Help me spend money (Soma Smoothie build help needed)

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Toby
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2012 4:30 am

by Toby

It's not that it's too loud; it's just not to my taste. Neither is the green. Nor the Black Mountain. I'm really curious though, about what makes everyone so negative on the Smoothie when the reactions in the "rainy day race bike" thread were so positive.

The Goodship frame could have potential, but they're out in 56 in the orange and the full build is SRAM.

Are all these lower-priced steel options really worse than an R2? Bearing in mind that a more expensive steel frame isn't happening. Sadly.

by Weenie


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mpulsiv
Posts: 1189
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:17 pm

by mpulsiv

Toby wrote:
Mon Aug 13, 2018 11:47 pm
It's not that it's too loud; it's just not to my taste. Neither is the green. Nor the Black Mountain. I'm really curious though, about what makes everyone so negative on the Smoothie when the reactions in the "rainy day race bike" thread were so positive.

The Goodship frame could have potential, but they're out in 56 in the orange and the full build is SRAM.

Are all these lower-priced steel options really worse than an R2? Bearing in mind that a more expensive steel frame isn't happening. Sadly.
I'm not negative about Soma. Like I said I almost bought one but steered away due to limited tire clearance.
If you plan to ride in foul-weather, prepare to strip Soma every season and spray it thoroughly inside the tubes with frame saver www.jensonusa.com/JP-Weigle-Frame-Saver-Aerosol-Can
Mr. Pink frame is treated with "Electrophoretic Deposition". This coating acts as both a rust preventative inside and a primer out.
Racing is a three-dimensional high-speed chess game, involving hundreds of pieces on the board.

:arrow: CBA = Chronic Bike Addiction
:arrow: OCD = Obsessive Cycling Disorder

Toby
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2012 4:30 am

by Toby

mpulsiv wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 12:05 am
Toby wrote:
Mon Aug 13, 2018 11:47 pm
It's not that it's too loud; it's just not to my taste. Neither is the green. Nor the Black Mountain. I'm really curious though, about what makes everyone so negative on the Smoothie when the reactions in the "rainy day race bike" thread were so positive.

The Goodship frame could have potential, but they're out in 56 in the orange and the full build is SRAM.

Are all these lower-priced steel options really worse than an R2? Bearing in mind that a more expensive steel frame isn't happening. Sadly.
I'm not negative about Soma. Like I said I almost bought one but steered away due to limited tire clearance.
If you plan to ride in foul-weather, prepare to strip Soma every season and spray it thoroughly inside the tubes with frame saver www.jensonusa.com/JP-Weigle-Frame-Saver-Aerosol-Can
Mr. Pink frame is treated with "Electrophoretic Deposition". This coating acts as both a rust preventative inside and a primer out.
Oh. I live in Austin (and as alluded to, am really a tri geek); on the occasions that the weather's bad I stay my butt indoors on the trainer or run. Or swim. Riding in the rain happens when it's unexpected and catches us out, which happened just a couple of weeks ago but the overwhelming majority of our riding is HOT and unreletingly sunny.

I had almost decided on the Smoothie before this thread, now I'm all ruminating.

Nbriles2000
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:21 am

by Nbriles2000

There is nothing wrong with Soma's really. They're just overbuilt and kinda heavy (even for steel) but that's really pretty standard with most modern production steel frames.

The heavier gauge tubing is technically more "bombprof." I think manufacturers make them this way purposefully because they assume that's what the people who buy steel frames want.

This thicker tubing also can lead to what people describe as a "dull" ride quality. Thinner tubing is often described as "lively" and Jan Heine has a lengthy article about a phenomenon called "planning" in which the bike has just the right amount of flex and helps prevent power loss.

Whether you believe that or not, this is still weight weenies and a lighter frame is rarely a bad thing!

Frameset material is important when it comes to ride comfort, but tires are everything. If I was going for comfort, I'd take a gas pipe steel frame with 650b x 42 over a Soma with 700c x 28mm.

