Gearing too high. Swap front or rear?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Beanicyclist
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2018 7:45 pm

by Beanicyclist

Oh ok, I’d probably get the cassette then. You’ll find one for a decent price, just make sure that your derailleur can fit it. You can normally ignore all the limitations, so fitting a 28t on the rear should be ok. Check with your LBS maybe or try using a friends or improvising?

-BC
"Eat your green vegetables"- Peter Parker, 2004.

by Weenie


mattr
Posts: 3914
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

alcatraz wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 6:54 am
You might not think the 11t cog to be important now but get it anyway. If you someday get a compact crank you are going to wish you had.

11-28t or 11-30t.

/a
Nah, i got a 12 up cassette by mistake (mispackaged) rode around with it on a compact for 2 years, didn't notice up until i came to replace it and couldn't remember what i'd bought, had a closer look and realised it wasn't the 11 up i usually ride. That includes a lot of (very) fast descending and fast road work.

All depends how good (or otherwise) you are at higher cadences. Or judging when a tuck will be faster than pedalling.

On a bigger cassette, the extra mid cassette sprocket is more useful/useable than an 11 as well.

alcatraz
Posts: 1344
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

The difference between 12t and 11t is 9%. It's a nice contribution to your range which helps when you tour or go climbing at lower cadences. If you never use it then you could just put a 46t chainring on and get smaller jumps on the whole cassette and easier front shifting. (Just an idea. :))

If you are doing flat roads a lot then 12-25t cassettes make a lot of sense so you can dial in the cadence perfectly.

The 16t cog is sacrificed in most cassettes over 12-25/12-27t. The jump from 15t to 17t is 13%.

Some people dislike a jump of 13% instead of two 7% jumps, but some people dislike the loss of 9% range. I happen to be in the latter group, mattr is in the first.

Just an interesting little sidenote is that 9% loss in range is about the same loss of range that a 2.5t reduction on your largest cog would do. Some people upgrade cassettes to obtain less than that (28-30t).

Svetty
Posts: 526
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:06 pm
Location: Yorkshire - God's Own Country

by Svetty

853guy wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:51 pm
Svetty wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:32 pm
The 7800 series official maximum cassette sprocket is a 27T. A 28 will work OK but a 30 might be pushing it......
Hi Svetty,

It won't be Dura Ace 7800, since I can't find any 12-27 cassettes in any case, and the ones I can find are limited to 12-21.

The honour instead will go to good ole' Ultegra 6700, which are plentiful, cheap and to be honest, indistinguishable in shifting quality and real-world weight to the 7800 ones - to me, at least.

Best,

853guy
I meant the mech capacity not the cassette.....

User avatar
853guy
Posts: 160
Joined: Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:48 pm

by 853guy

Svetty wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:12 pm
853guy wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:51 pm
Svetty wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:32 pm
The 7800 series official maximum cassette sprocket is a 27T. A 28 will work OK but a 30 might be pushing it......
Hi Svetty,

It won't be Dura Ace 7800, since I can't find any 12-27 cassettes in any case, and the ones I can find are limited to 12-21.

The honour instead will go to good ole' Ultegra 6700, which are plentiful, cheap and to be honest, indistinguishable in shifting quality and real-world weight to the 7800 ones - to me, at least.

Best,

853guy
I meant the mech capacity not the cassette.....
Ah, yes, okay, that does indeed make sense.

Like you suggest, I'm also hoping a 28 will be fine but will be checking with a LBS to ensure whatever ends up going on works.

Thanks for the clarification.

Best!

853guy

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post