Hardest thing(s) you found from endurance events?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
RimClencher
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Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2014 1:00 am

by RimClencher

Boshk wrote: ↑
Fri Aug 24, 2018 2:21 pm

Trying to figure out why I've developed pain under my right foot only....basically, feels like someone has taped/glued a small peddle on the balls of my feet below the 4th toe.....always in that position.
The foot pain sounds like something called "Morton's neuroma" that seems to be fairly common in cyclists and can be caused by shoes that are too naroow. Wearing shoes with a large toe box like those made by Bont or Lake might help resolve it over time.

by Weenie


mattr
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by mattr

Himalayan salt is a very serious business. (At least it is for those involved in marketing it, and David Avocado Wolfe. Which tells you all you need to know about it.)

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Himalayan salt is 98% NaCL. You only get trace amounts of potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc. certainly not enough to matter. I mean, you also get trace amounts of uranium, plutonium, radium, polonium, cesium, mercury, lead and other bad "minerals!" Whatever you believe about the purity and natural benefits of Himalayan salt is mostly homeopathic level junk science. You are better off licking your own arm if you want "additional minerals."

It's funny that you insist that I need to Google something and Calnago insists that I Google too much. You guys!

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Lewn777
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by Lewn777

TobinHatesYou wrote: ↑
Sat Aug 25, 2018 7:21 am
Himalayan salt is 98% NaCL. You only get trace amounts of potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc. certainly not enough to matter. I mean, you also get trace amounts of uranium, plutonium, radium, polonium, cesium, mercury, lead and other bad "minerals!" Whatever you believe about the purity and natural benefits of Himalayan salt is mostly homeopathic level junk science. You are better off licking your own arm if you want "additional minerals."

It's funny that you insist that I need to Google something and Calnago insists that I Google too much. You guys!
Oh so you agree that it has magnesium, iodine, and is purer and less refined than most other salt. Cool. 8)
I never said I used it for the additional minerals, I simply think it tastes better. Other purity and mineral claims are simply a bonus.

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

Mmm, taste the polonium. Taste the freshness! If you can taste the difference between 100% NaCL and 98% NaCL...

A Nuun tablet has 360mg of sodium, 100mg of potassium, 25mg of magnesium. If you drop 360mg of Himalayan salt into your grape cordial, only about 1.3mg of that is potassium.

Like I said, you're better off just licking your arm if you want potassium.

jasjas
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by jasjas

TobinHatesYou wrote: ↑
Sat Aug 25, 2018 7:39 am

A Nuun tablet has 360mg of sodium, 100mg of potassium, 25mg of magnesium. If you drop 360mg of Himalayan salt into your grape cordial, only about 1.3mg of that is potassium.

Like I said, you're better off just licking your arm if you want potassium.
I'd rather eat a banana :lol:

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

RimClencher wrote: ↑
Sat Aug 25, 2018 7:10 am
Boshk wrote: ↑
Fri Aug 24, 2018 2:21 pm

Trying to figure out why I've developed pain under my right foot only....basically, feels like someone has taped/glued a small peddle on the balls of my feet below the 4th toe.....always in that position.
The foot pain sounds like something called "Morton's neuroma" that seems to be fairly common in cyclists and can be caused by shoes that are too naroow. Wearing shoes with a large toe box like those made by Bont or Lake might help resolve it over time.
A big issue for me. People with Morton's neuroma must have shoes that allow for the foot to spread fully without resistance from the sides of the shoes. Footbeds also must have good transverse arch support. Look into metatarsal pads as well. If ignored this problem can become debilitating meaning no walking and maybe no cycling in extreme cases. Bont shoes can make things worse because of the bathtub sole design which force the metatarsal heads against each other when the foot is weighted.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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themidge
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by themidge

I'd say route is quite important for long rides as well as all the other things like nutrition and position, etc.
I find that having a destination that isn't where you started is better for morale, especially compared to an out and back because you can't just call it quits and turn round any time you like. Also, if you have to navigate yourself or even just follow a pre planned route on your Garmin, then there is much more to think about and distract yourself from the actual riding.
For example, in the spring my family went on a holiday and I decided to cycle the 120km there, having that destination was great because I had a physical goal to aim at and of course I couldn't turn back because there'd be no one at home!
Alternatively, meet someone for lunch or something at the halfway point of an out and back, that way you can't bail.

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4ibanez
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by 4ibanez

Interesting thread - some good basics to follow. For me, the hardest thing is not to get tempted to revert to your normal comfortable speeds if you're going significantly further than normal. The feeling that you've got loads left in your legs needs to be tempered and saved for later.

I'd quite like to do a 200 miler next year, and reading this has got me feeling it a bit more. Most of my rides are under 60 miles, and I tend to try and maintain 20mph. I figure as long as I don't try and sustain anything 18mph+ for too long, that 150 should be reasonably doable...(probably slower for 200!)

I like to take electrolyte/caffeine tablets for anything hotter or longer than usual (SIS flat cola flavour). Nobody likes an arm licker! :lol:
Last edited by 4ibanez on Sun Aug 26, 2018 11:26 am, edited 2 times in total.

TobinHatesYou
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Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

4ibanez wrote: ↑
Sun Aug 26, 2018 10:56 am
Interesting thread - some good basics to follow.

I'd quite like to do a 150-200 miler next year, and reading this has got me feeling it a bit more. Most of my rides are under 60 miles, and I tend to try and maintain 20mph. I figure as long as I don't try and sustain anything 18mph+ for too long, that 150 should be reasonably doable...

I like to take electrolyte/caffeine tablets for anything hotter or longer than usual (SIS flat cola flavour). Nobody likes an arm licker! :lol:
For 150-200mi (with elevation) you are fighting a losing battle in terms of calorie deficit and being able to convert foods to energy. Eat fairly large portions for your last two meals the day before. Eat a normal sized breakfast with some low/medium glycemic-index carbs. Just before starting the ride, eat a bit of dense solid food like a Clif bar, Larabar, Luna, etc.

Shouldn’t need to be said, but hydrate continuously, not just after hard efforts or when your mouth/throat is feeling parched. Better to do it on a schedule than based on feel.

For the majority of the ride stick to solids like bars, rice cakes, PB/honey sandwiches, etc. I imagine there would be a stop for lunch somewhere...don’t go completely overboard on the protein. In the final couple of hours switch to gummies/bloks and gels. Save the caffeine for this point too. It takes almost an hour for ingested caffeine to take maximum effect, and its half-life is around 4-5 hours IIRC.

Do pack some Nuun tabs or individual packages of isotonic sports drink powder.

kode54
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by kode54

make sure you have the route loaded in with turn-by-turn notices. after 150 miles, your mind may tend to drift off and become disoriented. i've missed a few turns on a 150 mile ride that i didn't download the route onto the Garmin. they turn arrows were painted on the road. at some point, you just want to finish and missing turns can take the gusto out of your ride.
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