New Emonda build and need to lose some grams.

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
garysol1
Shop Owner
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 1:33 pm
Location: Michigan

by garysol1

I just completed the build on my 2018 Emonda SLR 54cm. I did not do a weight weenie build but now that its done I wish I had :). Complete bike ready to ride comes in at 14.65lb ( 6645gr). I would really like to get her down to under 14lb. Help me to lose 300grams!! Where do you guys think the most cost effective changes would be to achieve this goal? My build consists of ..

2018 Emonda SLR frame rim brake
Bontrager Speed Stop calipers
D/A 9000 pedals
Aeolus 5 wheelset (1,440gr)
Specialized turbo cotton tires with standard tubes.
Shimano D/A 9000 mech drivetrain
Ultegra cassette
Specialized Phenom pro saddle with carbon rails
Bontrager XXX bars
Bontrager RXL stem
Zipp CX tape

Image

Image
Emonda SLR
Kona JTS
Specialized AWOL
Trek Stache 9.7
Specialized Fatboy

morganb
Posts: 539
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:30 pm

by morganb

The new Bontrager brakes are pretty light so I would think your best places to look would be wheels, possibly tubs if you are okay with them, something like the XXX integrated bar and stem or an ultra light bar/stem combo, and possibly cranks, I didn't see what was listed. You could save grams on the cassette by switching to a Red but you might lose a bit of shifting smoothness.

by Weenie


garysol1
Shop Owner
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 1:33 pm
Location: Michigan

by garysol1

morganb wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:00 pm
The new Bontrager brakes are pretty light so I would think your best places to look would be wheels, possibly tubs if you are okay with them, something like the XXX integrated bar and stem or an ultra light bar/stem combo, and possibly cranks, I didn't see what was listed. You could save grams on the cassette by switching to a Red but you might lose a bit of shifting smoothness.
I think I would rather deal with a bit of extra weight instead of going to tubs. What a pain. Cranks are D/A 9000 I need to compare the weight of a Red cassette to a D/A cassette. My last D/A cassette was bit creaky but I hear they have fixed that issue. Good call on the bar stem combo. I need to look into that.
Emonda SLR
Kona JTS
Specialized AWOL
Trek Stache 9.7
Specialized Fatboy

pdlpsher1
Posts: 1543
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

Sram cassette for sure. I’ve been using Conti supersonic tubes with great success. 50g each and they reduce rolling resistance, although not as low as latex. But they are lighter than latex. Probably the best gram per $ there. Don’t touch the pedals


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

darnellrm
Posts: 215
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2009 1:06 pm
Location: NC, USA

by darnellrm

Isn't this frame supposed to be well under 700g? If you aren't under 12 lbs, you aren't even trying....

User avatar
prendrefeu
Posts: 8610
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:32 pm
Location: Los Feliz, Los Angeles, California
Contact:

by prendrefeu

Brakes are too heavy
Pedals are too heavy
Wheelset is too heavy (even if you go clincher, you can still get to 1200g easily)
Use lighter tubes will save you 50-100g between the wheels
Cassette too heavy. SRAM XG1190 is superior anyway.
Cut down your steerer, it's too long.
Use lighter spacers (Box Components, save some money while you're at it)
Reduce the length of that seatpost topper... seriously, why do you have it so long?!
Swap bolts to al or ti.
Ditch the cable housing for iLinks or equivalent.

etc, etc, etc
Exp001 || Other projects in the works.

garysol1
Shop Owner
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 1:33 pm
Location: Michigan

by garysol1

Alright..... I have a lot of work to do. Thanks for all the input. Time to break out the $$$$
Emonda SLR
Kona JTS
Specialized AWOL
Trek Stache 9.7
Specialized Fatboy

pdlpsher1
Posts: 1543
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

The pedal is the worst place to save weight. The same for QRs. Both the pedals and QRs contribute to power transfer.

There are other things related to safety that I wouldn’t touch, like steerer tube compression plug.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

dbnm
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2016 4:16 pm

by dbnm

Bontrager XXX integrated stem and bars

Cassette

RussellS
Posts: 739
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:31 am

by RussellS

pdlpsher1 wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:33 pm
Both the pedals and QRs contribute to power transfer.
The quick releases contribut to power transfer? By that "logic" (HaHaHoHo) I suppose the seatpost binder bolt and the seatpost clamp contributes to power transfer. Your big arse sits on the seatpost/saddle, and that is where the power starts, your arse.

