Factor O2 experience and size

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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lostrainbow
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:54 pm

by lostrainbow

Wondering if anyone has had experience Factor O2 and Black Inc wheels. It looks really nice. But how does it ride? Is it stiff, is it comfortable and is there any quality or reliability issues? Crosswinds?

The most important is the sizing since I can't test ride one before purchasing. My current bike is a Mekk Poggio size 50 with a 120mm stem, it is closes to a 52 of Factor than 49. Is that the case? How do I determine the stem length then?

Thanks for any inputs!

Update:
The geometry for Mekk Poggio https://geometrygeeks.bike/bike/mekk-poggio-1-6-2015/
Factor O2 https://factorbikes.com/product/factor-o2/#GEOMETRY

lostrainbow
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:54 pm

by lostrainbow

anyone?

by Weenie


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Beaver
Posts: 501
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:06 pm
Location: Lower Saxony - Germany

by Beaver

No personal experience with this bike, but it always appeared to me as a too expensive Canyon Ultimate CF with BBRight - for the price of the frameset you could get a 665g Canyon Ultimate Evo and some nice wheels.

Those 30mm high rims wouldn't trouble you in crosswinds though, they are "standard" China quality, 17mm inside is on the narrow side today and the hubs I don't recognize. Could last - or not.

Fiery
Posts: 420
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 9:21 am

by Fiery

Size 54 is the closest to what you have right now, around 5 mm more stack and reach. Size 52 is a fair bit smaller, while the 49 is not even close. The 54 should fit you fine with a 110 mm stem.

wingguy
Posts: 4198
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 11:43 pm

by wingguy

Factor/Black Inc have their own factory in Taiwan that did a lot of high end manufacturing for other brands before the current range of Factor bikes was released, so 'standard China quality' for the rims is a little misleading, IMO :wink: The hubs are again an in-house design and specifically built around CeramicSpeed bearings. Not sure what longterm freehub reliability is like though.

For the geometry it's a ballache that Mekk don't do stack and reach, cos the difference in STA will be throwing the TT measurement out, and there's no guarantee the forks are the same height either. Easiest thing is to either physically measure stack and reach on your bike, or buy the Factor from a shop which will either fit you for it or translate your current bike's measurements for you - whichever you prefer.

lostrainbow
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:54 pm

by lostrainbow

Beaver wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:40 pm
No personal experience with this bike, but it always appeared to me as a too expensive Canyon Ultimate CF with BBRight - for the price of the frameset you could get a 665g Canyon Ultimate Evo and some nice wheels.

Those 30mm high rims wouldn't trouble you in crosswinds though, they are "standard" China quality, 17mm inside is on the narrow side today and the hubs I don't recognize. Could last - or not.
Canyon also manufactures their frames in China. The quality can vary quite a lot depends on manufactures and quality control. Indeed, I am considering Canyon, but I don't like the fact that I have to purchase a complete integrated handlebar, full price, to have a longer stem.

lostrainbow
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:54 pm

by lostrainbow

wingguy wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:13 pm
Factor/Black Inc have their own factory in Taiwan that did a lot of high end manufacturing for other brands before the current range of Factor bikes was released, so 'standard China quality' for the rims is a little misleading, IMO :wink: The hubs are again an in-house design and specifically built around CeramicSpeed bearings. Not sure what longterm freehub reliability is like though.

For the geometry it's a ballache that Mekk don't do stack and reach, cos the difference in STA will be throwing the TT measurement out, and there's no guarantee the forks are the same height either. Easiest thing is to either physically measure stack and reach on your bike, or buy the Factor from a shop which will either fit you for it or translate your current bike's measurements for you - whichever you prefer.
I will measure it today and I will also see if I can get response from Factor. The dealer locator tool on their website doesn't work. So I don't know in which bike shop I can test ride one. Thanks for the input!

cdncyclist
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 12:10 am

by cdncyclist

Disclosure and conflict of interest - recently purchased one, went with the black inc wheels (50mm and tubular), seatpost, and integrated stem.

There is a lot of interesting information available on the company and history - while some of it is marketing, there appears to be substance behind some of the things that wingguy mentioned above. David Millar is involved and has quite a bit on his Chpt III site.

I can't comment on the fit and sizing info you are seeking, except to say that in my opinion it is a mistake to purchased any high end bike without proper fit and measurement, ideally with an opportunity to make some changes if needed. This is even more important if you go with an integrated bar and stem.

I wanted deeper section tubular wheels, and decided to give the Black inc a try. They are substantially less costly (about 2/3 the cost) than other wheels I was considering (ENVE). The braking perhaps isn't quite a great as ENVE's (I have 3.4s), and have not tried them in the wet. I am happy with them - subjectively the wheels seem fast (although this might be because they are deeper section). There was a review on these wheels on the cyclingtips website.

