?

(Don´t say to buy endurance or custom geometry bikes:)
I just noticed ur thread.. Beside just the look with more spacers with is not so aesthetic, can u feel any flex while sprinting, or on fast downhill with cross winds, or any flex situation because of 30mm spacers u have?

Or its just pure aesthetic here? BTW, dont look that bad :)

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wheelbuilder
Posts: 714
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:10 am

by wheelbuilder

3Pio wrote:
Fri Nov 16, 2018 3:48 pm
hannawald wrote:
Fri Oct 26, 2018 5:41 pm
Those of you who need to have more stem spacers under the stem, are there any tips how to make it look better?
How many is too much? (From my observation around 2,5cm of spacers is max to look good)
Do you prefer less spacers and stem to positive?
Do you prefer conical spacers?
Do you rotate bars upwards?

(Don´t say to buy endurance or custom geometry bikes:)
I just noticed ur thread.. Beside just the look with more spacers with is not so aesthetic, can u feel any flex while sprinting, or on fast downhill with cross winds, or any flex situation because of 30mm spacers u have?

Or its just pure aesthetic here? BTW, dont look that bad :)
This needs to be taken into account. I've always felt that the shorter the steerer, the better the bike handles. Especially in tight downhill switchbacks. I test ride a lot of bikes of vastly different front end set-ups, and the bikes that have a stack of spacers handle poorly imo.
Never cheer before you know who is winning

spinwax
Shop Owner
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Location: USA

by spinwax

RocketRacing wrote:
Tue Oct 30, 2018 4:58 pm
Good call on the top cap transitioning to spacer being key for a nice appearance. Black on black never hurts either.

My plan was to drop a bit farther, i am sure i could easily slam it, but right now i have two nice carbon spacers so i am in no rush. Plus, by bending my elbows on the drops, i am plenty low. This is a 90mm -17 stem. Frame is a size small.

Also note how i have my hoods dipped pretty far forward. I am decreasing the surface area that the wind sees as much as possible.

Image
Why would you put a -17 stem on with a bunch of spacers? This is counterintuitive. A -6 or -7 stem with less spacers will be similar in aero benefits, look better (subjective of course), and be slightly lighter.

OnTheRivet
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 9:41 pm

by OnTheRivet

I'm going to go a different direction. Start by lowering and leveling your saddle. Your saddle should be low enough that you can ride comfortably with the saddle level. A nose down saddle is a sure sign it's too high. With the saddle lower you probably won't be leaning forward putting so much weight on your hands and could probably remove a spacer or two from under the stem.

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