Oh, and since you may be living in the 1980s or before, bike frames now all use vertical dropouts to hold the rear wheel. Not horizontal dropouts. So the rear quick release does not really hold the rear wheel solidly in place. I know you thought the rear quick release would make sure the rear wheel did not move when you were pedaling and therefore lead to a loss of power transfer. But the vertical dropouts on all bikes now keeps the wheel from moving forward. The quick release just keeps it a little bit more secure if the dropout is a bit oversized and keeps it from dropping out the bottom if you pull the rear wheel up to go over a curb. In the olden days, 40 years ago, the quick release did clamp the rear wheel in place along the horizontal dropout. You did not want the rear wheel to slide forward on the dropout. But now days, the wheel cannot slide forward in the vertical dropout.

User avatar
oldnslow2
Posts: 220
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2016 1:50 pm

by oldnslow2

Not sure why your bike is heavier than mine.

2015 SLR
Sram Red eTap
Bontrager brakes
Zipp 303
Race XXX lite bars
Race XXX lite 110mm stem
Paradigm RXXXL saddle
Look Keo Blase II Ti
Conti GP4000SII 25mm
XXX bottle cages (3)
Garmin out front mount
Flare R mount
Jagwire link brake cables

Image

User avatar
prendrefeu
Posts: 8610
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:32 pm
Location: Los Feliz, Los Angeles, California
Contact:

by prendrefeu

pdlpsher1 wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:33 pm
The pedal is the worst place to save weight.
???

DA9000 Pedals = 248g/pair

There are plenty that are lighter than that and just as durable.

pdlpsher1 wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:33 pm
There are other things related to safety that I wouldn’t touch, like steerer tube compression plug.

Do you know how compression plugs actually work?
EE Cycleworks produces one of the lightest out there, and it's perfectly safe. Once you have everything set the cap bolt can be replaced with nylon.
Given, of course, that you understand how headset bearings are set.
Exp001 || Other projects in the works.

User avatar
Calnago
Posts: 6224
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

I’m with @pdlphser1 on both counts above. “Compression plugs” often, though not always, provide much more than just an anchor to provide bearing preload. They also provide a measure of structural integrity in a lot instances. Again, not always, but I wouldn’t just be throwing them away without taking that into consideration. I’ve tried lighter pedals, like LOOK Ti Blades. Sure they save weight, but they’ve been collecting dust after putting the Dura Ace pedals back on after a hundred miles or so.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

garysol1
Shop Owner
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 1:33 pm
Location: Michigan

by garysol1

oldnslow2 wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:07 pm
Not sure why your bike is heavier than mine.


Image
Could be because your saddle is leaning up against the scale :) . Our bikes are pretty similar save for your etap. That could account for some of it.
Emonda SLR
Kona JTS
Specialized AWOL
Trek Stache 9.7
Specialized Fatboy

pdlpsher1
Posts: 1543
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

RussellS wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:01 pm
So the rear quick release does not really hold the rear wheel solidly in place. I know you thought the rear quick release would make sure the rear wheel did not move when you were pedaling and therefore lead to a loss of power transfer. But the vertical dropouts on all bikes now keeps the wheel from moving forward. The quick release just keeps it a little bit more secure if the dropout is a bit oversized and keeps it from dropping out the bottom if you pull the rear wheel up to go over a curb. In the olden days, 40 years ago, the quick release did clamp the rear wheel in place along the horizontal dropout. You did not want the rear wheel to slide forward on the dropout. But now days, the wheel cannot slide forward in the vertical dropout.
By design the dropout slot is always oversized. Otherwise you won't be able to get the wheel into the dropouts. What keeps the rear wheel from moving side to side (i.e. preventing the rear tire from rubbing the chainstays) is the job of the QR, not the dropouts. Take a good look at your bike. Remove the QR nut on the rear wheel. You will see that the hub axle is slightly smaller than the dropout slot. It's definitely not an interference fit by design.

I have tried some very light weight QRs, the Extralite Aliens 4. They aren't stiff enough to keep the wheels in a secure position. There are perhaps some light weight QRs that are stiffer than the Aliens 4 that can do the job. I'm not saying all all light weight QRs are crap. I'm just saying stay away from the really light weight ones, especially those with a butted Ti or carbon rods. I have heard a lot of good reviews on the Zipp QRs. I've not tried the Zipps. Personally I'm using the Mavic Ti QRs. The are lighter than the Dura Ace but much heavier than the Aliens 4. Bolt-on QRs might be OK as long as the Ti rod isn't butted too much like those on the Aliens 4s.
Last edited by pdlpsher1 on Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:27 am, edited 3 times in total.

by Weenie


Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post