If you are in between frame size, go up or down?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
RussellS
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Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:31 am

by RussellS

morganb wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 3:07 pm
Zakalwe wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:59 pm
A lot of that has to do with bar shapes and integrated shifters though, old bikes with little saddle/bar drop had massive drops and there weren’t hoods to rest your hands on. You didn’t need such a low bar height as you do now, where hoods are the primary position for a lot of riders and shallow drop bars are better suited to most needs
Something interesting from an interview with Viviani, his ViAS has lower bar set up than his Tarmac and he essentially said he can't use the drops on the ViAS for regular riding and only gets in them for the sprint.
I've seen a lot of pro sprints where the riders were on the hoods for the final couple of kilometers. I always wonder why they don't ride the sprint and the 5 kilometers coming up to the sprint in the drop? You are faster due to being more aero, you have better control because your torso is lower and when the guy next to you bangs his shoulder into you, you won't go off line.

by Weenie


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TonyM
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by TonyM

Yes on the drops as low as possible...but the question is when the drops are that low how long can you maintain that position without affecting your power? Remember the Pros uses already smaller frame, s therefore lower stack, usually no spacers eyc...
So I suppose they go there only for the boost and for a limited period of time.

AJS914
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by AJS914

Hasn't it been proven that on the hoods, arms parallel with the ground is a faster aero position than in the drops?

I think the mistake average joes make these days is sizing up because they can't stand the look of spacers and they want the slammed pro look. So, they go for the larger frame, less seatpost showing and a shorter stem. And they want a racing bike rather than an endurance bike with a taller head tube. Personally I don't mind a few spacers.

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TonyM
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by TonyM

AJS914 wrote:Hasn't it been proven that on the hoods, arms parallel with the ground is a faster aero position than in the drops?
Yepp!
But sprinting is a different story. Usually you can apply more power in the drops and out the saddle.

northwestern
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Location: Phoenix,AZ

by northwestern

I always go smaller size because it's easier to rest your forearms on the handlebar.

Aya
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by Aya

Down

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

lol there's no definitive answer, as it's not just about drop but also wheelbase and angles, that can really alter handling. for more of a steady pacing I'd go size up. for something more lively, climbing or sprinting - one size down. or, I'd rather look for a different brand that provides the right size for me
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Calnago
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by Calnago

^^This! There is proper “fit” for your body, then there is proper “fit” for the bike and where the two meet makes for a whole lot of inbetweens depending on intended use, personal preferences, etc. I would walk out of a shop where someone is advising you to get the smallest size frame you can fit on.
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Hexsense
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Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2015 12:41 am

by Hexsense

Down unless smaller size have head tube angle and handling charactoristic which is worse for your use.
For example, if sizing down make headtube angle get a lot slacker (like from 73 degree to 71.5 degree) while keeping the same fork which will result in more stable but harder to make a sharp turn. You may prefer a larger size instead (or some may prefer handling of the smaller size, because it's more stable).

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fa63
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Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

I prefer to size up; I would rather use a shorter stem (within reason, of course) than run a giant stack of spacers.

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