Which handlebar fold buy to increase comfort

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
dedobike
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by dedobike

I have a tarmac sl6 bike measuring 54 with 3 cm of thickness under the stem, unfortunately I suffer from a certain stiffness to the back and therefore I have little flexibility.

To limit the use of shims and to increase the comfort of the bike I'm thinking of changing the handlebars, I currently mounted a FSA K-Force Light Compact handlebar (420mm, 125mm drop, 80mm reach)

I am undecided between these two models:

- Aerofly rise 25mm Specialized (width 420mm, 130mm drop, 80mm reach) the rise of 25mm would allow me to remove some thickness however the fold is not compact in fact the 130mm drop against 125mm of the FSA model k-force light

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/s-wor ... /p/131077

-3T Superergo (the BMC team) width 420mm, drop 119mm, reach 77mm
https://www.3t.bike/en/products/dropbar ... 559.htmlm


This fold has a drop of only 119mm, however, it is without the rise as the specialized but it is really compact so with 3cm of thickness I would have a drop of half a centimeter smaller than the fold FSA


Which handlebar fold would you recommend to buy?

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Handlebars don't have much impact if any on comfort.

by Weenie


bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

So long as the shape is right of course.

Bloody predictive text.
Last edited by bm0p700f on Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dedobike
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by dedobike

Well if I have little flexibility means that I bend a little with the back and then I can not have much difference in height between the saddle and the handlebars for this I had to insert 3cm of thickness quinid I think that the model aerofly specialized with the laugh of 25mm maybe is the most suitable for me ... do not you agree?

ernestkus
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by ernestkus

The Aerofly will give you same reach, 25mm more stack on the hood and 20mm more stack on the drop

3T will give you 3mm less reach, same stack on the hood, 6mm more stack on the drop

Do you spend a lot of your riding on the drop?

07stuntin6r
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by 07stuntin6r

I got a nice Zipp Contour sl on competitive cyist for $98 in 42cm. Tried it today and it cut out vibrations pretty good

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liam7020
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by liam7020

I'm assuming you have already gone down the route of more off-bike training to improve your flexibility - stretching, core strengthening etc?
Tarmac SL6 & Campag Record EPS https://weightweenies.starbike.com/foru ... 0&t=153968

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vejnemojnen
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by vejnemojnen

bm0p700f wrote:
Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:14 pm
Handlebars don't have much impact if any on comfort.
How so? There can be huge differences in how they transmit road vibration. Ie.: light alloy bars (Deda Zero100, Ritchey WCS or Cannondale C1) are lightyears more comfortable, than overbuilt boat anchors, noticeably less buzz gets through them.

And most carbon bars just soak up rough routes even more nicely. I think, the most important parts are those which are contact points. Handlebars, saddle-seatpost, pedals-cleats-shoes.

Or at least, for me.. :) Minute differences in some cases, but small things do add up.

I'm guessing the OP is after something like these?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/ROCKBROS-Road- ... lbEGQawgPg

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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

vejnemojnen wrote:
bm0p700f wrote:
Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:14 pm
Handlebars don't have much impact if any on comfort.
How so? There can be huge differences in how they transmit road vibration. Ie.: light alloy bars (Deda Zero100, Ritchey WCS or Cannondale C1) are lightyears more comfortable, than overbuilt boat anchors, noticeably less buzz gets through them.

And most carbon bars just soak up rough routes even more nicely. I think, the most important parts are those which are contact points. Handlebars, saddle-seatpost, pedals-cleats-shoes.

Or at least, for me.. :) Minute differences in some cases, but small things do add up.

I'm guessing the OP is after something like these?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/ROCKBROS-Road- ... lbEGQawgPg
Last I checked credible sources, “tend” was a marketing buzz word. Carbon “tend” to damp high-frequency vibration better than aluminum bars.
It would be interesting to quantify carbon bar damping; one way to do so would be to wire an accelerometer to the drops and then gently strike or pluck the bar, letting it “ring” at its natural frequency. One could then read the accelerometer data to see how quickly the vibrations dissipated.

