From EPS to Di2.... Advise and Feedback!

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
avispa
Posts: 275
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 2:36 am

by avispa

Hi Everyone:

I have two bikes and I would like to give Shimano a try after more than 25 years on Campy. For those of you that have switched from recent Campy EPS to Shimano Di2 or have bikes with both, what are your impressions? What you hate and love the most about each group? What Advise would you provide a new Shimano user? One of the reasons I'd like to try Shimano is because the overwhelming support, warranty and compatibility with just about anything out there. Unfortunately, I have found that Campy, although having a strong presence among many of us "in the know", Campy lacks the widespread availability as Shimano compatible things...

Please understand this is not a I hate Campy/I hate Shimano post and I wouldn't want it to become such a discussion.

Thanks!

by Weenie


RyanH
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by RyanH

I haven't had EPS but I can provide feedback of Campy shifters/braking to 9150. The ergonomics of Campy is unique. I find that in the drops the brake levers feel far away and I usually immediately notice how thin the blades are compared to Campy. I prefer the curve of the shifter bodies and the hook at the top which is nice when in a faux aero position. Shimano 9150 levers are very petite. For whatever reason, I'm more prone to arm numbness on 9150. Overall, ergonomics go to Campy in my opinion.

On the braking end of things, the one thing I like most about Campy is the brake feel while on the hoods. I feel like they have a lot more leverage at the hoods for a good strong initial bite. The 9100 brakes are stronger and more powerful but Campy differential brakes are a pleasure to use in practice and handled the very technical steep descent of Tuna canyon with aplomb and not locking the rear wheel once despite several high speed sections straight into a very tight turn. With eeBrakes, Campy has the edge in brake feel over 9100 levers. 9100 levers provide a lot less bite on the hoods than Campy.

Those are just some initial thoughts that may be relevant.

2old4this
Posts: 366
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:26 am

by 2old4this

This is covered a number of times, but here is a quick summary...

I have SR EPS v2 and V3, DA 7090, 9070 and 9150.

For me setting up EPS is a little harder. It takes me longer to get perfect shifting. But once they are set up correctly, I don't think I can tell the difference in performance for rear shifting. Front shifting, however, is better with the DA (true for both EPS v2 and V3.)

Campy, for some reason, still does not have sprinter/climber switches, and that is the deal killer for me. On a typical 40-50 miles ride, I shift the front 900+ times, and I am mostly on the top of the handlebars. With Shimano, I have a number of switches. So I do not have to move my hands for shifting. With Campy, well, it becomes a little boring after a little while. For century rides, I do not even bother taking a bike with Campy :-(

Campy's ergonomics are better, hands down. Period. DA 9150 and 9170 are better than the previous iterations but not there yet. However, Campy does not have any way of micro adjusting the reach (I believe the latest iterations of mechanical versions have fixed this.) So, I had to put a little "support" at the back of the shifters for Campy. It is simple DYI. Still DA has a screw :-)

And the last point; price. Why is SR EPS so expensive? :noidea: The difference in pricing is more pronounced if you go with 9070. They are heavily discounted now.

Given the above points, I cannot justify buying EPS.

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TonyM
Posts: 3221
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

I have EPS V3 and Dura Ace Di2 9170.
Both are excellent actually.

In terms of shifting etc... both are excellent. The shifters of the Dura Ace Di2 9170 are a tiny bit smaller compared to the EPS SR.
The EPS interface is visible and cannot be hidden like for the Di2 version in the frame or at the ends of the handlebars.

The main difference is in terms of settings etc... The Di2 gives you much more settings in their e-tube app compared to the MyCampy app. I understood however that a newer MyCampy app should be soon released (?).

jih
Posts: 245
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:54 pm

by jih

2old4this wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:49 pm
typical 40-50 miles ride, I shift the front 900+ times
You might be overestimating. 900 times in 50 miles is one front shift every 80 meters.

ParisCarbon
Posts: 1395
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 5:39 am
Location: Winnipeg Canada

by ParisCarbon

Super Rec 2015 Mech on my Cannondale, 9070 Di2 on my Tarmac...
Feel wise. I like the feel of Campy levers more..
I like the Dura Ace brakes better..

