Better bike for endurance

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

morrisond wrote:
07stuntin6r wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:44 pm
jekyll man wrote:The crux of the matter why you got blown away in your crit is you're still rocking a dork disc, and front wheel backwards :wink:

Seriously, i'd think you are going the wrong way. You dont want to be coming farther up and back, but rotate yourself around your hips to come forwards, instead of literally plonking yourself on the saddle and tring to reach the drops.

Obviously you're quite a big chap, so it might be worth getting some wider bars to allow some room for your chest.

FWIW you should be able to ride 50 miles pretty comfortably on pretty much anything, heck i've done twice that on my track bike!
Dork disk? You mean not being 1x? It felt comfortable to me. I can slightly Bend my elbows when reaching the bars. Only thing I've adjusted was my seat forward a little based off the Marks I made from when I first got fitted.

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Dork disc is the plastic protector behind your cassette. Not really needed and it saves weight by removing it. It looks dorky - and your front wheel is on backwards - the Quick release levers are usually on the same side. If your tire is unidirectional it was running backwards.

Oh - and Flip your stem up until you can do your 50 miles.
Oh well yeah I actually didn't notice it was still on there until I put my wheel back on. During the race I had carbon wheels on.

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by Weenie


grumpus
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2016 3:31 am

by grumpus

If you're in need of a new best friend, bike shop owners are probably lining up already

jih
Posts: 158
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:54 pm

by jih

07stuntin6r wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 12:57 am
During the race I had carbon wheels on.
So you own separate, carbon race day wheels, and haven’t completed one medium-distance ride yet?

Guys, at this point pretty sure we’re being trolled.

07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

jih wrote:
07stuntin6r wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 12:57 am
During the race I had carbon wheels on.
So you own separate, carbon race day wheels, and haven’t completed one medium-distance ride yet?

Guys, at this point pretty sure we’re being trolled.
I got them a year ago used after I got my bike so decided to get them setup.


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Leviathan
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Location: Mallorca, Spain
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by Leviathan

jih wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:28 pm
Guys, can we drop the conversation on how frames are measured?

We all agree that modern frame sizing doesn't make much sense, but we have some numbers that are roughly equivalent between makes even though they don't actually measure anything. They used to measure seattube sizes but they've drifted so far from that that now they're a totally abstract number.

And... that's it. It's not really that intersting.
I was reading something by Alain de Botton reminding us of the importance of the Socratic Method when it comes to public statements, to whit:
"Is is right?"
"Is it nice?"
"Is it HELPFUL?"
Whilst I admit my own hypocracy in posting this, Im not sure what comments on this thread made me think of it in the first place.

07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

Sp to revive an old thread I'm able to do 20miles. Still looking into finding a good place for a legit bike fit. There is shop I go to that does retul so I'm leaning towards that. Only issues I'm finding now is some lower back pain hopefully due to fit. Ive lowered my seat, stem and added a longer stem and carbon bars as well. Still wanting another bike preferably disc, but that will have to wait and I'll most likely build one. Either a caad12 or tarmac who knows....but here's the ride! ImageImage

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5DII
Posts: 214
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2014 7:52 pm

by 5DII

waltthizzney wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 1:33 am
TheKaiser wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 7:37 pm
waltthizzney wrote:
Wed Mar 28, 2018 10:59 pm
do not listen to this Keto garbage. It is not not sustainable and destroys your organs.
Can you provide some citations for your claims? And I don't mean a link to Durianrider's Youtube channel. I also don't mean a link to a "doctor's" website where some guy with no background in clinicial research is using his labcoat to get people to think he knows something about nutrition, when really he just likes animals or thinks veganism will save the planet. There are an equal number of doctors who will tell you that going keto, or at the very least low carb/high fat, is the best diet solution.
find me one time in history where humans ate low carb diet. it does not make sense genetically. Nevermind if you are seeking athletic performance. The doctors you are referring to are just pushing their own agenda, all the unbiased research is extremely clear.

Go read this book and the studies referenced. The science is obvious, if you want to ignore that go ahead, it your own health you are putting at risk. it is pretty obvious looking at the western diet there is a huge problem. People being fat and obese is a new phenomenon. Now you want to treat these problems with these ridiculous diets like Keto? How anyone can be against plant based eating is beyond me.

https://www.amazon.ca/How-Not-Die-Disco ... 1250066115
Not arguing that a plant based diet is wrong or bad, in fact it is healthy. However, humans benefit greatly from eating meat.

Until agriculture was developed around 10,000 years ago, all humans got their food by hunting, gathering, and fishing. As farming emerged, nomadic hunter-gatherers gradually were pushed off prime farmland, and eventually they became limited to the forests of the Amazon, the arid grasslands of Africa, the remote islands of Southeast Asia, and the tundra of the Arctic. Today only a few scattered tribes of hunter-gatherers remain on the planet.
Eating meat is thought by some scientists to have been crucial to the evolution of our ancestors’ larger brains about two million years ago. By starting to eat calorie-dense meat and marrow instead of the low-quality plant diet of apes, our direct ancestor, Homo erectus, took in enough extra energy at each meal to help fuel a bigger brain. Digesting a higher quality diet and less bulky plant fiber would have allowed these humans to have much smaller guts. This means that from the time of H. erectus, the human body has depended on a diet of energy-dense food—especially meat.

we have a small handful of foraging populations that remain on the planet. So far studies of foragers like the Tsimane, Arctic Inuit, and Hadza have found that these peoples traditionally didn’t develop high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, or cardiovascular disease.

