Best place for long term tyre storage

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Eleven21
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:08 pm

by Eleven21

You'll have to forgive me for asking, as I realise this probably gets asked time and time again. I have purchased a small stash of good summer clinchers and tubulars due to our local bike store having a sale and I'm unsure of the best place to store these to stop them from prematurely degrading.

From past experiences I've come to the conclusion that keeping them out in the shed isn't the best place due to the extreme temperature fluctuations. Tyres that I might have ridden for less than 1000 km but a couple of seasons old seemed to develop cracks when left out there on our winter wheels. (With reference to a pair of my favourite vredestein winter tyres).

We don't have a cellar so I think my only other options would be to keep them boxed in the loft ( but again gave concerns they might be subject to extreme temperature fluctuations). Or out in garage.

I starting to wonder if I'd be better off just keeping them in a spare cupboard indoors (or would that be considered to warm)

Apologies to all if these is a silly question. Perhaps I'm over thinking this?

sungod
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Joined: Fri Dec 24, 2010 9:37 pm
Location: it's raining, it must be uk

by sungod

cool, dry, dark, not exposed to fumes/chemicals that might degrade the rubber, especially if they are non-vulcanised or with latex tubes

fwiw i store my veloflex/other tubs laid flat up on a high shelf in a store room, seem to last fine - it's unheated but never gets too hot/cold as it's mostly 'surrounded' by the rest of the building

by Weenie


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LouisN
Posts: 2416
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:44 am
Location: Canada

by LouisN

I have a cellar, but I don't want all my wines to taste like rubber in 15-20yrs ;) .
So I keep them in the basement, in the coolest place I can put them.
I read it's better to let them age in places not too dry, so the natural rubber dries more progressively.
Here's an old video on tubular aging:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKfz0tkYin4

LOuis :)

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Calnago
Posts: 6466
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Ha... I remember that video... I think they eventually sold those leftovers for some outrageous price to those willing to pay and get some "professionally aged" tubulars from a dark and dingy basement. Best marketing scam ever. I completely disagree with the old guys statement that old tubulars are more "supple" than new tubulars. My experience is that rubber degrades over time... it will become harder, then brittle, then start cracking eventually. Same reason car tires have a shelf life of around 6 years attached to them. Perhpas it was different in olden times. I have some tubulars lying around in a closet competing for my girlfriend's clothes space. She smells like rubber most of the time. I think that's what I love most about her.

I like to have spare tubulars on hand for sure, but I'm more worried about them degrading over time than anything else. If I knew the shop always had the tires I use in stock all the time then that would be the way I'd go, to ensure I was getting new tires versus old. I have tires that are indeed 6-7 years old hanging in a closet becasue I stocked up on some 24mm Veloflex Roubaixs when they changed their sizing and increased the size of the Roubaixs to 25mm from 24mm and the Carbons to 23mm from 22mm. I'd rather they weren't getting so old, but so be it.
There's always a sale on tires somewhere. I'm not sure I'd bother with "stocking up", unless you know you're gong to use them within a reasonable time, or they are discontinuing your favorite whatever it is.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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Leviathan
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Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:49 am
Location: Mallorca, Spain
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by Leviathan

Calnago wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 7:17 pm
. She smells like rubber most of the time. I think that's what I love most about her.
I married a chef, who smells of food most of the time. I KNOW thats what I love most about her.

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Calnago
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Ha... now I'm certain to stay in your hotel at some point. Buddy just left for Mallorca yesterday with his team for 9 days of training. I made him an espresso on his way to the airport.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

srshaw
Posts: 171
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 6:06 pm

by srshaw

I've got a 1986 motorbike in the garage with an original front tyre. Not sure I'd really want to ride that. Tyres might improve for a bit but they definately degrade after a while.

c60rider
Posts: 320
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:12 pm

by c60rider

srshaw wrote:
Sat Mar 03, 2018 10:22 pm
I've got a 1986 motorbike in the garage with an original front tyre. Not sure I'd really want to ride that. Tyres might improve for a bit but they definately degrade after a while.
Definitely not. Car tyres they suggest over 6 years old should be replaced regardless of wear. I've got some older bike tyres left on wheels that I'm not using and they've perished in places. I don't know the point at which bike tyres start to go but more than 2 or 3 years old not sure I'd want to be using them. No idea why I'd have bought tyres and not used them in that time in the first place. :noidea:

Eleven21
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:08 pm

by Eleven21

Calnago wrote: ...or they are discontinuing your favorite whatever it is.
Coincidentally some of the said tyres I've stocked up on are the Vittoria Open Pavé CG 27mm and 25mm clinchers (now discontinued)

by Weenie


Zakalwe
Posts: 461
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 3:15 pm

by Zakalwe

Oxygen and light are the enemies of rubber, so your best bet is to seal them up in some sort of bag and get enough air out as possible. Those vacuum storage bags would probably be good, the ones you keep duvets and stuff in. Then keep it somewhere dark.

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