Electronic wise, can't speak for EPS but I got so used to my sprint shifters on the Di2 I don't know what Id do without em now.... I always found that downshift in a sprint difficult with Campy for me from the drops.. I love both systems to be honest..its a nice to go back and ride the mech.. and its nice to flip to electronic.. I am contimplating Mech 12 for my Cannondale and curious to see what EPS 12 offers in the coming months... the tarmacs and shiv may get swapped to 12.. who knows! (Of course when I do that Dura Ace will come with 13 or something crazy....)

2old4this
Posts: 366
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:26 am

by 2old4this

jih wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:49 pm
2old4this wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:49 pm
typical 40-50 miles ride, I shift the front 900+ times
You might be overestimating. 900 times in 50 miles is one front shift every 80 meters.
That is the count from Garmin. Where I ride is very hilly, and I don't like pushing hard (my race days are long gone...)

avispa
Posts: 275
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 2:36 am

by avispa

So it seems I can't go wrong with one or the other! It's great to have choices like that....

I'm actually going to be wise and hang on.... better wait for EPS 12 and see what Campy is gonna bring to the table then.

I do agree with you all, ergonomics of Campy is outstanding and my riding style never calls for crazy sprints, so no need for buttons like that....

ParisCarbon
Posts: 1395
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 5:39 am
Location: Winnipeg Canada

by ParisCarbon

Campagnolo USA more or less told me don't expect EPS in North America til early next year... so we've got lots of time to save and contimplate!

CallumRD1
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:54 pm

by CallumRD1

jih wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:49 pm
2old4this wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:49 pm
typical 40-50 miles ride, I shift the front 900+ times
You might be overestimating. 900 times in 50 miles is one front shift every 80 meters.
If it takes 3 hours to ride 50 miles and you shift 900 times, that means that the average time between shifts is 12 seconds!

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TonyM
Posts: 3221
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

2old4this wrote:
jih wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:49 pm
2old4this wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:49 pm
typical 40-50 miles ride, I shift the front 900+ times
You might be overestimating. 900 times in 50 miles is one front shift every 80 meters.
That is the count from Garmin. Where I ride is very hilly, and I don't like pushing hard (my race days are long gone...)
How do you see this count? In your Garmin?

2old4this
Posts: 366
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:26 am

by 2old4this

If you have the bluetooth transmitter (like EWWU111), at the end of each ride, the summary includes front & rear shift counts...

LiquidCooled
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 5:46 am

by LiquidCooled

CallumRD1 wrote:
jih wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:49 pm
2old4this wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:49 pm
typical 40-50 miles ride, I shift the front 900+ times
You might be overestimating. 900 times in 50 miles is one front shift every 80 meters.
If it takes 3 hours to ride 50 miles and you shift 900 times, that means that the average time between shifts is 12 seconds!
I believe 2old4this' numbers. But notice that every gear changed is counted as a shift. So if, for example, you go up 4 cogs at some moment when the road turns up, that's counted as 4 shifts, not 1 shift. On a recent, very hilly ride, I saw over 700 shifts in 33 miles.

EDIT: I just reread 2old4this' post and noticed he wrote that he shifted the FRONT 900 times in 50 miles (not 900 overall gear changes, which is what I first thought I'd read). That's a little harder for me to see.
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2017 Giant TCR Advanced Pro 0 Disc
2003 Cannondale R1000 (CAAD7)

2old4this
Posts: 366
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:26 am

by 2old4this

You are right, I should have said gear changes, not shifts...

RussellS
Posts: 862
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:31 am

by RussellS

LiquidCooled wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 10:04 am
But notice that every gear changed is counted as a shift. So if, for example, you go up 4 cogs at some moment when the road turns up, that's counted as 4 shifts, not 1 shift. On a recent, very hilly ride, I saw over 700 shifts in 33 miles.
Maybe the counter looks at the size of the chainrings. 53 and 39 or 50 and 34. Then for every front derailleur shift, it says you shifted 14 or 16 times! So 900 shifts in 50 miles. Divide the 900 by 14 and you get 64 shifts. About one and a fourth shifts per mile. That seems reasonable.

by Weenie


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