Disc brake pad compounds - best for road use?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Devon
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by Devon

The time has come to replace the pads on my TRP Spyre SLCs. I'm looking into different pad types (specifically those offered by SwissStop) and I have a number of choices. After some reading into the benefits of each compound I'm at a bit of a loss, as most advice focuses on mountain bike pads.

Any general advice or scientific knowledge as to which compound is best for road use? I'm thinking specifically the avoidance of heat build-up and brake fade on long/fast descents with high brake usage.
Campagnolo; because it's a bicycle, not a fishing rod.

by Weenie


TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

I went through my OEM resin pads in about 1000mi. After every ride there was a large amount of brake dust on the front and back of my fork. If you do any sort of real descending, get semi-metallic (Disc E) or full-metallic (Disc S) pads. My sintered pads will probably last >3000 miles.

Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

I considered the same question but I was looking for maximum stopping power. All my research led me back to the the stock semi metallic pads. Also better for durability.

As for heat build up/fade, the heat created will be a direct consequence of the amount of braking force you apply. The heat can only go two places - into the rotor and into the pad. The difference between pad designs will be insignificant with perhaps the exception of the some of the finned options but I don't believe any of those will fit your Spyres. The choice of rotor may make a real difference. I have settle on Shimano IceTech. Generally bigger and heavier rotors will be better.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

mike001100
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by mike001100

I rode sintered in my TRP HyRds without issue and with an increase in stopping power.

jlok
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by jlok

Mr.Gib wrote:I considered the same question but I was looking for maximum stopping power. All my research led me back to the the stock semi metallic pads. Also better for durability.

As for heat build up/fade, the heat created will be a direct consequence of the amount of braking force you apply. The heat can only go two places - into the rotor and into the pad. The difference between pad designs will be insignificant with perhaps the exception of the some of the finned options but I don't believe any of those will fit your Spyres. The choice of rotor may make a real difference. I have settle on Shimano IceTech. Generally bigger and heavier rotors will be better.


Most logical answer here :up:
Giant Propel Advanced SL Disc 1 < Propel Adv < TCR Adv SL Disc < KTM Revelator Sky < CAAD 12 Disc < Domane S Disc < Alize < CAAD 10

MoPho
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by MoPho

TobinHatesYou wrote:I went through my OEM resin pads in about 1000mi. After every ride there was a large amount of brake dust on the front and back of my fork. If you do any sort of real descending, get semi-metallic (Disc E) or full-metallic (Disc S) pads. My sintered pads will probably last >3000 miles.



Interesting. I got about 3k miles on my first set of resin pads with lots of aggressive descending. the second set seemed to wear out at about 2k miles. Just put new resin pads in, so will keep track of it.
I tried the metallic pads and they seemed like a performance improvement at first, but then they started squealing like a pig. May have to try them again now that I switched from the Ice Tech rotors :noidea:

Seems there are only two options for the Shimano 805 calipers?


Decent article:
http://road.cc/content/feature/176649-a ... brake-pads



.

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TonyM
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by TonyM

Anyone with some experience with the Swissstop disc brake pads?

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

TonyM wrote:Anyone with some experience with the Swissstop disc brake pads?


Disc E pads work well in all situations.

jlok
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Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2015 3:30 am

by jlok

my brake pads are mostly consumed by hard braking going fast down hill. Sintered pads for me as resin pads uses up very quickly...

I concur the sintered pads make more noises but i found that if i carefully adjust and center the calipers the noises would be much reduces or sometimes fully eliminated.
Giant Propel Advanced SL Disc 1 < Propel Adv < TCR Adv SL Disc < KTM Revelator Sky < CAAD 12 Disc < Domane S Disc < Alize < CAAD 10

ooo
Posts: 543
Joined: Sat May 21, 2016 12:59 pm

by ooo

There are 2 compatibles designes of metalic pads which can be used in TPR Spyre
(and 1 compatible design of resin pads)

shimano pads marked B01S (Y8C998050) - resin - wide
shimano pads marked E01S (Y8FL98010) - metalic - non-wide

non-shimano pads maked B01S - resin - wide
non-shimano pads maked B01S - metalic - wide
non-shimano pads maked E01S - metalic - wide
Attachments
B01S-shimano-wide.jpg
shimano pads marked B01S (Y8C998050) - resin - wide
E01S-shimano-non-wide.jpg
shimano pads marked E01S (Y8FL98010) - metalic - non-wide
E01S-non-shimano-wide.jpg
non-shimano - metalic - wide
Last edited by ooo on Wed Dec 06, 2017 10:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
'

stormur
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by stormur

Resin for me. Silence is priceless :mrgreen: Original TRP are fine, SwissStop Disc 15 bit better, but it's not "wunderpad" in comparison. Both stops my fat butt with more than enough power.
Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.
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I can be wrong, and have plenty of examples for that ;)

jeanjacques
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Location: France

by jeanjacques

Front: good quality semi-metallic and a disc with a large area of contact (doesn't matter for stopping power but matter for pad durability) and good heat management quality.

Rear: cheap full-metallic with the lightest disc as possible, still enough to lock the wheel and slow down for a long time.

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ms6073
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by ms6073

TobinHatesYou wrote:
TonyM wrote:Anyone with some experience with the Swissstop disc brake pads?

Disc E pads work well in all situations.

Before I switched to full hydraulic on my cross bike, I managed to wear out the resin pads in a single, muddy, icy, 50-minute cyclocross race but I was also using super-light, highly vented rotors. The next year, while not racing, had a similar issue following a week of rainy gravel riding along the Great Allegheny Passage and C&O Canal, so switched to Shimano Ice-Tech 6-bolt rotors and SwissStop Exotherm pads and did not have to replace the pads again before the swap to full hydraulic (~1700 miles). Unfortunately, Swiss Stop recently announced a recall/cease and desist for all models of the Exotherm pads.
Michael - The Anaerobic Threshold is neither...

TobinHatesYou
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by TobinHatesYou

The E (ebike) pads use the same compound as the Exotherms and have not been recalled.

by Weenie


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TonyM
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by TonyM

TobinHatesYou wrote:The E (ebike) pads use the same compound as the Exotherms (...).


Good to know that the "Disc E compound" is used in the "E" as well as in the "EXOTherm" :thumbup:

As I am looking for brake pads for the use in the wet I should most probably look at the "Disc RS compound", right?

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