To answer your other questions:
- the bike looks fantastic, I have had a lot of people comment on it
- this is a racing bike - it is responsive and feels (subjectively) fast. Comfort is often in the tires (width and pressure) - I don't find that this bike is substantially different comfort wise from other racing bikes I have owned (cannondale evo, etc).
- I can't really answer your question on crosswinds, as I haven't ridden other similar depth wheels (and frankly doubt I would be able to provide an informed answer on the differences). I have ridden the 50s even on quite windy days and while one has to be a little more cautious, I don't find them to be an issue. Not sure what depth you are going with though.
- quality - it is a well put together bike. I am not sure I believe there is any real advantage to ceramic bearings, but they are a nice touch.
- reliability - so far so good, but 1200km is not enough to give an informed answer!

lostrainbow
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:54 pm

by lostrainbow

cdncyclist wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 9:54 pm
Disclosure and conflict of interest - recently purchased one, went with the black inc wheels (50mm and tubular), seatpost, and integrated stem.

There is a lot of interesting information available on the company and history - while some of it is marketing, there appears to be substance behind some of the things that wingguy mentioned above. David Millar is involved and has quite a bit on his Chpt III site.

I can't comment on the fit and sizing info you are seeking, except to say that in my opinion it is a mistake to purchased any high end bike without proper fit and measurement, ideally with an opportunity to make some changes if needed. This is even more important if you go with an integrated bar and stem.

I wanted deeper section tubular wheels, and decided to give the Black inc a try. They are substantially less costly (about 2/3 the cost) than other wheels I was considering (ENVE). The braking perhaps isn't quite a great as ENVE's (I have 3.4s), and have not tried them in the wet. I am happy with them - subjectively the wheels seem fast (although this might be because they are deeper section). There was a review on these wheels on the cyclingtips website.

To answer your other questions:
- the bike looks fantastic, I have had a lot of people comment on it
- this is a racing bike - it is responsive and feels (subjectively) fast. Comfort is often in the tires (width and pressure) - I don't find that this bike is substantially different comfort wise from other racing bikes I have owned (cannondale evo, etc).
- I can't really answer your question on crosswinds, as I haven't ridden other similar depth wheels (and frankly doubt I would be able to provide an informed answer on the differences). I have ridden the 50s even on quite windy days and while one has to be a little more cautious, I don't find them to be an issue. Not sure what depth you are going with though.
- quality - it is a well put together bike. I am not sure I believe there is any real advantage to ceramic bearings, but they are a nice touch.
- reliability - so far so good, but 1200km is not enough to give an informed answer!
Thank you! I will visit a bike fitter if I decide to go with Factor! I am also looking for a local dealer but the dealer locator on their website is not working and I have to leave a message and wait for reply. Did you contact Factor before purchasing? How is the customer service?

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itsacarr
Posts: 750
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 4:55 am
Contact:

by itsacarr

Customer service is spot on for people I know who have contacted them. Sizing is similar to Tarmac geometry. But a fitter is certainly your best bet on that - they do have stack and reach numbers on the site for good comparison.

I find the front of the bike maybe a hair quicker than my tarmac but similarly handling out of the saddle. It’s a light bike, no question so snappy going up. My black o2 is on the understated side so I threw on hi viz decals for fun. The build is as polished as an s-works in regards to finishing detail.

Good luck and let us know how it goes. Shoot me a message if you have any questions.

lostrainbow
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:54 pm

by lostrainbow

itsacarr wrote:
Fri Jun 15, 2018 2:39 am
Customer service is spot on for people I know who have contacted them. Sizing is similar to Tarmac geometry. But a fitter is certainly your best bet on that - they do have stack and reach numbers on the site for good comparison.

I find the front of the bike maybe a hair quicker than my tarmac but similarly handling out of the saddle. It’s a light bike, no question so snappy going up. My black o2 is on the understated side so I threw on hi viz decals for fun. The build is as polished as an s-works in regards to finishing detail.

Good luck and let us know how it goes. Shoot me a message if you have any questions.
Thank you! How can I contact them beside Leaving message on the website? Didn't find a phone number.

I will follow you on Ins!

by Weenie


User avatar
Beaver
Posts: 501
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 6:06 pm
Location: Lower Saxony - Germany

by Beaver

lostrainbow wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 9:00 pm
Beaver wrote:
Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:40 pm
No personal experience with this bike, but it always appeared to me as a too expensive Canyon Ultimate CF with BBRight - for the price of the frameset you could get a 665g Canyon Ultimate Evo and some nice wheels.

Those 30mm high rims wouldn't trouble you in crosswinds though, they are "standard" China quality, 17mm inside is on the narrow side today and the hubs I don't recognize. Could last - or not.
Canyon also manufactures their frames in China. The quality can vary quite a lot depends on manufactures and quality control. Indeed, I am considering Canyon, but I don't like the fact that I have to purchase a complete integrated handlebar, full price, to have a longer stem.
That "Made in China" wasn't meant to be negative. ;) Canyon and Trek bikes are made by http://questcomposite.com/ The Ultimate can be run with "normal" stems and you could sell the integrated one. ;)

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