A Stone Age diet “is the one and only diet that ideally fits our genetic makeup,” writes Loren Cordain, an evolutionary nutritionist at Colorado State University, in his book The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to Eat. After studying the diets of living hunter-gatherers and concluding that 73 percent of these societies derived more than half their calories from meat, Cordain came up with his own Paleo prescription: Eat plenty of lean meat and fish but not dairy products, beans, or cereal grains—foods introduced into our diet after the invention of cooking and agriculture.

Fast-forward a couple of million years to when the human diet took another major turn with the invention of agriculture. The domestication of grains such as sorghum, barley, wheat, corn, and rice created a plentiful and predictable food supply, allowing farmers’ wives to bear babies in rapid succession—one every 2.5 years instead of one every 3.5 years for hunter-gatherers. A population explosion followed; before long, farmers outnumbered foragers.

Over the past decade anthropologists have struggled to answer key questions about this transition. Was agriculture a clear step forward for human health? Or in leaving behind our hunter-gatherer ways to grow crops and raise livestock, did we give up a healthier diet and stronger bodies in exchange for food security?

We hve both sharp teeth and molars, pointing to a diet in both meat and vegetation. versatility is key to the human dietary niche. It would be pointless to try to emulate a single ancestral diet: there wasn't one. Humans have continued to evolve since the Neolithic Revolution, and many of us have enzymes that our ancestors did not have, enabling us to digest starchy foods effectively and digest milk as adults.



https://www.nationalgeographic.com/food ... n-of-diet/
http://time.com/4252373/meat-eating-veganism-evolution/
https://www.nature.com/articles/545026a

07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r



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07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

Sp swapped my brakes out for some used Dura ace 9000. Love the look of these on my bike and the stock axis brakes always bothered me. Got crimps coming, but is there a different end I can use for the brake cable going into caliper? ImageImage

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ms6073
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Location: Houston, Texas

by ms6073

07stuntin6r wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:32 am
Only issues I'm finding now is some lower back pain hopefully due to fit. Ive lowered my seat, stem and added a longer stem and carbon bars as well.
Seriously? You are suffering lower back pain and thought that going lower and longer on the front was the answer?
Michael - The Anaerobic Threshold is neither...

07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

ms6073 wrote:
07stuntin6r wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:32 am
Only issues I'm finding now is some lower back pain hopefully due to fit. Ive lowered my seat, stem and added a longer stem and carbon bars as well.
Seriously? You are suffering lower back pain and thought that going lower and longer on the front was the answer?
Yeah I did and since my initial post I've been able to lower etc eith better flexibility. Just need to get a proper fit to fine tune it.

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mattr
Posts: 3761
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Reading the whole thread from start to finish gives me one overriding impression. Your fitter isn't very good.

07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

mattr wrote:Reading the whole thread from start to finish gives me one overriding impression. Your fitter isn't very good.
Because I was only fit initially when I got the bike which wasnt nothing special....just to get me going. I'm going to get an actual full fit this week.

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surfinguru
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2012 9:16 pm

by surfinguru

I don’t want to go too far down the rabbit hole of telling what you should or shouldn’t be doing, so I’ll just say these few things:

My first road bike was a 1995 Allez something or other. I trained for and did my first and subsequent century rides on that bike. Loved everything about it other than the bb flex when out of the saddle. There is absolutely no reason you can’t reach your goals on the bike you have now.

From my perspective, you just need to ride more. Sounds like you’re time strapped to some extent, but you going to have to find a way to start increasing your mileage and saddle time - simple as that. You can use the tried and true “increase by 10%” rule, or just formulate your own rate of increase. Either way, you can’t circumvent / shortcut the basics.

Good luck OP.

Now Rule#5 it and go ride your bike!

by Weenie


07stuntin6r
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 2:09 am

by 07stuntin6r

surfinguru wrote:I don’t want to go too far down the rabbit hole of telling what you should or shouldn’t be doing, so I’ll just say these few things:

My first road bike was a 1995 Allez something or other. I trained for and did my first and subsequent century rides on that bike. Loved everything about it other than the bb flex when out of the saddle. There is absolutely no reason you can’t reach your goals on the bike you have now.

From my perspective, you just need to ride more. Sounds like you’re time strapped to some extent, but you going to have to find a way to start increasing your mileage and saddle time - simple as that. You can use the tried and true “increase by 10%” rule, or just formulate your own rate of increase. Either way, you can’t circumvent / shortcut the basics.

Good luck OP.

Now Rule#5 it and go ride your bike!
Thanks, I just love upgrading everything I got. I am planning on keeping this bike and waiting on another....prob build one instead. I try to ride whenever I can. Wish I had a couple hours after I got home to be selfish and ride instead of spending quality time lol

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