Until then, carbon “tend” to reduce vibration is all in your head. In retrospect, aluminum frame with wider supple tires reduce vibration a whole lot more than carbon frame with narrow race tires.
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dedobike
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by dedobike

liam7020 wrote:I'm assuming you have already gone down the route of more off-bike training to improve your flexibility - stretching, core strengthening etc?
Yes, my little flexibility is a problem now structured, I think I take the handlebar fold aerofly specialized with 25mm of Rise... What do you think

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mattr
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by mattr

bm0p700f wrote:
Sat Aug 25, 2018 3:31 pm
So long as the shape is tight of course.
So a massive impact then.

Unless what you meant was handlebar material doesn't make a massive impact.

As for shape my dozen or so assorted road and MTB bars with the wrong sweep/reach/curve/width/whatever will testify to the handlebar making a massive difference.
Material, not really, as long as you are using the same relative quality and design of bar i.e. comparing apples and apples, not apples and a 500 gram OE bar from an entry level bike.

I should really look at selling them. It's not like i'll suddenly decide to use them again......

DamonRinard
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by DamonRinard

Quote from "The Relative Contribution of Road Bicycle Components on Vibration Induced to the Cyclist" :

Abstract
Improving comfort in road bicycle design is a paramount concern for cyclists, who are affected by the vibrations caused by constant contact with the road surface. The cycling community has deployed many efforts in the attempt to understand and improve bicycle comfort. However, these attempts have been focused on specific components such as the fork, frame and wheels without knowing their relative influence on vibration induced to the bicyclist (VIB). The objective of this paper is to assess the relative contribution of bicycle components on the VIB at the cyclist’s hands and buttocks. A factorial design test comparing the VIB in acceleration, force and power of different bicycle components has already shown that the handlebar and fork are the preponderant components for the VIB measured at the cyclist’s hands. At the buttocks, the preponderant components are the wheels and frame.

End quote.

Source: http://velus.recherche.usherbrooke.ca/p ... ons_a.html
Damon Rinard
Engineering Manager, Road Bikes
Cycling Sports Group, Cannondale
Ex-Kestrel, ex-Velomax, ex-Trek, ex-Cervelo

Stitchking
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by Stitchking

DamonRinard wrote:Quote from "The Relative Contribution of Road Bicycle Components on Vibration Induced to the Cyclist" :

Abstract
Improving comfort in road bicycle design is a paramount concern for cyclists, who are affected by the vibrations caused by constant contact with the road surface. The cycling community has deployed many efforts in the attempt to understand and improve bicycle comfort. However, these attempts have been focused on specific components such as the fork, frame and wheels without knowing their relative influence on vibration induced to the bicyclist (VIB). The objective of this paper is to assess the relative contribution of bicycle components on the VIB at the cyclist’s hands and buttocks. A factorial design test comparing the VIB in acceleration, force and power of different bicycle components has already shown that the handlebar and fork are the preponderant components for the VIB measured at the cyclist’s hands. At the buttocks, the preponderant components are the wheels and frame.

End quote.

Source: http://velus.recherche.usherbrooke.ca/p ... ons_a.html
For those of us without an academic subscription, what is the conclusion of this study damon?

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dedobike
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Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:51 pm

by dedobike

I'm glad that the discussion has raised your interest, however, let's focus on the focus of the question ... what do you think of this specialized handlebar fold?


Why specialized added the 25mm rise characteristics?

https://www.sigmasports.com/item/Specia ... lebar/EO8J

:beerchug:

by Weenie


Stitchking
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri May 25, 2018 7:30 am

by Stitchking

dedobike wrote:I'm glad that the discussion has raised your interest, however, let's focus on the focus of the question ... what do you think of this specialized handlebar fold?


Why specialized added the 25mm rise characteristics?

https://www.sigmasports.com/item/Specia ... lebar/EO8J

:beerchug:
Iirc it was more aero to have a -17 degree stem and a riser bar than to have a normal -7 stem and no rise. Both have same hood height all other things being equal.

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