Wheels with alu brake track for the mountains

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
TurboTommy
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:32 pm

by TurboTommy

Hi guys

I’m going away the weekend after next and I’d like a set of alu brake track wheels as back up for my carbon wheelset. I planned to just take a set of zondas but they were on a bike that was stolen last week.

My main criteria are:

Around or under 1500g
Good hubs
Tubular or tubular compatible
Reasonably stiff (I’m 80kg)

I’m finding hard to look past fulcrum racing nite at the moment. I’d be interested in handbuilts but not sure I’d get them in time.

Grateful for all advice!

mattr
Posts: 3544
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

TurboTommy wrote:
Sun Jun 17, 2018 5:11 pm
Tubular or tubular compatible
Tubeless you mean?
Rims are either tubular or not.

by Weenie


TurboTommy
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:32 pm

by TurboTommy

mattr wrote:
Sun Jun 17, 2018 5:21 pm
TurboTommy wrote:
Sun Jun 17, 2018 5:11 pm
Tubular or tubular compatible
Tubeless you mean?
Rims are either tubular or not.
Yes sorry predictive text

Harpoon
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2018 6:15 pm

by Harpoon

CRC have the DT Swiss Dicut RR 21 for £359, code MID2018 should get another £20 off that.

Quoted weights come in just under 1500g

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/s?q=rr21&cat=direct

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themidge
Posts: 623
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:19 pm
Location: Auld Reekie

by themidge

Shimano Dura Ace c24 clincher? Dunno whether they're tubeless compatible, but I have some and they're very good. Lightweight at 1400g, not super expensive even new, really smooth and solid hubs, can't really comment on stiffness though as I weigh 51kg :D.
All Campagnolo wheels have pretty good hubs from what I hear and the Shamals and Zondas are tubeless compatible (I think...).
You don't have time for custom now, but for future trips that's usually the best way of getting lightweight alloy rimmed climbing wheels.
:hello:
Cannondale Supersix 2008 (weight: 7.3kg)
B'twin Triban 540 (in bits)
Vitus "Benotto" 979 (weight: :? )

wingguy
Posts: 3974
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 11:43 pm

by wingguy

Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST (1520g) or Pro UST (1410g) well worth looking at.

Hands down the easiest tubeless setup there is on a set of road wheels, they even come with the tyres installed and beads seated.

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Miller
Posts: 1305
Joined: Thu Sep 21, 2006 8:54 pm
Location: Reading, UK

by Miller

themidge wrote:
Sun Jun 17, 2018 6:19 pm
All Campagnolo wheels have pretty good hubs from what I hear and the Shamals and Zondas are tubeless compatible (I think...).
...If they have the 'two-way fit' designation. Campag seem to have backed off from that slightly (just as tubeless is making real inroads), I don't think the new disc Zondas come in a 2-way version, for example.

Mr.Gib
Posts: 3140
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

I'll second winguy. I just set up a mavic UST wheelset - incredibly easy. If you want tubeless you can't do better. The wheels will be as solid as anything out there and Mavic's new tires are also being well received.

Also, not sure exactly what mountains you are headed to, but I am the same weight and I would never consider carbon wheels for the task. Of course it can be done, but if you get the wrong combination of factors and you'll be wishing you had alloy rims. Imagine decending Tre Cime behind a line of traffic on a hot day. Rain on carbon would really piss me off also.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

alcatraz
Posts: 974
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

If I may steal the thread a bit I was wondering if anyone has compared what rim around 50mm deep with alloy brake tracks weighs relatively less. A heavier climber friend would like to keep alloy brake tracks on his front wheel and lace it to extralite hubs.

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Lelandjt
Posts: 421
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2016 7:10 am

by Lelandjt

I'd also be be curious if there's any alloy/carbon 38-50mm deep rims that aren't heavy. The only ones I can find are Farsports, etc and like 100+g per rim heavier than my carbon 50 & 38s. I miss the alloy brake track sometimes but don't want to give up my light, aero 23mm wide rims.

TurboTommy
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:32 pm

by TurboTommy

Mr.Gib wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:04 am
I'll second winguy. I just set up a mavic UST wheelset - incredibly easy. If you want tubeless you can't do better. The wheels will be as solid as anything out there and Mavic's new tires are also being well received.

Also, not sure exactly what mountains you are headed to, but I am the same weight and I would never consider carbon wheels for the task. Of course it can be done, but if you get the wrong combination of factors and you'll be wishing you had alloy rims. Imagine decending Tre Cime behind a line of traffic on a hot day. Rain on carbon would really piss me off also.
Thanks for your advice. The mountains in question are the French Pyrenees. I apreiciate what you’re saying about carbon. Under other circumstances perhaps I’d be more weary. But we will have a support van for this trip, so it means if for any reason I want to swap out the carbon ( Lightweight tubs), I can at any point. So that’s made the decision a little easier.

It is a bit of a pain I’ve got to make a decision on this so close to the trip.
Last edited by TurboTommy on Mon Jun 18, 2018 7:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

TurboTommy
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:32 pm

by TurboTommy

.

alexmcm09
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:02 am

by alexmcm09

DT Swiss PR 1400 Dicut Oxic wheels - they're brilliant.

Ceramic brake track has amazing stopping power, they're all black (so they have that great all carbon look), DT Swiss 240 internals so they are stupidly easy to service and incredibly durable, relatively lightweight at circa 1500g, tubeless ready (they come with tape preinstalled), relatively wide rim at 18mm internal and very, very stiff.

I was using a set of Dura Ace C24s but had terrible brake rub while climbing anything steep. I'm 74kg and put down a fair bit of power while climbing, but have never noticed any flex from the DT Swiss wheels.

I'd have no worries descending in the Alps with them as well.

They're available for less about 700GBP so on par with the Fulcrums.

alexmcm09
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:02 am

by alexmcm09

Obviously it goes without saying, but just in case you forget - make sure you change the brake pads if you're swapping between carbon and aluminium wheelsets!

by Weenie


Mr.Gib
Posts: 3140
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

TurboTommy wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 7:15 am
Mr.Gib wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:04 am
I'll second winguy. I just set up a mavic UST wheelset - incredibly easy. If you want tubeless you can't do better. The wheels will be as solid as anything out there and Mavic's new tires are also being well received.

Also, not sure exactly what mountains you are headed to, but I am the same weight and I would never consider carbon wheels for the task. Of course it can be done, but if you get the wrong combination of factors and you'll be wishing you had alloy rims. Imagine decending Tre Cime behind a line of traffic on a hot day. Rain on carbon would really piss me off also.
Thanks for your advice. The mountains in question are the French Pyrenees. I apreiciate what you’re saying about carbon. Under other circumstances perhaps I’d be more weary. But we will have a support van for this trip, so it means if for any reason I want to swap out the carbon ( Lightweight tubs), I can at any point. So that’s made the decision a little easier.

It is a bit of a pain I’ve got to make a decision on this so close to the trip.
Well if it must be carbon than tubulars are the lesser evil. Racing on closed roads is OK with carbon wheels but for a fun bike trip I still wouldn't do it at 80 kg. And the Pyrenees... if you've not been before, be prepared for some very sketchy surfaces. There is chip seal that is like ice when it gets wet, surprise puddles of sheep piss in the switch backs, big smears of animal diarhea in the critical braking points, herds of cattle that step out on the road in high speed curves, etc. If you're the type that descends aggressively, you want the best braking you can muster and the biggest tires your bike will accomodate run at the lowest pressures that you are willing to ride. Save some skin. Oh, and a good place to contemplate wheel and tire choice is at the Casartelli memorial.
Image
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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