I think another great option for you is a Soma Fog Cutter. Way bigger tire clearance than the smoothie and still pretty inexpensive

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mpulsiv
Posts: 1189
Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:17 pm

by mpulsiv

Nbriles2000 wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:19 am
There is nothing wrong with Soma's really. They're just overbuilt and kinda heavy (even for steel) but that's really pretty standard with most modern production steel frames.

The heavier gauge tubing is technically more "bombprof." I think manufacturers make them this way purposefully because they assume that's what the people who buy steel frames want.

This thicker tubing also can lead to what people describe as a "dull" ride quality. Thinner tubing is often described as "lively" and Jan Heine has a lengthy article about a phenomenon called "planning" in which the bike has just the right amount of flex and helps prevent power loss.

Whether you believe that or not, this is still weight weenies and a lighter frame is rarely a bad thing!

Frameset material is important when it comes to ride comfort, but tires are everything. If I was going for comfort, I'd take a gas pipe steel frame with 650b x 42 over a Soma with 700c x 28mm.

I think another great option for you is a Soma Fog Cutter. Way bigger tire clearance than the smoothie and still pretty inexpensive
I agree with you about thinner tubing. I'm no expert when it comes to steel, but this a good source www.strongframes.com/tubing-information to learn about tubing, however tubing diameter is not listed because it's up to the builder.
Soma Fog Cutter is disc only and same tubing (e.g. 4130 Tange Prestige) as Smoothie.
I don't think OP is seeking anything wider than 28mm. Throwing 650b into the mix is very much gravel specific.
Smoothie and Mr. Pink are the most affordable that I came across. Gunnar Sport is great frame http://gunnarbikes.com/site/bikes/sport. I don't remember the source but it's at least 200 grams lighter with True Temper OX Platinum tubing. Nice paint jobs, custom paint is also available. Last I checked, it was $1200 for frame + $400 for carbon fork.

I won't mention frame weight of my Mr. Pink. If you find out, you may steer clear from any steel frame :beerchug:
Racing is a three-dimensional high-speed chess game, involving hundreds of pieces on the board.

:arrow: CBA = Chronic Bike Addiction
:arrow: OCD = Obsessive Cycling Disorder

Toby
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2012 4:30 am

by Toby

Thanks all for the extra details.

Yes, of course all else equal I'd rather a lighter bike, but the budget is what it is, and much as I'd love a Stinner Gibraltar it's not going to happen, because the upper bound for this is the R2. I had also come across the Gunnar but that faces the same problem: $1600 for the frame & fork means that the only way to finish it under budget would be with 105 at best, and that probably still wouldn't work in the end. Money over that is to make sure the race bike gets Di2. Heck, for the price of the Stinner frame alone I could get the R2 and the correct native Quarq instead of needing to adapt the BSC one I have.

The Goodship frame & fork for $600 would be a bonkers good buy, and maybe I should see if I can scare one up. They're out of my size though, of course, and I assume any restocking will be next year's model for retail.

Not interested in disc brakes for now. Maybe for the next set of bikes. And 650b has the same issue: one of the goals here for sticking with 700c and rim brakes is to continue to use our library of wheels. Again, while I'm sure they're comfy, 28s will be a lot nicer than 23s.

I even would have considered the BD (boo hiss, yes I know) Motobecane Gran Premio Pro. Reynolds 853, R8000, a decent paintjob, and I can toss out a crummy FSA crankset instead of a nicer one. The problem is it specifies "clearance for most tires up to 25c", which isn't enough.

Bah. Maybe the R2 is the best deal here.

Nbriles2000
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 4:21 am

by Nbriles2000

I actually thought a lot about that motobecane, too. I actually just bought a Raleigh Grand Vittesse on a whim because there was a fantastic deal on their corporate site. Also 853, but with 6800 Ultegra. I'm currently working on replacing stock junk parts to get the weight down and after I replace the 2kg wheelset I think it's gonna be great.

It's pretty similar to the Motobecane, but there are reports that it can fit 32's

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