Transferring cleat position. New/different shoes

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dgasmd
Posts: 1447
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 5:10 am
Location: South Florida

by dgasmd

After decades of riding, I always find it nearly imposible to find a way to transfer cleat position accurately to new shows, even if the same model. Much worse when it is to a new shoe. Takes all kinds of tricks and riding/adjusting several times before they end up close enough. Add to it the fact that one of my legs is shorter than the other.

New cleats in the same shoe is an easy one. Take “white out” or sharpie and trace along the edge of the old cleat. Replace and reposition the new one over the tracing. Pretty accurate.

What method or device do you personally use to adjust new cleats or transfer their position to new shoes???

I use Time XPro pedals btw in case it makes any difference.

by Weenie


BdaGhisallo
Posts: 2041
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 1:38 pm

by BdaGhisallo

There are always jigs like these that you could get to make it much easier. If you are transferring cleats to a new shoe of the same type and size then these work great. If you are trying a new brand of shoe then there is so amount of experimenation you'll have to do to determine your correct cleat position on the new ones.

http://www.bicisupport.it/index.cfm/CLE ... oli&id=389

or if you want to get fancier

http://www.bicisupport.it/index.cfm/PED ... oli&id=512

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wheelsONfire
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Location: NorthEU

by wheelsONfire

Do you know what the "budget version" cost?
Bikes:

Ax Lightness Vial EVO D
Paduano Racing Fidia
Open *UP*
https://opencycle.com/showcase/the-xplo ... eelsonfire

shimmeD
Posts: 443
Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:52 pm
Location: eNZed

by shimmeD

http://www.bicisupport.it/index.cfm/PED ... oli&id=512 suggested by Ghisallo looks like meausrements are taken on the outside of the shoes, not totally best for shoes with differing heels. I try (crudely) to measure from the inside back of the foot to the cleat to get the fore-aft placement of cleat, using combination square ("The combination square is a handy little tool for the carpenter/joiner. It has an adjustable ruled blade that you can lock in place with the turn of a screw."), level, and whatever else to do the job. I then use sight and feel to get the Q factor close to the old shoes.
Less is more.

BdaGhisallo
Posts: 2041
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 1:38 pm

by BdaGhisallo

shimmeD wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:33 pm
http://www.bicisupport.it/index.cfm/PED ... oli&id=512 suggested by Ghisallo looks like meausrements are taken on the outside of the shoes, not totally best for shoes with differing heels. I try (crudely) to measure from the inside back of the foot to the cleat to get the fore-aft placement of cleat, using combination square ("The combination square is a handy little tool for the carpenter/joiner. It has an adjustable ruled blade that you can lock in place with the turn of a screw."), level, and whatever else to do the job. I then use sight and feel to get the Q factor close to the old shoes.
This is another good one. https://www.d2shoe.com/copy-of-about-2 You'll see at the link that it can be used to measure precisely from the heel to the cleat to establish the fore and aft position of the cleat on any shoe. I have one and it works great.

shimmeD
Posts: 443
Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:52 pm
Location: eNZed

by shimmeD

Bingo! Thanks Ghisallo :up: Looks like not terribly difficult to make up something yourself similar.
Less is more.

KotP
Posts: 60
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:31 am

by KotP

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ergon-pedal-cleat-tool

...or you can go to the trouble doing it yourself with carboard and ruled lines, but it's relatively inexpensive.

Some useful tips can probably be found here too:

https://youtu.be/VmN5KxcZLfw?t=192

BdaGhisallo
Posts: 2041
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 1:38 pm

by BdaGhisallo

KotP wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:17 am
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ergon-pedal-cleat-tool

...or you can go to the trouble doing it yourself with carboard and ruled lines, but it's relatively inexpensive.

Some useful tips can probably be found here too:

https://youtu.be/VmN5KxcZLfw?t=192
The Ergon tool is great too, if they make one for the pedal system you use. They even make one for Splay but all it does it locate the cleat fore/aft and side to side. You can't use it to check the angular orientation since all the float is within the cleat, of course.

NickJHP
Posts: 124
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:22 am

by NickJHP

I have my cleats in the same position and angle on both left and right shoes, so I just match up the cleat position/angle on one of the new shoes with the opposite existing shoe by putting the shoes sole to sole. Repeat for the other shoe. I've been doing it that way for almost half a century. It's much easier these days with bolts and adjusting slots in the cleats than back when cleats were nailed onto the shoe sole.

by Weenie


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